Anguttara Nikaya


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Anguttara Nikāya
Pañcaka Nipāta
XXI. Kimbila-Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
The Book of the Fives

Chapter XXI
Kimbila

Sutta 205

Mental Barrenness[1]

Translated by E. M. Hare

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[1] THUS have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī.

There the Exalted One addressed the monks, saying:

'Monks.'

'Yes, lord,' they replied, and the Exalted One said:

'Monks, there are these five forms of mental barrenness.

What five?

Monks, suppose a monk has doubts and is perplexed[2] about the Teacher,
is not certain nor sure in him;
monks, whoso thus doubts and is perplexed about the Teacher,
his heart inclines not to ardour,
devotion,
perseverance,
exertion.

Where the heart does not so incline,
it is the first form of mental barrenness.

Again, suppose a monk has doubts and is perplexed about Dhamma,
is not certain nor sure in it;
monks, whoso thus doubts and is perplexed about the Dhamma,
his heart inclines not to ardour,
devotion,
perseverance,
exertion.

Where the heart does not so incline,
it is the second form of mental barrenness.

Again, suppose a monk has doubts and is perplexed about the Order,
is not certain nor sure in it;
monks, whoso thus doubts and is perplexed about the Order,
his heart inclines not to ardour,
devotion,
perseverance,
exertion.

Where the heart does not so incline,
it is the third form of mental barrenness.

Again, suppose a monk has doubts and is perplexed about the training,
is not certain nor sure in it;
monks, whoso thus doubts and is perplexed about the training,
his heart inclines not to ardour,
devotion,
perseverance,
exertion.

Where the heart does not so incline,
it is the fourth form of mental barrenness.

Again, suppose a monk becomes angry with his fellows in the godly life,
displeased with them,
upset about them,
becomes as a barren Waste for them;
monks, whoso becomes angry with his fellows in the godly life,
displeased with them,
upset about them,
becomes as a barren Waste for them
his heart inclines not to ardour,
devotion,
perseverance,
exertion.

Where the heart does not so incline,
it is the fifth form of mental barrenness.

Verily, monks, these are the five forms of mental barrenness.'

 


[1] Cf. D. iii, 237; M. i, 101; A. iv, 460; Comy. observes that it is a stubbornness of heart; dust (in the eyes), kacavara-bhāva stumbling, khāṇuka-bhāva..

[2] Vicikicchati. Comy. vicinanto kicchati, dukkhaɱ āpajjaii, vinicchituɱ na sakkoti.


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