Anguttara Nikaya


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Aŋguttara Nikāya
Chakkanipata
V. Dhammika Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
The Book of the Sixes
Chapter V: Dhammika

Indriya Saŋvara Suttaṃ

Sutta 50

The Senses

Translated from the Pali by E.M. Hare.

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[1] Thus have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was dwelling near Sāvatthī,
at Jeta Grove,
in Anāthapiṇḍika's Park.

There the Exalted One addressed the monks, saying:

'Monks.'

'Yes, lord,' they replied, and the Exalted One said:

'Monks,[1] when sense-control is not,
virtue perforce[2] is destroyed
in him who has fallen[3] away
from sense-control;

when virtue is not,
right concentration is perforce destroyed
in him who has fallen away
from virtue;

when concentration is not,
true knowledge and insight are perforce destroyed
in him who has fallen away
from concentration;

when true knowledge and insight are not,
aversion and dispassion are perforce destroyed
in him who has fallen away
from knowledge and insight;

when aversion and dispassion are not,
emancipated knowledge and insight are perforce destroyed
in him who has fallen away
from aversion and dispassion.

Monks, imagine a tree
with branches and leaves fallen away:

Its buds come not to maturity,
nor its bark,
sapwood
or heart.

Even so, monks,
when the sense-control is not,
virtue perforce is destroyed
in him who has fallen away
from sense-control;

when virtue is not,
right concentration is perforce destroyed
in him who has fallen away
from virtue;

when concentration is not,
true knowledge and insight are perforce destroyed
in him who has fallen away
from concentration;

when true knowledge and insight are not,
aversion and dispassion are perforce destroyed
in him who has fallen away
from knowledge and insight;

when aversion and dispassion are not,
emancipated knowledge and insight are perforce destroyed
in him who has fallen away
from aversion and dispassion.

 


 

Monks, when there is sense-control,
virtue perforce thrives[4]
in him thriving in sense-control;

when there is virtue,
concentration perforce thrives
in him thriving in virtue;

when there is concentration,
true knowledge and insight perforce thrives
in him thriving in concentration;

when there is true knowledge and insight,
aversion and dispassion perforce thrives
in him thriving in true knowledge and insight;

when there is aversion and dispassion,
emancipated knowledge and insight perforce thrives
in him thriving in aversion and dispassion.

Monks, imagine a tree
with thriving branches and leaves:

Its buds,
bark,
sapwood
and heart
come to maturity.

Even so, monks, when there is sense-control,
virtue perforce thrives in him thriving in sense-control;

when there is virtue,
concentration perforce thrives
in him thriving in virtue;

when there is concentration,
true knowledge and insight perforce thrives
in him thriving in concentration;

when there is true knowledge and insight,
aversion and dispassion perforce thrives
in him thriving in true knowledge and insight;

when there is aversion and dispassion,
emancipated knowledge and insight perforce thrives
in him thriving in aversion and dispassion.

 


[1] See above V, Ī 24 and references there.

[2] Hat'upanisaṃ. Comy. -upanissayarjṃ On A.iv, 99: chinna-paceayo.Vi-panna, from Vpad, to fall. 6 Sampanna.

[3] Vi-panna, from \/Ḥpad, to fall.

[4] Sampanna.


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