Anguttara Nikaya


[Site Map]  [Home]  [Sutta Indexes]  [Glossology]  [Site Sub-Sections]

The Pali is transliterated as IAST Unicode (āīūṃṅñṭḍṇḷ). Alternatives:
[ ASCII (aiumnntdnl) | Mobile (āīūŋńñţđņļ) | Velthuis (aaiiuu.m'n~n.t.d.n.l) ]

 

Anguttara Nikāya
Sattaka Nipāta
Mahā Vaggo

Sutta 64

Dhammaññū Suttaɱ

Dhamma-wise[1]

Translated from the Pali by E.M. Hare.

Copyright The Pali Text Society
Commercial Rights Reserved
Creative Commons Licence
For details see Terms of Use.

 


 

[1][ati] THUS have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was dwelling near Sāvatthī, at Jeta Grove,
in Anāthapiṇḍika's Park;
and there he addressed the monks, saying:

'Monks.'

'Yes, lord,' they replied;
and the Exalted One said:

'Monks, endowed with these seven qualities,
a monk is worthy of offerings,
worthy of oblations,
the world's peerless field for merit.[2]

With what seven?

Monks, herein a monk is a Dhamma-knower,
meaning-knower,
self-knower,
measure-knower,
time-knower,
assembly-knower,
noble or base person-knower.[3]

2. And how is a monk a Dhamma-knower?

Herein, monks, a monk knows Dhamma:
the sayings,
psalms,
catechisms,
songs,
solemnities,
speeches,
birth-stories,
marvels and runes.[4]

Unless he know
the sayings,
psalms,
catechisms,
songs,
solemnities,
speeches,
birth-stories,
marvels and runes
he should not be called a Dhamma-knower,
but because he knows
the sayings,
psalms,
catechisms,
songs,
solemnities,
speeches,
birth-stories,
marvels and runes,
therefore he is called a Dhamma-knower.

Such is the knower of Dhamma

 


 

3. And how is he a meaning-knower?

Herein, monks, a monk knows the meaning of this and that speech:

Such is the meaning of this speech,
such of that.

Unless he know:

Such is the meaning of this speech,
such of that,

he should not be called a knower of the meaning;
but because he knows:

Such is the meaning of this speech,
such of that -

therefore he is called a knower of the meaning.

Such is the knower of Dhamma
the knower of the meaning.

 


 

[76] 4. And how is he a self-knower?

Herein, monks, a monk knows of self:

Thus far am I in faith,
in virtue,
in learning,
in self-surrender,[5]
in wisdom
and in ready speech.[6]

Unless he know:

Thus far am I in faith,
in virtue,
in learning,
in self-surrender,
in wisdom
and in ready speech,

he should not be called a self-knower;
but because he knows of self:

Thus far am I in faith,
in virtue,
in learning,
in self-surrender,
in wisdom
and in ready speech,

therefore he is called a self-knower.

Such is a knower of Dhamma,
of the meaning
and of self.

 


 

5. And how is he a measure-knower?

Herein, monks, a monk knows measure in accepting the requisites,
that is to say:
the robe,
alms,
lodging
and medicaments.

Unless he know measure in accepting the requisites,
that is to say:
the robe,
alms,
lodging
and medicaments,
he should not be called a knower of measure;
but because he knows measure in accepting the requisites
that is to say:
the robe,
alms,
lodging
and medicaments,
therefore he is called a knower of measure.

Such is a knower of Dhamma,
of the meaning,
of self
and of measure.

 


 

6. And how is he a time-knower?

Herein, monks, a monk knows the time thus:

This is the time for recitation,
this for questioning,
this for effort,[7]
this for solitude.[8]

Unless he know the time for recitation,
for questioning,
for effort,
for solitude,
he should not be called a time-knower;
but because he knows the time for recitation,
for questioning
for effort,
for solitude,
therefore he is called a time-knower.

Such is a knower of Dhamma,
of the meaning,
of self,
of measure
and of time.

 


 

7. And how is he an assembly-knower?

Herein, monks, a monk knows assemblies thus:

This is an assembly of nobles,
this of brahmans,
this of householders,
this of recluses;[9]
there, one should approach in such a way,
stand thus,
sit,
speak
and be silent so.

Unless he knows
an assembly of nobles,
of brahmans,
of householders,
of recluses;
there, one should approach in such a way,
stand thus,
sit,
speak
and be silent so
he should not be called a knower of assemblies;
but because he knows an assembly of nobles,
an assembly of brahmans
[77] of householders,
of recluses;
there, one should approach in such a way,
stand thus,
sit,
speak
and be silent so
therefore he is called a knower of assemblies.

Such is a knower of Dhamma,
of the meaning,
of self,
of measure,
of proper times
and of assemblies.

 


 

8. And how is he a noble and base person-knower?[10]

Herein, monks, persons are known to a monk in two ways:

Of two persons, one desires to see the Ariyans,
the other does not.

This one, who has no desire to see the Ariyans,
is to be blamed for that reason;
but the other,
because he desires to see the Ariyans,
is to be commended.

Of two, who desire to see the Ariyans,
one desires to hear Saddhamma,
the other does not.

The latter is to be blamed for that reason,
the former is to be commended.

Of two, who desire to hear Saddhamma,
one listens to Dhamma with ready ear,
the other does not.

The latter is to be blamed,
the former is to be commended.

Of two, who listen to Dhamma with ready ear,
one, having heard it, is mindful of Dhamma,
the other is not.

The latter is to be blamed,
the former is to be commended.

Of two, who, having heard it,
are mindful of Dhamma,
one tests the truth of the doctrines he has learnt,
the other does not.

The latter is to be blamed,
the former is to be commended.

Of two, who test the truth of the doctrines learnt,
one knowing the letter and the spirit,
walks in conformity with Dhamma,
the other does not.

The latter is to be blamed,
the former is to be commended.[11]

Of two persons, who,
knowing the letter and the spirit,
walk in conformity with Dhamma,
one conforms for his own benefit,
but not for others;
the other conforms both for his own benefit
and for the benefit of others.

The person, who conforms for his own benefit
and not for others,
is to be blamed for that reason.

The person, who conforms both for his own benefit
and for the benefit of others,
is to be commended for that reason.

Thus, monks, persons are known to a monk in two ways;
and thus a monk is a knower of noble and base persons.[12]

[78] Verily, monks, endowed with these seven qualities, a monk is worthy of offerings,
worthy of oblations,
the world's peerless field for merit.'

 


[1] Dhamm'aññū.

[2] Above, p. 6.

[3] This list recurs at D. iii, 252, 283. At A. iii, 148 (G.S. iii, 114) five are of a rāja cakkavattin.

[4] This list recurs at M. i, 133; A. ii, 7, 103, 178; iii, 86, 177, 361; Vin. iii, 8. The terms are explained and examples are given of each by Buddhaghosa at D.A. i, 23 f. See Expositor 33.

[5] Cāga.

[6] So Mrs. Rhys Davids at Budd. Psychology, p. 28. This list, without 'ready speech,' recurs at A. i, 210; iii, 80; M. iii, 99; cf. D. iii, 164.

[7] Yogassa. Comy. yoge kammaɱ pakkhipanassa.

[8] Other four are given at A. ii, 140.

[9] This list recurs at D. iii, 236; A. ii, 133, extended to devas; cf. below, p. 205.

[10] Puggalaparoparaññū, paropara or parovara means high and low. Comy. Tikhha-mudu-bhāvaɱ acute and 'soft' state. Sn.A. 350, the good and the not good. Ibid. 607, Hīnappaṇītaɱ, the low and the lofty.

[11] These terms of right 'endowment' constantly recur - e.g., below p. 261; A. i, 35; iii, 176; M. ii, 173.

[12] Cf. below, p. 149; A. ii, 97.


Contact:
E-mail
Copyright Statement   Webmaster's Page