Anguttara Nikaya


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Aŋguttaranikāyo
Catukkanipāto
XIX: Yodhajīva Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
The Book of the Fours
Chapter XIX: Fignthing Man[1]

Sutta 181

Mahā Padesadesanā Suttaɱ

Fighting Man

Translated from the Pali by F. L. Woodward, M.A.

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[1][than] Thus have I heard:

On a certain occasion the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī.

Then the Exalted One addressed the monks, saying:

'Monks.'

'Yes, lord,' they replied,
and the Exalted One said:

'Monks, possessed of four qualities
a fighting-man is worthy of a rajah,
is a possession of a rajah,
is reckoned an attribute of a rajah.

What are the four?

Herein, monks, a fighting-man is skilled in points of vantage,
he is a far-shooter,
a shooter like lightning
and a piercer[2] of a huge object.[3]

Possessed of these four qualities
a fighting-man is worthy of a rajah,
is a possession of a rajah,
is reckoned an attribute of a rajah.

In like manner, monks,
possessed of four qualities
a monk is worthy of respect,
of offerings and gifts,
of being saluted with clasped hands upraised,
a field of merit
unsurpassed for the world.

What are the four?

[178] In this case a monk is skilled in points of vantage,
he is a far-shooter,
a shooter like lightning
and a piercer of a huge object.

Now in what way is a monk skilled in points of vantage?

In this case a monk is virtuous,
he dwells restrained
with the restraint of the Obligations;
perfect in the practice of right conduct
he sees danger in the slightest faults;
he takes up
and trains himself
in the rules of morality.[4]|| ||

Thus is a monk skilled in points of vantage.

And how, monks, is a monk a far-shooter?

Herein whatsoever object,
be it past,
future
or present,
of the self or external to the self,
gross or subtle,
mean or exalted,
far or near, -
every object in short that he beholds,
he looks upon it,
as it really is,
with right wisdom,
thus:

This is not of me.

Not this am I.

Not for me is this the self.

Whatsoever feeling,
be it past,
future
or present,
of the self or external to the self,
gross or subtle,
mean or exalted,
far or near, -
every feeling in short that he beholds,
he looks upon it,
as it really is,
with right wisdom,
thus:

This is not of me.

Not this am I.

Not for me is this the self.

Whatsoever perception,
be it past,
future
or present,
of the self or external to the self,
gross or subtle,
mean or exalted,
far or near, -
every perception in short that he beholds,
he looks upon it,
as it really is,
with right wisdom,
thus:

This is not of me.

Not this am I.

Not for me is this the self.

Whatsoever activity,
be it past,
future
or present,
of the self or external to the self,
gross or subtle,
mean or exalted,
far or near, -
every activity in short that he beholds,
he looks upon it,
as it really is,
with right wisdom,
thus:

This is not of me.

Not this am I.

Not for me is this the self.

Whatsoever consciousness he has,
be it past,
future
or present,
of the self or external to the self,
gross or subtle,
mean or exalted,
far or near, -
- everything in short of which he is conscious, -,
he looks upon it,
as it really is,
with right wisdom,
thus:

This is not of me.

Not this am I.

Not for me is this the self.

That is how a monk is a far-shooter.

And how is a monk a shooter like lightning?

Herein a monk understands as it really is:

This is Ill.

This is the arising of Ill.

This is the ending of Ill.

This is the practice going to the ending of Ill.

Thus is he a shooter like lightning.

And how is a monk a piercer of a huge object?

Herein a monk pierces through the huge mass of nescience.

That is how he is a piercer of a huge object.

Possessed of these four qualities a monk is worthy of respect,
of offerings and gifts,
of being saluted with clasped hands upraised,
a field of merit
unsurpassed for the world.

 


[1] cf. A. i, 284 = G.S. i, 263; A. iii, 84. Comy. calls this chapter Brāhmaṇa-vagga.

[2] Padāletā, or 'smasher.'

[3] See below, Ī 196.

[4] See Ī 7 of Ch. IV.


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