Anguttara Nikaya


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Anguttara Nikāya
Navaka Nipāta

The Book of the
Gradual Sayings
The Book of the Nines
Chapter VII: The Arisings of Mindfulness

Sutta 64

Sikkhādubbalya Satipaṭṭhāna Suttaɱ

Hindrances

Translated from the Pali by E.M. Hare.

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[1][ati] Thus have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was dwelling near Savatthī, at Jeta Grove, in Anāthapiṇḍika's Park.

There he addressed the monks, saying: 'Monks.'

'Yes, lord,' they replied; and the Exalted One said:

'Monks, there are these five hindrances.[1]

What five?

The hindrance of sensuality;
the hindrance of ill-will;
the hindrance of sloth and torpor;
the hindrance of flurry and worry;
and the hindrance of doubt.

Monks, these are the five hindrances.

Monks, when these five hindrances are put away, four arisings of mindfulness should be made to become.

What four?

Monks, herein a monk abides contemplating the body as body,
strenuous,
mindful
and self-possessed,
having overcome both the hankering and discontent
common in the world.

He abides contemplating the feelings as feelings
strenuous,
mindful
and self-possessed,
having overcome both the hankering and discontent
common in the world.

He abides contemplating the mind as mind
strenuous,
mindful
and self-possessed,
having overcome both the hankering and discontent
common in the world.

He abides contemplating ideas as ideas
strenuous,
mindful
and self-possessed,
having overcome both the hankering and discontent
common in the world.

Monks, when these five sources of weakness to training are put away,
these four arisings of mindfulness should be made to become.

 


[1] D. i, 246; M. i, 60; S. v, 60; A. v, 16 and passim.


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