Anguttara Nikaya


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Aŋguttara Nikāya
Chakkanipata
VII. Devatā Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
The Book of the Sixes
Chapter VII: The Devas

Sutta 69

Devatā Suttaɱ

The Deva

Translated from the Pali by E.M. Hare.

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[1] Thus have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was dwelling near Sāvatthī,
at Jeta Grove,
in Anāthapiṇḍika's Park.

There the Exalted One addressed the monks, saying:

'Monks.'

'Yes, lord,' they replied,
and the Exalted One said:

Now[1] when the night was well advanced,
a deva,
shedding rays of far-reaching loveliness
over Jeta Grove,
visited the Exalted One,
saluted
and stood at one side;
and, so standing,
he spoke thus to the Exalted One:

'Lord, there are these six thüigs
that lead not to a monk's falling away.

What six?

Reverence for Teacher,
reverence for the Dhamma
reverence for the Order,
reverence for the training,
grace in speech
and good friendship.

Lord, these six things
lead not to a monk's falling away.'

Thus spoke that deva
and the Teacher approved.

And the deva,
perceiving that the Master agreed,
saluted
and disappeared thence,
keeping the Exalted One on his right.

 


 

Now, at the end of that night,
the Exalted One addressed the monks
and told them:

'Monks, when the night was well advanced,
a deva,
shedding rays of far-reaching loveliness
over Jeta Grove,
visited me,
saluted
and stood at one side;
and, so standing,
he spoke thus:

"Lord, there are these six thüigs
that lead not to a monk's falling away.

What six?

Reverence for Teacher,
reverence for the Dhamma
reverence for the Order,
reverence for the training,
grace in speech
and good friendship.

Lord, these six things
lead not to a monk's falling away."

Thus spoke that deva and I approved.

And the deva,
perceiving that I agreed,
saluted
and disappeared thence,
keeping me on his right.'

 


 

[299] And when he had spoken,
the venerable Sāriputta saluted the Exalted One
and said:

'Lord, the meaning of the Exalted One's brief words
I thus understand in full:

Suppose, lord, a monk himself
reveres the Teacher
and praises such reverence;
he will instil such reverence
in others who lack it;
and of those who possess it
he will speak in praise,
justly,
truly
and timely.

So, too, lord, a monk himself
reveres Dhamma
and praises such reverence;
he will instil such reverence
in others who lack it;
and of those who possess it
he will speak in praise,
justly,
truly
and timely.

So, too, lord, a monk himself
reveres the Order,r
and praises such reverence;
he will instil such reverence
in others who lack it;
and of those who possess it
he will speak in praise,
justly,
truly
and timely.

So, too, lord, a monk himself
reveres the training
and praises such reverence;
he will instil such reverence
in others who lack it;
and of those who possess it
he will speak in praise,
justly,
truly
and timely.

So, too, lord, a monk himself
reveres grace in speech
and praises such reverence;
he will instil such reverence
in others who lack it;
and of those who possess it
he will speak in praise,
justly,
truly
and timely.

So, too, lord, a monk himself
reveres good friendship
and praises such reverence;
he will instil such reverence
in others who lack it;
and of those who possess it
he will speak in praise,
justly,
truly
and timely.

It is thus I understand in full the Exalted One's brief words.'

'Well said, well said, Sāriputta,
it is just as you say:

Suppose, Sāriputta, a monk himself
reveres the Teacher
and praises such reverence;
he will instil such reverence
in others who lack it;
and of those who possess it
he will speak in praise,
justly,
truly
and timely.

So, too, Sāriputta, a monk himself
reveres Dhamma
and praises such reverence;
he will instil such reverence
in others who lack it;
and of those who possess it
he will speak in praise,
justly,
truly
and timely.

So, too, Sāriputta, a monk himself
reveres the Order
and praises such reverence;
he will instil such reverence
in others who lack it;
and of those who possess it
he will speak in praise,
justly,
truly
and timely.

So, too, Sāriputta, a monk himself
reveres the training
and praises such reverence;
he will instil such reverence
in others who lack it;
and of those who possess it
he will speak in praise,
justly,
truly
and timely.

So, too, Sāriputta, a monk himself
reveres grace in speech
and praises such reverence;
he will instil such reverence
in others who lack it;
and of those who possess it
he will speak in praise,
justly,
truly
and timely.

So, too, Sāriputta, a monk himself
reveres good friendship
and praises such reverence;
he will instil such reverence
in others who lack it;
and of those who possess it
he will speak in praise,
justly,
truly
and timely.

And, Sāriputta,
thus the full meaning of my brief words
ought to be understood.'

 


Epistle to the Colossians iv, 6: Let your speech be alway with grace, seasoned with salt, that ye may know how ye ought to answer every man.
K.J.V.

p.p. explains it all — p.p.

[1] Sovacassatā, from su-vacā; cf. the Epistle to the Colossians iv, 6


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