Anguttara Nikaya


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Anguttara Nikāya
Sattaka Nipāta

The Book of the
Gradual Sayings
The Book of the Sevens

The Recital
III

The Understanding of Passions, Etc.[ed1]

Translated from the Pali by E.M. Hare.

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Chapter IX:03.Suttas 611-1120

Sutta 611
The Understanding of Passion

[611.1] THUS have I heard:

'Monks, for the complete understanding of passion, seven qualities must be made-to-become.

What seven?

The part in awakening that is mindfulness;
the part in awakening that is investigation of Dhamma;
the part in awakening that is energy;
the part in awakening that is zest;
the part in awakening that is tranquillity;
the part in awakening that is concentration;
and the part in awakening that is poise.[1]

Monks, for the complete understanding of passion,
these seven qualities must be cultivated.'

Sutta 612
The Understanding of Passion

[612.1] THUS have I heard:

'Monks, for the complete understanding of passion, seven qualities must be made-to-become.

The thought of impermanence,
of no self,
of foulness,
of danger,
of abandoning,
of dispassion,
and of ending.

Monks, for the complete understanding of passion,
these seven qualities must be cultivated.'

Sutta 613
The Understanding of Passion

[613.1] THUS have I heard:

'Monks, for the complete understanding of passion, seven qualities must be made-to-become.

The thought of foulness,
of death,
of revulsion from food,
of disaffection for all worldly things,
of impermanence,
of ill in impermanence,
and of no self in ill.[2]

Monks, for the complete understanding of passion,
these seven qualities must be cultivated.'

Suttas 615-640
Of Passion

[614-640.1] THUS have I heard:

'Monks, for the
comprehension ...
the exhaustion ...
the abandonment ...
the destruction ...
the decay of ...
the freedom from desire for ...
the cessation of ...
the quittance ...
the renunciation of passion,
these three sets of seven qualities must be cultivated:

The part in awakening that is mindfulness;
the part in awakening that is investigation of Dhamma;
the part in awakening that is energy;
the part in awakening that is zest;
the part in awakening that is tranquillity;
the part in awakening that is concentration;
and the part in awakening that is poise.

The thought of impermanence,
of no self,
of foulness,
of danger,
of abandoning,
of dispassion,
and of ending.

The thought of foulness,
of death,
of revulsion from food,
of disaffection for all worldly things,
of impermanence,
of ill in impermanence,
and of no self in ill.

'Monks, for the
comprehension ...
the exhaustion ...
the abandonment ...
the destruction ...
the decay of ...
the freedom from desire for ...
the cessation of ...
the quittance ...
the renunciation of passion,
these three sets of seven qualities must be cultivated:

Suttas 641-1120
Of Other Conditions

[641-1120.1] THUS have I heard:

'Monks, for the
understanding ...
comprehension ...
the exhaustion ...
the abandonment ...
the destruction ...
the decay of ...
the freedom from desire for ...
the cessation of ...
the quittance ...
the renunciation

of hatred ...
of illusion ...
of anger ...
of enmity ...
of hypocrisy ...
of malice ...
of envy ...
of avarice ...
of deceit ...
of craftiness ...
of obstinacy ...
of impetuosity ...
of pride ...
of arrogance ...
of intoxication ...
of indolence

these three sets of seven qualities must be cultivated:

The part in awakening that is mindfulness;
the part in awakening that is investigation of Dhamma;
the part in awakening that is energy;
the part in awakening that is zest;
the part in awakening that is tranquillity;
the part in awakening that is concentration;
and the part in awakening that is poise.

The thought of impermanence,
of no self,
of foulness,
of danger,
of abandoning,
of dispassion,
and of ending.

The thought of foulness,
of death,
of revulsion from food,
of disaffection for all worldly things,
of impermanence,
of ill in impermanence,
and of no self in ill.

'Monks, for the
understanding ...
comprehension ...
the exhaustion ...
the abandonment ...
the destruction ...
the decay of ...
the freedom from desire for ...
the cessation of ...
the quittance ...
the renunciation

of hatred ...
of illusion ...
of anger ...
of enmity ...
of hypocrisy ...
of malice ...
of envy ...
of avarice ...
of deceit ...
of craftiness ...
of obstinacy ...
of impetuosity ...
of pride ...
of arrogance ...
of intoxication ...
of indolence

these three sets of seven qualities must be cultivated.

Thus spake the Exalted One and, glad at heart, those monks rejoiced in the word of the Blessed One.'

THE SECTION OF SEVENS IS ENDED

 


[1] See K.S. v, 51 ff. The text does not give the seven limbs in full. Above, Ī 24.

[2] Above, p. 27; Dial. iii, 263; A. iii, 79; v, 309. See G.S. iii, 201 n.

 


[ed1] This Chapter has been mostly left in it's original abbreviated form. It has been altered only to make it more easily read.


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