Anguttara Nikaya


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Aŋguttara Nikāya
Chakkanipata
IX. Sīti Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
The Book of the Sixes
Chapter IX: The Cool

Sutta 89

Appahāya Suttaɱ

To Be Given Up

Translated from the Pali by E.M. Hare.

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[1] Thus have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was dwelling near Sāvatthī,
at Jeta Grove,
in Anāthapiṇḍika's Park.

There the Exalted One addressed the monks, saying:

'Monks.'

'Yes, lord,' they replied,
and the Exalted One said:

'Monks, save one give up six things,
he becomes one
who cannot realize
the achievement of right view.[1]

What six?

The wrong view of life's bundle,
doubt,
belief in the adequacy of rule and rite,
passion that leads to the ill way,
hate leads to the ill way,
infatuation leads to the ill way.

[306] Verily, monks, save one give up these six,
he becomes one
who cannot realize
the achievement of right view.

 


 

But by giving up these six things,
he becomes one
who can realize
the achievement of right view.

What six?

The wrong view of life's bundle,
doubt,
belief in the adequacy of rule and rite,
passion that leads to the ill way,
hate leads to the ill way,
infatuation leads to the ill way.

Verily, monks, by giving up these six things,
he becomes one
who can realize
the achievement of right view.

 


Consult Points of Controversy if you must, but be warned that it is an exercise in four-dimensional insanity. The Theravadan position is argued ineptly with flawed understanding, the opposing position is sometimes correct and sometimes not, the commentary is, as translated, confused and contradictory, and the translator's bias and lack of knowledge based on experience renders the whole of it suspect.
The issue is: Does the one who has Diṭṭhisampadā-, (achieved view, or who 'knows and sees', that is, one who sees the truth of the Four Truths), that is the Streamwinner, have exactly seven more births, or can such a one have fewer than seven more births; and does such a one still experience thirst for the sensations that would result from deeds that would lead to rebirths lower than the human state. The first proposition is answered by the fact that even the Arahant is considered a Streamwinner, so the idea is 'seven rebirths at most' but fewer if there is exertion that results in deeper insights. The second proposition is answered by understanding the difference between experience of sensations, possibly even temptations, that arise from a passing thought, and the performance of an act. The Streamwinner in the earlier stages, may still experience thoughts that if acted on would lead to a bad rebirth, but because he has seen the truth of High View, that knowledge would rise up before him and he would see the danger and abstain from the act prior to actually taking any step that would lead to such bad rebirth.
The Pali in this sutta makes the distinction clear. The term is apāyagamaniyaɱ (rāgaɱ, dosaɱ, mohaɱ). 'suchas would lead to the apāya.' His lust, hate, or delusion does not rise to the level of taking action even to the degree of resolute 'wishing.' The nature of high view, when it is seen as it is, is of such an extent as to be said to be ever-present. In the idea 'This is Pain', the 'This' is everything whatsoever that can be said to exist and so comes up in relation to everything.

p.p. explains it all — p.p.

[1] Diṭṭhisampadā-, see Pts of Contr. 269


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