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Aŋguttaranikāyo
Catukkanipāto
XXI: Sappurisa Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
The Book of the Fours
Chapter XXI: The Worthy Man

Sutta 204

Catuttha Sappurisa Suttaṃ

The Ten Deeds

Translated from the Pali by F. L. Woodward, M.A.

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[1] Thus have I heard:

On a certain occasion the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī.

Then the Exalted One addressed the monks, saying:

'Monks.'

'Yes, lord,' they replied,
and the Exalted One said:

'Monks, I will teach you the unworthy man
and the still more unworthy man.

I will teach you the worthy man
and the still more worthy man.

Do ye listen to it carefully.

Apply your minds and I will speak.'

'Yes, lord,'
replied those monks to the Exalted One.

The Exalted One said this:

'And of what sort, monks, is the unworthy man?

Herein a certain person
is one who takes life,
steals,
is a wrong-doer in sense-desires,
is a liar,
is of slanderous spech,
is of bitter speech,
is an idle babbler,
is covetous,
is of a malicious heart,
has wrong view.

This one is called
"the unworthy man."

And of what sort, monks, is the still more unworthy man?

Herein a certain person
himself is one who takes life,
and further encourages another to take life;

himself is one who steals,
and further encourages another to steal;

himself is one who is a wrong-doer in sense-desires,
and further encourages another to be a wrong-doer in sense-desires;

himself is one who is a liar,
and further encourages another to be a liar;

himself is one who is of slanderous spech,
and further encourages another to be one who is of slanderous spech;

himself is one who is of bitter speech,
and further encourages another to be one who is of bitter speech;

himself is one who is an idle babbler,
and further encourages another to be one who is an idle babbler.

himself is one who is covetous,
and further encourages another to be one who is covetous.

himself is one who is of a malicious heart,
and further encourages another to be one who is of a malicious heart.

himself is one who has wrong view,
and further encourages another to be one who has wrong view.

This one is called
"the still more unworthy man."

And of what sort, monks, is the worthy man?

Herein a certain person
is one who abstains from taking life,
stealing,
one who abstains from wrong-doing in sense-desires,
one who abstains from lying,
one who abstains from slanderous spech,
one who abstains from bitter speech,
one who abstains from idle babble,
one who abstains from covetousness,
one who abstains from maliciousness of heart,
one who has right view.

This one is called
"the worthy man."

And of what sort, monks, is the still more worthy man?

Herein a certain person
not only himself abstains from taking life,
but also encourages another
to abstain from taking life;

not only himself abstains from stealing,
but also encourages another
to abstain from stealing;

not only himself abstains from wrong-doing in sense-desires,
but also encourages another
to abstain from wrong-doing in sense-desires;

not only himself abstains from lying,
but also encourages another
to abstain from lying;

not only himself abstains from slanderous spech,
but also encourages another
to abstain from slanderous spech;

not only himself abstains from bitter speech,
but also encourages another
to abstain from bitter speech;

not only himself abstains from idle babble,
but also encourages another
to abstain from idle babble;

not only himself abstains from covetousness,
but also encourages another
to abstain from covetousness;

not only himself abstains from maliciousness of heart,
but also encourages another
to abstain from maliciousness of heart;

not only himself has right view,
but also encourages another
to attain right view.

This one is called
"the still more worthy man." '


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