Anguttara Nikaya


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Anguttara Nikāya
Pañcaka Nipāta
8. Yodhājīva Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
The Book of the Fives
IX. The Elder

Chapter VIII
The Warrior

Sutta 80

Catuttha Anāgatabhaya Suttaɱ

Fear in the Way (d)

Translated by E. M. Hare

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[1][than] Thus have I heard:

Once the Exalted One dwelt near Sāvatthī, at Jeta Grove, in Anāthapiṇḍika's Park;
and there he addressed the monks,
saying:

'Monks.'

'Yes, lord,' they replied;
and the Exalted One said:

'Monks, these five fears in the way,
which have not yet arisen,
will arise in the future.

Be ye fully awake for them;
and, being awake,
strive to get rid of them.

What five?

Monks, there will be,
in the long road of the future,
monks who long for fine[1] robes;
and they, with this longing,
will leave the ways of wearing rags,
will leave the forest wilderness,
the out-land bed and seat;
will move to village,
town
or rajah's capital[2]
and make their dwelling there;
and because of a robe,
they will commit many things
unseemly,
unfit.[3]

Monks, this is the first fear in the way which,
though not yet risen,
will arise in the future.

Be ye fully awake for it;
and being awake,
strive to get rid of it.

 

 

Again, monks, there will be,
in the long road of the future,
monks who will long for rich[1] alms-food;
and they, with this longing,
will leave the ways of the common round,
the forest wilderness,
the out-land bed and seat;
will move to village,
town
or rajah's capital
and make their dwelling there;
seeking out, as it were
with the tip of the tongue,
tasty morsels;
and because of alms-food,
they will commit many things
unseemly,
unfit.

[87] Monks, this is the second fear in the way which,
though not yet risen,
will arise in the future.

Be ye fully awake for it;
and being awake,
strive to get rid of it.

 

 

Again, monks, there will be,
in the long road of the future,
monks who will long for a goodly bed and seat;
and they, with this longing,
will leave the ways of the tree-root abode,
the forest wilderness,
the out-land bed and seat;
will move to village,
town
or rajah's capital
and make their dwelling there;
and because of a bed and seat,
they will commit things
unseemly,
unfit.

Monks, this is the third fear in the way which,
though not yet risen,
will arise in the future.

Be ye fully awake for it;
and being awake,
strive to get rid of it.

 

 

Again, monks, there will be,
in the long road of the future,
monks who will live in company
with nuns
and novices in training;
and when this shall be,
it may be expected
that the monks will take no delight
in leading the godly life;
and either they will commit some foul act
or give up the training
and return to the lower life.

Monks, this is the fourth fear in the way which,
though not yet risen,
will arise in the future.

Be ye fully awake for it;
and being awake,
strive to get rid of it.

 

 

Moreover, monks, there will be
in the long road of the future
monks who will live in company
with the park folk
and novices;
and when this shall be,
it may be expected
that they will live and feast themselves
on the plenty of hoarded stocks[4]
and will mark out their lands and crops.

Monks, this is the fifth fear in the way which,
though not yet risen,
will arise in the future.

Be ye fully awake for it;
and being awake,
strive to get rid of it.

 

 

Monks, these are the five fears in the way,
which have not yet arisen,
which will arise in the future.

Be ye fully awake for them;
and, being awake,
strive to get rid of them.

 


[1] Kalyāṇa. Comy. sundara.

[2] Rājadhāni.

[3] This passage recurs at S. ii, 194 (quoted at Mil. 401).

[4] Sannidhi-kāraka-paribhoga; this was not permitted, see Vin. ii, 206 ff.; D. iii, 235 (impossible for arahants); A. iv, 370; M. i, 523.


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