Anguttara Nikaya


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U-N-A-B-R-I-D-G-E-D

Anguttara Nikāya
Pañcaka Nipāta
15. Tikaṇḍaki Vaggo

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
The Book of the Fives

Chapter XV: Three-thorn Grove

Sutta 142

Ārabhati Suttaṃ

He Does Amiss

Translated by E. M. Hare

Copyright The Pali Text Society
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[1] Thus have I heard:

Once the Exalted One dwelt near Sāvatthī;
and there he addressed the monks, saying:

'Monks.'

'Yes, lord,' they replied;
and the Exalted One said:

'Monks, these five persons are found living in the world.

What five?

There is the case, monks,
of a person who does amiss
and is dejected[1]
and knows not,
as it really is,
that mind-release,
that insight-release,
wherein for him these surges[2]
of evil and wrong states
end entirely;

there is one who does amiss
and is not dejected
and knows not,
as it really is,
that mind-release,
that insight-release,
wherein for him these surges
of evil and wrong states
end entirely;

one who does not amiss
but is dejected
and knows not,
as it really is,
that mind-release,
that insight-release,
wherein for him these surges
of evil and wrong states
end entirely;

one who does not amiss
and is not dejected
and knows not,
as it really is,
that mind-release,
that insight-release,
wherein for him these surges
of evil and wrong states
end entirely;

and there is one who does not amiss
and is not dejected
and knows,
as it really is,
that mind-release,
that insight-release,
wherein for him these surges
of evil and wrong states
end entirely.

 


 

There, monks, he who does amiss
and is dejected
and knows not,
as it really is,
that mind-release,
that insight-release,
wherein for him these surges
of evil and wrong states
end entirely;
this may be said of him:

Verily to the venerable one the cankers,
born of doing amiss,[3]
are discovered;
the cankers born of dejection wax:[ed1]
well were it for the venerable one
to rid himself of the cankers,
born of misdeeds,
to drive out the cankers,
born of dejection,
and to make mind and insight more-become:
then will the venerable one become
the very same with this fifth person.

 

 

And he who does amiss
and is not dejected
and knows not,
as it really is,
that mind-release,
that insight-release,
wherein for him these surges
of evil and wrong states
end entirely;
this may [125] be said of him:

Verily to the venerable one the cankers,
born of doing amiss,
are discovered;
but the cankers born of dejection wax not:
well were it for the venerable one
to rid himself of the cankers,
born of misdeeds,
and to make mind and insight more-become:
then will the venerable one become
the very same with this fifth person.

 

 

And who does not amiss
but is dejected
and knows not,
as it really is,
that mind-release,
that insight-release,
wherein for him these surges
of evil and wrong states
end entirely;
this may be said of him:

Verily to the venerable one the cankers,
born of doing amiss,
are not discovered;
but the cankers born of dejection wax:
well were it for the venerable one
to rid himself of the cankers,
born of dejection,
and to make mind and insight more-become:
then will the venerable one become
the very same with this fifth person.

 

 

and he who does not amiss
and is not dejected
and knows not,
as it really is,
that mind-release,
that insight-release,
wherein for him these surges
of evil and wrong states
end entirely;
this may be said of him:

Verily to the venerable one the cankers,
born of doing amiss,
are not discovered;
and the cankers born of dejection wax not:
well were it for the venerable one
to make mind and insight more-become:
then will the venerable one become
the very same with this fifth person.

 

 

Thus verily, monks,
these four persons with this fifth,
being so exhorted,
so counselled,
gradually win to the destruction of the cankers.'

 


[1] Ārabhati ca vippaṭisārī ca. Comy. āpatti-vītikkama-vasena ārabhati c'eva tappaccayā ca vippaṭisārī hoti. Ārabhati is lit. to start (doing something); and vippaṭisārī: strongly remembering something against (oneself), so generally 'remorse.' Cf. Pug. 64.

[2] Te uppannā.

[3] The text reads ārabbhajā, but S.e. with v.l. and Comy. ārambhajā

 


[ed1] Hare's construction of these goes: "...the cankers, born of doing amiss, are discovered; born of dejection they wax...". This creates problems in the following sections which he has abridged with the indication that this pattern should be followed. I have altered his rendering to parallel the Pali.


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