Anguttara Nikaya


[Site Map]  [Home]  [Sutta Indexes]  [Glossology]  [Site Sub-Sections]

The Pali is transliterated as IAST Unicode (āīūṃṅñṭḍṇḷ). Alternatives:
[ ASCII (aiumnntdnl) | Velthuis (aaiiuu.m'n~n.t.d.n.l) ]

 

Aŋguttara Nikāya
X. Dasaka-Nipāta
II. Nātha Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
X. The Book of the Tens
II: Things Making for Warding

Sutta 18

Dutiya Nāthakaraṇa Suttaɱ

Warder (b)

Translated from the Pali by F. L. Woodward, M.A.

Copyright The Pali Text Society
Commercial Rights Reserved
Creative Commons Licence
For details see Terms of Use.

 


[25] [20]

[1][bodh] Thus have I heard:[ed1]

On a certain occasion the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī.

There the Exalted One addressed the monks, saying:

'Monks.'

'Yes, lord,' they replied, and the Exalted One said:

2. 'Monks, do ye live warded, not warderless.

Sorrowfully dwells the warderless monk.

Monks, there are these ten states that make for warding.

What ten?

3. Herein a monk is virtuous,
restrained with the restraint of the Obligation,
well equipped in range of practice,
seeing danger in minutest faults,
and undertaking the precepts trains himself therein.

Saying,

"This monk is indeed virtuous,
restrained with the restraint of the Obligation,
well equipped in range of practice,
seeing danger in minutest faults,
and undertaking the precepts trains himself therein,"

The senior monks consider him to be one fit for encouragement;
so likewise do the monks of middle standing
and the novices.

For him thus regarded with kindly feeling
by senior monks,
by those of middle standing
and by novices alike,
growth, not decline,
in good states is to be looked for.

This then is a state that makes for warding.

4. Then again a monk has heard much;
he bears in mind what he has heard,
he stores up what he has heard.

Whatsoever teachings,
lovely at the beginning,
lovely midway,
lovely at the end (of life),
in spirit and in letter
do stress the brahma-life
in its all-round fulness
and utter purity,
such teachings are much heard by him,
borne in mind,
repeated aloud,
pondered
and well penetrated by vision.

Saying,

"This monk has indeed heard much;
he bears in mind what he has heard,
he stores up what he has heard.

Whatsoever teachings,
lovely at the beginning,
lovely midway,
lovely at the end (of life),
in spirit and in letter
do stress the brahma-life
in its all-round fulness
and utter purity,
such teachings are much heard by him,
borne in mind,
repeated aloud,
pondered
and well penetrated by vision,"

The senior monks consider him to be one fit for encouragement;
so likewise do the monks of middle standing
and the novices.

For him thus regarded with kindly feeling
by senior monks,
by those of middle standing
and by novices alike,
growth, not decline,
in good states is to be looked for.

This too is a state that makes for warding.

5. Then again a monk has friendship with the lovely,
fellowship with the lovely,
companionship with the lovely.

Saying,

"This monk indeed has friendship with the lovely,
fellowship with the lovely,
companionship with the lovely,

The senior monks consider him to be one fit for encouragement;
so likewise do the monks of middle standing
and the novices.

For him thus regarded with kindly feeling
by senior monks,
by those of middle standing
and by novices alike,
growth, not decline,
in good states is to be looked for.

This too is a state that makes for warding.

6. Then again a monk is pleasant to speak to,
he is blest with qualities
that make him easy to speak to,
he is patient and clever
at grasping instruction given.

Saying,

"This monk indeed is pleasant to speak to,
he is blest with qualities
that make him easy to speak to,
he is patient and clever
at grasping instruction given,"

The senior monks consider him to be one fit for encouragement;
so likewise do the monks of middle standing
and the novices.

For him thus regarded with kindly feeling
by senior monks,
by those of middle standing
and by novices alike,
growth, not decline,
in good states is to be looked for.

This too is a state that makes for warding.

7. Then again a monk in all the undertakings of his co-mates in the brahma-life,
be they matters weighty or trivial,
is shrewd and energetic,
possessing ability to give proper consideration thereto,
as to what is the right thing to do
and how to manage it.

Saying,

"This monk indeed in all the undertakings of his co-mates in the brahma-life,
be they matters weighty or trivial,
is shrewd and energetic,
possessing ability to give proper consideration thereto,
as to what is the right thing to do
and how to manage it,"

The senior monks consider him to be one fit for encouragement;
so likewise do the monks of middle standing
and the novices.

For him thus regarded with kindly feeling
by senior monks,
by those of middle standing
and by novices alike,
growth, not decline,
in good states is to be looked for.

This too is a state that makes for warding.

8. Then again a monk delights in dhamma,
is pleasant to converse with,
rejoices exceedingly in further dhamma
and further discipline.

Saying,

"This monk indeed delights in dhamma,
is pleasant to converse with,
rejoices exceedingly in further dhamma
and further discipline,"

The senior monks consider him to be one fit for encouragement;
so likewise do the monks of middle standing
and the novices.

For him thus regarded with kindly feeling
by senior monks,
by those of middle standing
and by novices alike,
growth, not decline,
in good states is to be looked for.

This too is a state that makes for warding.

9. Then again a monk dwells resolute in energy
for the abandonment of bad qualities,
stout and strong
to acquire good qualities,
not shirking the burden in good qualities.

Saying,

"This monk indeed dwells resolute in energy
for the abandonment of bad qualities,
stout and strong
to acquire good qualities,
not shirking the burden in good qualities,"

The senior monks consider him to be one fit for encouragement;
so likewise do the monks of middle standing
and the novices.

For him thus regarded with kindly feeling
by senior monks,
by those of middle standing
and by novices alike,
growth, not decline,
in good states is to be looked for.

This too is a state that makes for warding.

10. Then again a monk is content
with whatsoever supply of robes,
alms-food,
lodging,
comforts
and medicaments for sickness he may get.

Saying,

"This monk is indeed content
with whatsoever supply of robes,
alms-food,
lodging,
comforts
and medicaments for sickness he may get,"

The senior monks consider him to be one fit for encouragement;
so likewise do the monks of middle standing
and the novices.

For him thus regarded with kindly feeling
by senior monks,
by those of middle standing
and by novices alike,
growth, not decline,
in good states is to be looked for.

This too is a state that makes for warding.

11. Then again a monk is concentrated,
possessed of mindful discrimination
in the highest degree,
able to call to mind and remember
things done and said long ago.

Saying,

"This monk indeed is concentrated,
possessed of mindful discrimination
in the highest degree,
able to call to mind and remember
things done and said long ago,"

The senior monks consider him to be one fit for encouragement;
so likewise do the monks of middle standing
and the novices.

For him thus regarded with kindly feeling
by senior monks,
by those of middle standing
and by novices alike,
growth, not decline,
in good states is to be looked for.

This too is a state that makes for warding.

12. Then again a monk is possessed of insight;
he has insight for tracing out the rise and fall of things,
insight which is Ariyan,
penetrating,
going on to the utter destruction of ill.

Saying,

"This monk indeed is possessed of insight;
he has insight for tracing out the rise and fall of things,
insight which is Ariyan,
penetrating,
going on to the utter destruction of ill,"

The senior monks consider him to be one fit for encouragement;
so likewise do the monks of middle standing
and the novices.

For him thus regarded with kindly feeling
by senior monks,
by those of middle standing
and by novices alike,
growth, not decline,
in good states is to be looked for.

This too is a state that makes for warding.

Monks, do ye live warded, not warderless.

Sorrowful dwells the warderless, monks.

These then are the ten states that make for warding.'

 


[ed1] For informative footnotes on the concepts discussed in this sutta see the preceding almost identical sutta: AN 10.17


Contact:
E-mail
Copyright Statement