Anguttara Nikaya


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Aŋguttaranikāyo
Catukkanipāto

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
The Book of the Fours

Ṭhānāni Sutta

Sutta 193

Bhaddiya

Translated from the Pali by F. L. Woodward, M.A.

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[1] THUS have I heard:

On a certain occasion the Exalted One was staying near Vesali,
in Great Wood,
at the Peaked-roof House.

Then Bhaddiya the Licchavī came to visit the Exalted One, and on coming to him saluted him and sat down at one side.

So seated Bhaddiya the Licchavī said this to the Exalted One:

'I have heard, sir, that Gotama the recluse is a juggler,
that he knows a trick of glamour
by which he entices away the followers
of those holding other views.[1]

Now, sir, as to those who say:

"Gotama the recluse is a juggler
who knows a trick of glamour
by which he entices away the followers
of those holding other views," -

pray, sir, do such express the views of the Exalted One
and not misrepresent the Exalted One by what is not a fact?

Do they speak in accordance with Dhamma?

Does one who is of his Dhamma,
who follows his views,
fall into blame therefor?

Sir, we would not misrepresent the Exalted One.'[2]

'Come now, Bhaddiya!

Be not misled by report[3] or tradition or hearsay.

Be not misled by proficiency in the Collections,[4]
nor by mere logic or inference,
nor after considering reasons,
nor after reflection on and approval of some theory,
nor because it fits becoming,[5] nor by the thought:

"The recluse is revered by us."

But, Bhaddiya, when you know for yourself:

These things are unprofitable,
these things are blameworthy,
these things are censured by the intelligent,
these things,
when performed and undertaken,
conduce to loss and sorrow, -
then indeed, Bhaddiya, do you reject them.

Now what think you, Bhaddiya?

When greed arises in a man's self,
does it arise to his profit or to his loss?

'To his loss, sir.'

[201] 'Does not this man,
thus become greedy,
being overcome by greed
and losing control of his mind, -
does he not kill a living creature,
steal,
go after another's wife,
tell lies
and lead another into such a state
as[6] causes his loss and sorrow for a long time?

'He does so, sir.'

'Now what think you, Bhaddiya?

When malice arises in a man's self,
does it arise to his profit or to his loss?

'To his loss, sir.'

'Does not this man,
thus become malicious,
being overcome by malice
and losing control of his mind, -
does he not kill a living creature,
steal,
go after another's wife,
tell lies
and lead another into such a state
as causes his loss and sorrow for a long time?

'He does so, sir.'

'Now what think you, Bhaddiya?

When delusion arises in a man's self,
does it arise to his profit or to his loss?

'To his loss, sir.'

'Does not this man,
thus become deluded,
being overcome by delusion
and losing control of his mind, -
does he not kill a living creature,
steal,
go after another's wife,
tell lies
and lead another into such a state
as causes his loss and sorrow for a long time?

'He does so, sir.'

'Now what think you, Bhaddiya?

When violence[7] is added to these in a man's self, do they arise to his profit or his loss?

'To his loss, sir.'

'And, Bhaddiya, does not this man,
thus become violent,
being overcome by violence
and losing control of his mind, -
does he not kill a living creature,
steal,
go after another's wife,
tell lies
and lead another into such a state
as causes his loss and sorrow for a long time?

'He does so, sir.'

'Then what think you, Bhaddiya?

Are these things profitable or unprofitable?'

'Unprofitable, sir.'

'Are they blameworthy or not?'

'Blameworthy, sir.'

'Are they censured by the intelligent or not?

'They are censured, sir.'

'If performed and undertaken, do they conduce to loss and sorrow,
or how is it?

'They do conduce to loss and sorrow, sir.

It is just so, me thinks.'

'So then, Bhaddiya, as to my words to you just now: -

'Come now, Bhaddiya!

Be not misled by report or tradition or hearsay.

Be not misled by proficiency in the Collections,
nor by mere logic or inference,
nor after considering reasons,
nor after reflection on and approval of some theory,
nor because it fits becoming, nor by the thought:

"The recluse is [202] revered by us."

But, Bhaddiya, when you know for yourself:

These things are unprofitable,
these things are blameworthy,
these things are censured by the intelligent,
these things,
when performed and undertaken,
conduce to loss and sorrow, -
then indeed, Bhaddiya, do you reject them," -

such was my reason for uttering those words.

'Come now, Bhaddiya!

Be not misled by report or tradition or hearsay.

Be not misled by proficiency in the Collections,
nor by mere logic or inference,
nor after considering reasons,
nor after reflection on and approval of some theory,
nor because it fits becoming, nor by the thought:

"The recluse is revered by us."

But, Bhaddiya, when you know for yourself:

These things are unprofitable,
these things are blameworthy,
these things are censured by the intelligent,
these things,
when performed and undertaken,
conduce to loss and sorrow, -
then indeed, Bhaddiya, do you reject them," -

But if at any time ye know of yourselves:

These things are profitable,
these things are not blameworthy,
these things are praised by the intelligent,
these things,
when performed and undertaken,
conduce to profit and happiness, -
then, Bhaddiya, undertake them and remain doing them.

Now what think you, Bhaddiya?

When freedom from greed arises in a man's self,
does it arise to his profit or to his loss?'

'To his profit, sir.'

'Does not this man,
not being greedy,
not overcome by greed,
but having his mind under control, -
does he not abstain from killing living creatures,
does he not abstain from stealing,
does he not abstain from going after another's wife,
does he not abstain from telling lies
and does he not abstain from leading another into such a state
as will be to his loss and sorrow for a long time?'

'He does, sir.'

'Now what think you, Bhaddiya?

When freedom from malice arises in a man's self,
does it arise to his profit or to his loss?'

'To his profit, sir.'

'Does not this man,
not being malicious,
not overcome by malace,
but having his mind under control, -
does he not abstain from killing living creatures,
does he not abstain from stealing,
does he not abstain from going after another's wife,
does he not abstain from telling lies
and does he not abstain from leading another into such a state
as will be to his loss and sorrow for a long time?'

'He does, sir.'

'Now what think you, Bhaddiya?

When freedom from delusion arises in a man's self,
does it arise to his profit or to his loss?'

'To his profit, sir.'

'Does not this man,
not being deluded,
not overcome by delusion,
but having his mind under control, -
does he not abstain from killing living creatures,
does he not abstain from stealing,
does he not abstain from going after another's wife,
does he not abstain from telling lies
and does he not abstain from leading another into such a state
as will be to his loss and sorrow for a long time?'

'He does, sir.'

'Now what think you, Bhaddiya?

When freedom from the violence that goes with these arises in a man's self,
does it arise to his profit or to his loss?

'To his profit, sir.'

'Does not this man,
being freed from the violence that goes with these,
not being overcome by that violence,[8]
but having his mind under control, -
does he not abstain from killing living creatures,
does he not abstain from stealing,
does he not abstain from going after another's wife,
does he not abstain from telling lies
and does he not abstain from leading another into such a state
as will be to his loss and sorrow for a long time?'

'He does, sir.'

'Now what think you, Bhaddiya?

Are these things profitable or unprofitable?

[203] 'Profitable, sir.'

'Are they blameworthy or blameless?

'Blameless, sir.'

'Are they censured or praised by the intelligent?'

'They are praised, sir.'

'When performed and undertaken,
do they conduce to profit and happiness or not,
or how is it?

'They do conduce to pront and happiness, sir.

It is just so, methinks.'

'So then, Bhaddiya, as to my words to you just now:

'Come now, Bhaddiya!

Be not misled by report or tradition or hearsay.

Be not misled by proficiency in the Collections,
nor by mere logic or inference,
nor after considering reasons,
nor after reflection on and approval of some theory,
nor because it fits becoming, nor by the thought:

"The recluse is revered by us."

But, Bhaddiya, when you know for yourself:

These things are unprofitable,
these things are blameworthy,
these things are censured by the intelligent,
these things,
when performed and undertaken,
conduce to loss and sorrow, -
then indeed, Bhaddiya, do you reject them," -

But if at any time ye know of yourselves:

These things are profitable,
these things are not blameworthy,
these things are praised by the intelligent,
these things,
when performed and undertaken,
conduce to profit and happiness, -
then, Bhaddiya, undertake them and remain doing them
-such was my reason for uttering those words.

Now, Bhaddiya, all worthy[9] men in the world incite a follower thus:

"Come, my good fellow!

Restrain greed and keep on doing so.

If you do that,
you won't do a greedy deed
with body, speech or thought.

Restrain malice and keep on doing so.

If you do that,
you won't do a malicious deed
with body, speech or thought.

Restrain delusion and keep on doing so.

do that,
you won't do a deluded deed
with body, speech or thought.

Restrain the violence that goes with them and keep on doing so.

.

If you keep on doing so,
you won't do a deed of violence
with body, speech and thought."'

At these words Bhaddiya the Licchavī exclaimed to the Exalted One:

'It is wonderful, sir!

It is marvellous!

[10]Just as if, master Gotama,
one should raise the fallen
or show forth the hidden,
or point the way to him that wanders astray,
or hold up a light in the darkness
to that they who have eyes may behold objects, —
even so in divers ways
has dhamma been set forth by the worthy Gotama.

I do go for refuge to the worthy Gotama!

May the Exalted One accept me as his follower
from this day forth
so long as life may last,
as one who has gone to him for refuge.'

'But, Bhaddiya, did I say to you:

"Come, Bhaddiya, be my follower.

I will be your teacher"?

'No, sir.'

'Then, Bhaddiya, it seems that some recluse and brahmins are vain and empty liars,
and misrepresent me contrary to facts
as being one who holds such a view,
who proclaims such a view, in saying:

"Gotama the recluse is a juggler.

He knows [204] a trick of glamour
by which he entices away the followers
of those holding other views."'

'A goodly thing, sir,
is this enticing trick of glamour.

A lovely thing, sir,
is this enticing trick of glamour.

I wish, sir, that my dear[11] kinsmen
could be converted[12] by this enticement.

Surely it would be to the profit and happiness
of my dear kinsmen
for a long time.

Sir, if all the nobles could be conveted by this enticement,
it would be to the profit and happiness of all nobles
for a long time.

Sir, if all the brahmins could be conveted by this enticement,
it would be to the profit and happiness of all brahmins
for a long time.

Sir, if all the the Vessa could be conveted by this enticement,
it would be to the profit and happiness of all Vessas
for a long time.

Sir, if all the Sudras could be converted by this enticement,
it would be to the profit and happiness of all Sudras
for a long time.'

'So it would, Bhaddiya.

So it would, Bhaddiya.

If all the nobles could be conveted
to the abandoning of unprofitable things
and to the undertaking of profitable things,
it would be to the profit and happiness of all nobles
for a long time.

If all the brahmins could be conveted
to the abandoning of unprofitable things
and to the undertaking of profitable things,
it would be to the profit and happiness of all brahmins
for a long time.

If all the the Vessa could be conveted
to the abandoning of unprofitable things
and to the undertaking of profitable things,
it would be to the profit and happiness of all Vessas
for a long time.

If all the Sudras could be converted
to the abandoning of unprofitable things
and to the undertaking of profitable things,
it would be to the profit and happiness of all Sudras
for a long time.'

If the world,
with its devas,
its Maras,
its Brahmas,
with its host of recluses and brahmins,
its devas and mankind,
were to be converted to the abandoning of unprofitable things
and to the undertaking of profitable things,
it would be to their profit and happiness
for a long time.

Why, Bhaddiya, if these great sal-trees[13] could be converted by this enticement,
it would be to their profit and happiness
for a long time, -
that is, if they could think,[14] -
to say nothing of one who has become human.'

 


[1] The same accusation is made at M. i, 375 by Upali, the housefather.

[2] Cf. S. ii, 33, 41, etc.

[3] Cf. A. i, 190, advice to the Kālāmas; G.S. i, 171 [AN 3.65 Woodward] n.

[4] Piṭaka-sampādanena. There were as yet no written pitakas, and it is doubtful whether the word was even used at the time.

[5] Bhavya-rūpatāya - i.e., not because you think it agrees with my (or a) doctrine of 'becoming.' 'Recluse' possibly refers to himself.

[6] Yaɱ'sa hoti for yaɱ assa hoti. Comy.

[7] Sārambho (not saɱrambha but sa-ārambha, 'accompanied by violence') is here added to the other three qualities at A. i. Comy. def. as 'having the characteristics of going still further' in any one of these vices.

[8] Text wrongly asārambhena; while just above Sinh. text has asāraddho for asārambho.

[9] Sappurisā = Ariyā. Santo may be participial or 'goodly.' Text should read samādapenti.

[10] Pe here in text means 'add the usual formula about showing a light,' etc. [Ed.: Reconstructed here.]

[11] Sinh. text reads māyāya me, bhante, which seems a corruption of piyā of text, or perhaps we should add it after āvattaṇiyā.

[12] Āvaṭṭeyyuɱ (lit. 'would turn round'), perhaps a play on the word āvaṭṭanī.

[13] Texts ime ce pi; Comy. dve pi, and adds that at the time of speaking two such trees stood by.

[14] The punctuation of text is misleading here.


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