Anguttara Nikaya


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Anguttara Nikāya
Chakka-Nipata
II: Sārāṇīya-Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
The Book of the Sixes
Chapter II: Be Considerate

Sutta 14

Bhaddaka Suttaṃ

The Lucky Fate

Translated from the Pali by E.M. Hare.

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[1] Thus have I heard:

Once the venerable Sāriputta was dwelling near Sāvatthī.

There the venerable Sāriputta addressed the monks, saying:

'Reverend sir!'

'Yes, friend,' they replied.

Then said the venerable Sāriputta:

'The more, reverend sirs, a monk thus fashions his life,
the more he fashions it to a luckless death,[1]
a luckless fate.[2]

And how, reverend sirs,
does a monk fashion his life
to a luckless death,
a luckless fate?

Consider, reverend sirs,
the monk who,[3]
finding delight in worldly activity,[4]
is delighted with worldly activity,
gets engrossed in the delight of worldly activity;
who, finding delight in talk,
is delighted with talk,
gets engrossed in the delight of talk;
who, finding delight in sleep,
is delighted with sleep,
gets engrossed in the delight of sleep;
who, finding delight in company,
is delighted with company,
gets engrossed in the delight of company;
who, finding delight in companionship
is delighted with companionship,
gets engrossed in the delight of companionship;
who, finding delight in vain fancies[5] -
is delighted with vain fancies,
gets engrossed in the delight of vain fancies;
[211] and thus, reverend sirs,
the more he so fashions his life,
the more he fashions it to a luckless death,
a luckless fete;
and of this monk it is said:

With his bundle of life[6]
he is greatly delighted;
he has not got rid of his bundle
for the utter ending of Ill.|| ||

But the more, reverend sirs,
a monk fashions his life in this manner,
the more he fashions it to a lucky death,
a lucky fate.

And how, reverend sirs,
does a monk fashion his life
to a lucky death,
a lucky fate?

Consider the monk who,
finding no delight in worldly activity,
is not delighted therewith,
gets not engrossed in the delight thereof;
who, finding no delight in talk,
is not delighted with talk,
gets not engrossed in the delight of talk;
who, finding no delight in sleep,
is not delighted with sleep,
gets not engrossed in the delight of sleep;
who, finding no delight in company,
is not delighted with company,
gets not engrossed in the delight of company;
who, finding no delight in companionship
is not delighted with companionship,
gets not engrossed in the delight of companionship;
who, finding no delight in vain fancies -
is not delighted with vain fancies,
gets not engrossed in the delight of vain fancies;
and thus the more he so fashions his life,
the more he fashions it to a lucky[7] death,
a lucky fate;
and of him it is said:

With Nibbāna he is greatly delighted;
he has got rid of his bundle of life
for the utter ending of Ill.

Fancy[8]-ensnarled, fawn-like[9] too fancy-fond,
Ne'er wins he blest Nibbāna's boundless peace:[10] But fancy-rid, intent on freedom's way,
He wins to blest Nibbāna's boundless peace.'

 


[1] Na bhaddakaṃ. Comy. na laddhakaṃ.

[2] Kāla-kiriyā; cf. A. i, 261 (G.S. i, 240).

[3] Cf. above V, Ī 89; A. iv, 331.

[4] Kamma.

[5] Papañca, or obsessions, or diffuseness. See Brethr. 343 n.

1 Samuel (Kings) 25.29: Yet a man is risen to pursue thee, and to seek thy soul: but the soul of my lord shall be bound in the bundle of life with the LORD thy God; and the souls of thine enemies, them shall he sling out, as out of the middle of a sling.
K.J.V.

p.p. explains it all — p.p.

[6] Sa-kkāyābhirato; kāya is from \/Ḥci, a heap or collection; Comy. says te-bhūmaka-vaṭṭaṃ. (Cf. the Biblical use of 'the bundle of life.' at 1 Samuel xxv, 29.) The sa- stresses the kāya of things material.

[7] Bhaddaka.

[8] These verses recur at Thag. 989-90 (Brethr. 343) as part of Sāriputta's aññā declaration.

[9] Mago.

[10] Yoga-kkhema, rest from labour; cf. kshema-yoga.


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