Anguttara Nikaya


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Anguttara Nikāya
Chakka-Nipata
I: Āhuneyya-Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
The Book of the Sixes
Chapter I: The Worthy

Sutta 1

Paṭhamā Huneyya Suttaṃ

Worthy of Offerings (a)

Namo tassa Bhagavato arahato sammāsambuddhassa.

Translated from the Pali by E.M. Hare.

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[1] Thus have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was dwelling near Sāvatthī,
at Jeta Grove,
in Anāthapiṇḍika's Park.

There the Exalted One addressed the monks, saying:

'Monks.'

'Yes, lord,' they replied, and the Exalted One said:

'Monks, a monk who follows six things is worthy of offerings,
worthy of gifts,
worthy of oblations,
meet to be reverently saluted,
the world's peerless field for merit.

What six?

Monks,[1] herein a monk
on seeing a form with the eye
is neither elated nor depressed,
but abides in poise,[2]
mindful and self-possessed;

on hearing a sound with the ear
is neither elated nor depressed,
but abides in poise,
mindful and self-possessed;

on smelling a smell with the nose
is neither elated nor depressed,
but abides in poise,
mindful and self-possessed;

on tasting a taste with the tongue
is neither elated nor depressed,
but abides in poise,
mindful and self-possessed;

on touching a touchable with the body
is neither elated nor depressed,
but abides in poise,
mindful and self-possessed;

on becoming aware of an idea with the mind
is neither elated nor depressed,
but abides in poise,
mindful and self-possessed.

Verily, monks, a monk who follows these six things is worthy of offerings,
worthy of gifts,
worthy of oblations,
meet to be reverently saluted,
the world's peerless field for merit.'

Thus spake the Exalted One;
and with their hearts lifted up
those monks rejoiced exceedingly
in the word of the Exalted One.

 


[1] Cf. D. iii, 281; M. iii, 240; A. v, 30; ii, 198

[2] Comy. observes that this state is not from want of noticing the object nor from not knowing about it, but from composure.


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