Anguttara Nikaya


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Anguttara Nikāya
Pañcaka Nipāta
8. Yodhājīva Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
The Book of the Fives
VIII. The Warrior

Chapter VIII
The Warrior

Sutta 78

Dutiya Anāgatabhaya Suttaṃ

Fear in the Way (b)

Translated by E. M. Hare

Copyright The Pali Text Society
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[1][than] Thus have I heard:

Once the Exalted One dwelt near Sāvatthī, at Jeta Grove, in Anāthapiṇḍika's Park;
and there he addressed the monks,
saying:

'Monks.'

'Yes, lord,' they replied;
and the Exalted One said:

'Monks, there are these five fears in the way[1]
from contemplating which
the earnest,
ardent,
resolute monk,
ought to live
just to attain the unattained,
to master the unmastered,
to realize the unrealized.

What five?

Take the case of a monk who reflects thus:

"I am now young,
a mere youth,
black-haired
and blessed with the beauty of youth,
the heyday of youth,[2] the prime of youth;
but time will be
when old age shall touch this body:
and when grown old
and overcome by age,
not easy is it
to turn to the Buddhas' word,
not easy things
are forest-wilderness,
the outland bed and seat, to seek.

Ere[3] that state come to me —
unwelcome,
undesired,
unloved —
lo! I will put forth energy
against that time
even to attain the unattained,
to master the unmastered, [93] to realize the unrealized,
and o! that state possessed
I will dwell comforted even when old.

Monks, this is the first fear in the way
from contemplating which
the earnest,
ardent,
resolute monk,
ought to live
just to attain the unattained,
to master the unmastered,
to realize the unrealized.

 

 

Again take the case of a monk who reflects thus:

I have health and well-being,
a good digestion
which is neither over-cold
nor over-heated,
but even and suitable for striving;[4] but time will be
when sickness shall touch this body;
and sick and ill,
not easy is it
to turn to the Buddhas' word,
not easy things
are forest-wilderness,
the outland bed and seat, to seek.

Ere that state come to me —
unwelcome,
undesired,
unloved —
lo! I will put forth energy
against that time
even to attain the unattained,
to master the unmastered, to realize the unrealized,
and o! that state possessed
I will dwell comforted even when sick.

Monks, this is the second fear in the way
from contemplating which
the earnest,
ardent,
resolute monk,
ought to live
just to attain the unattained,
to master the unmastered,
to realize the unrealized.

 

 

Again take the case of a monk who reflects thus:

Now is there no famine
and crops are good,
food is easy to get
and it is easy
to keep oneself going
by gleanings and favours;
but time will be
when there is a famine,
bad crops,
and difficulty in getting food,
nor will it be easy
to keep oneself going
by gleanings and favours;
and the famine-stricken men
will move to where there is ample food,
and there one will dwell in a crowd
and a throng:
and where such conditions are,
not easy is it
to turn to the Buddhas' word,
not easy things
are forest-wilderness,
the outland bed and seat, to seek.

Ere that state come to me —
unwelcome,
undesired,
unloved —
lo! I will put forth energy
against that time
even to attain the unattained,
to master the unmastered, to realize the unrealized,
and o! that state possessed
I will dwell comforted even in time of famine.

Monks, this is the third fear in the way
from contemplating which
the earnest,
ardent,
resolute monk,
ought to live
just to attain the unattained,
to master the unmastered,
to realize the unrealized.

 

 

Again take the case of a monk who reflects thus:

Now men dwell in friendly fellowship together,
as mingled milk and water,
they do not quarrel,
but look upon one another with friendly eye;
but time will be
when fear is about,
perils of robbers,
and the country-folk mount their carts
and drive away,
and the fear-stricken men
will move away
to where there is safety,
and there one will live in crowds
and throngs:
and where such conditions are,
not easy is it
to turn to the Buddhas' word,
not easy things
are forest-wilderness,
the outland bed and seat, to seek.

Ere that state come to me —
unwelcome,
undesired,
unloved —
lo! I will put forth energy
against that time
even to attain the unattained,
to master the unmastered, to realize the unrealized,
and o! that state possessed
I will dwell comforted even in time of fear.

Monks, this is the fourth fear in the way
from contemplating which
the earnest,
ardent,
resolute monk,
ought to live
just to attain the unattained,
to master the unmastered,
to realize the unrealized.

 

 

Moreover, monks, the monk reflects thus:

Now the Order lives in friendly fellowship together,
finding comfort in one teaching;
but the time will come
when the Order will be rent:
and when that happens,
not easy is it to turn to the Buddhas' word,
not easy things
are forest-wilderness,
the outland [84] bed and seat, to seek.

Ere that state come to me —
unwelcome,
undesired,
unloved —
lo! I will put forth energy
against that time
even to attain the unattained,
to master the unmastered, to realize the unrealized,
and o! that state possessed
I will dwell comforted even though the Order be rent.

Monks, this is the fifth fear in the way
from contemplating which
the earnest,
ardent,
resolute monk,
ought to live
just to attain the unattained,
to master the unmastered,
to realize the unrealized.

 

 

Monks, these are the five fears in the way
from contemplating which
the earnest,
ardent,
resolute monk,
ought to live
just to attain the unattained,
to master the unmastered,
to realize the unrealized.

 


[1] This is the same as in the preceding sutia, but with āaraññaka, forest gone, omitted.

[2] See above, Ī 54.

[3] Following the Comy. I have punctuated differently from the text.

[4] Cf. above, Ī 63 and Ī 54 for the following passages.


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