Anguttara Nikaya


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Anguttara Nikāya
Sattaka Nipāta
Mahā Vaggo

Sutta 69

Sunetta Suttaɱ

U-N-A-B-B-R-E-V-I-A-T-E-D

Bright-Eyes

Translated from the Pali by E.M. Hare.

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[1] THUS have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was dwelling near Sāvatthī, at Jeta Grove,
in Anāthapiṇḍika's Park;
and there he addressed the monks, saying:

'Monks.'

'Yes, lord,' they replied;
and the Exalted One said:

'In bygone days, monks, there arose a teacher named Bright-Eyes,[1]
a course-setter,
freed of all lustful passions.

Now he had many hundreds of disciples
to whom he taught the doctrine of fellowship in Brahmā's world.

And those who inclined not their hearts towards the teacher's doctrine,
on the breaking up of the body after death,
arose in the untoward way,
the ill way,
the abyss,
hell;
but those who inclined their hearts to his doctrine,
on the breaking up of the body after death,
arose in heaven,
that happy place of faring on.

In bygone days, monks, there was a teacher named Maimed-Mute a course-setter,
freed of all lustful passions.

Now he had many hundreds of disciples
to whom he taught the doctrine of fellowship in Brahmā's world.

And those who inclined not their hearts towards the teacher's doctrine,
on the breaking up of the body after death,
arose in the untoward way,
the ill way,
the abyss,
hell;
but those who inclined their hearts to his doctrine,
on the breaking up of the body after death,
arose in heaven,
that happy place of faring on.

In bygone days, monks, there was a teacher named Spoke-Rim a course-setter,
freed of all lustful passions.

Now he had many hundreds of disciples
to whom he taught the doctrine of fellowship in Brahmā's world.

And those who inclined not their hearts towards the teacher's doctrine,
on the breaking up of the body after death,
arose in the untoward way,
the ill way,
the abyss,
hell;
but those who inclined their hearts to his doctrine,
on the breaking up of the body after death,
arose in heaven,
that happy place of faring on.

In bygone days, monks, there was a teacher named Tiller a course-setter,
freed of all lustful passions.

Now he had many hundreds of disciples
to whom he taught the doctrine of fellowship in Brahmā's world.

And those who inclined not their hearts towards the teacher's doctrine,
on the breaking up of the body after death,
arose in the untoward way,
the ill way,
the abyss,
hell;
but those who inclined their hearts to his doctrine,
on the breaking up of the body after death,
arose in heaven,
that happy place of faring on.

In bygone days, monks, there was a teacher named Mahout a course-setter,
freed of all lustful passions.

Now he had many hundreds of disciples
to whom he taught the doctrine of fellowship in Brahmā's world.

And those who inclined not their hearts towards the teacher's doctrine,
on the breaking up of the body after death,
arose in the untoward way,
the ill way,
the abyss,
hell;
but those who inclined their hearts to his doctrine,
on the breaking up of the body after death,
arose in heaven,
that happy place of faring on.

In bygone days, monks, there was a teacher named Light-Ward a course-setter,
freed of all lustful passions.

Now he had many hundreds of disciples
to whom he taught the doctrine of fellowship in Brahmā's world.

And those who inclined not their hearts towards the teacher's doctrine,
on the breaking up of the body after death,
arose in the untoward way,
the ill way,
the abyss,
hell;
but those who inclined their hearts to his doctrine,
on the breaking up of the body after death,
arose in heaven,
that happy place of faring on.

In bygone days, monks, there was a teacher named Wheel-Wright a course-setter,
freed of all lustful passions.

Now he had many hundreds of disciples
to whom he taught the doctrine of fellowship in Brahmā's world.

And those who inclined not their hearts towards the teacher's doctrine,
on the breaking up of the body after death,
arose in the untoward way,
the ill way,
the abyss,
hell;
but those who inclined their hearts to his doctrine,
on the breaking up of the body after death,
arose in heaven,
that happy place of faring on.[2]

Now what think ye, monks, were an evil-minded man to revile and defame these seven teachers of old,
course-setters,
freed from all lustful passions,
surrounded by many hundreds of disciples,
would he beget much demerit?

'Yea, lord.'

'Indeed, monks,[3] were an evil-minded man to revile and defame these seven teachers of old,
course-setters,
freed from all lustful passions,
surrounded by many hundreds of disciples,
he would beget much demerit,
but the evil-minded man,
who reviles and defames a person of vision,[4]
he for that begets much more demerit.

And why is that?

I declare, monks, he digs not so great a pit[5] for himself in reviling outsiders
as in reviling his fellows in the godly life.

Wherefore, monks, train ye thus:

Not unto us shall there come||
evil thoughts about our fellows in the godly life.

Thus must ye train yourselves, monks!'

 


[1] Cf. above, p. 68. These seven teachers of old are no doubt previous rebirths of the Bodhisatva. Here Bu. makes no comment. See G.S. iii, 264. Titthakaro, usually rendered 'ford-maker.'

[2] Cf. J. i, 46, ii, 60; Vism. 237.

[3] The text repeats in full. [Ed.: Recreated for this edition.]

[4] Diṭṭhisampannaɱ. Here the Comy. is silent, but ad A. iii, 372, 'dassanasampannaɱ, sotāpannaṇ' (cf. diṭṭhajpada above, p. 67 n.); see Dial. iii, 206 n.

[5] See G.S. iii, 264 n. here as well khantiɱ, without comment; S.e. so.


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