Anguttara Nikaya


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Aŋguttaranikāyo
Catukkanipāto
XVII: Paṭipadā Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
The Book of the Fours
Chapter XVII: Modes of Progress

Sutta 170

Yuganaddha Suttaɱ, aka Arahattappatati Suttaɱ

Coupled[1]

Translated from the Pali by f. L. Woodward, M.A.

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[1][than] Thus have I heard:

On a certain occasion the venerable Ānanda was staying at Kosambī in Ghosita Park.

Then the Venerable Ānanda addressed the monks, saying:

"Reverend sirs."

"Your reverence," replied those monks to the venerable Ānanda.

The venerable Ananda said:

"Reverend sirs, when anyone,
be it monk or nun,
proclaims in my presence
that he has attained arahantship,
all such do so by virtue of four factors
or one of these four.

What are they?

Herein, your reverences,
a monk develops insight
preceded by calm.

In him thus developing insight
preceded by calm
is born the Way.[2]

He follows along that Way,
makes it grow,
makes much of it.

In him following,
developing,
making much of that Way,
the fetters are abandoned,
the lurking tendencies[3] come to an end.

Or again, your reverences,
a monk develops calm
preceded by insight.

In him developing calm
preceded by insight
is born the Way.

He follows along that Way,
makes it grow,
makes much of it.

In him following,
developing,
making much of that Way,
the fetters are abandoned,
the lurking tendencies come to an end.

Yet again, your reverences,
a monk develops calm-and- [163] insight coupled.[4]

In him thus developing calm-and-insight coupled
the Way is born.

He follows along that Way,
makes it grow,
makes much of it.

In him following,
developing,
making much of that Way,
the fetters are abandoned,
the lurking tendencies come to an end.

Once more, your reverences,
a monk's mind
is utterly cleared of perplexities about Dhamma.[5]

That is the time, your reverences,
when his thought
stands fixed in the very self,
settles down,
becomes one-pointed,
is composed.

In him the Way is born.

He follows along that Way,
makes it grow,
makes much of it.

In him following,
developing,
making much of that Way,
the fetters are abandoned,
the lurking tendencies come to an end.

Indeed, your reverences,
when anyone,
be it monk or nun,
proclaims in my presence
that he has attained arahantship,
all such do so by virtue of four factors
or one of these four.'

 


[1] Yuga-naddha (spelt also -nandha), 'bound in a pair.' This word is not listed in A. index or P.Dict. as occurring in the Nikāyas; but it occurs also at M. iii, 289 {samatha-vipassanā). I have not found it elsewhere except at Pṭs. ii, 98 (Yuganandha-vagga), which chapter is based on our sutta, there quoted and commented on. Cf. Mil. P. 117 (yamaka-yamakā); VM. 149 (dhamma); UdA. 153 (yuga-nandha-samatha-vipassanā-balena); 398 (samathā-vipassanaɱ yuga-naddhaɱ yojetvā); also 177.

[2] Comy. 'the first supramundane Path.'

[3] Anusayā. Cf. K.S. ii, 167 n. At A. iv, 9 seven are given. cf. A. i, 44 = G.S. i, 46.

[4] See note above. Apparently to be taken in the sense of samasīsa (synchronism). Comy. expl. 'at the moment of attainment he calms the activities; at the moment of calming the activities he makes the attainment. How? He attains the first musing. Rising from that he calms the activities and attains the second musing. Rising from that, and so on. . . .'

[5] Here our text reads dhamm'uddhacca-vigahītamanā, (?) hoti. So ... But Sinh. text -vigahitaɱ mānaɱ; Comy. only viggahitaɱ. But the passage in Pṭs. ii, 93 (ref. to above) has -viggahitaɱ mānasaɱ hoti (which I follow). Apparently we should begin the next sentence with Hoti so samayo (as does Comy.) or repeat hoti. The process is explained at length Pṭs. ii, 100 jf.


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