Khuddaka Nikaya


[Site Map]  [Home]  [Sutta Indexes]  [Glossology]  [Site Sub-Sections]

The Pali is transliterated as IAST Unicode (āīūṃṅñṭḍṇḷ). Alternatives:
[ ASCII (aiumnntdnl) | Mobile (āīūŋńñţđņļ) | Velthuis (aaiiuu.m'n~n.t.d.n.l) ]

 


 


PSALMS OF THE BRETHREN

Canto II. Psalms of Two Verses


 

Canto II.
Psalms of Two Verses

CLXIII
Brahmāli

Translated from the Pali by Mrs. C.A.F. Rhys Davids.

Public Domain

[idx][Pali]

 

Reborn in this Buddha-age in the kingdom of Kosala, as a brahmin's son, he was named Brahmāli. When grown up, being impelled by the fulness of conditions, distress arose in him because of the continual round, and, through associating with spiritually minded friends, he left the world, and took his exercise to a forest. From the maturity of his knowledge he soon developed insight, and acquired sixfold abhiññā.

Dwelling thereafter in the bliss of the Paths, the Thera, so versed in compassing endeavour, uttered one day these verses, on behalf of the bhikkhus in that forest, concerning devotion to endeavour:

[205] In whom the senses have been hushed to calm,
Like horses well tamed by the charioteer,
In whom no vain conceits are found, nor aught
Of poison-fumes survives, a man like this
May stir up envy e'en among the gods.

[206] [151] In me the senses have been hushed to calm,
Like horses well tamed by the charioteer,
In me no vain conceits are found, nor aught
Of poison-fumes survives; - one such as I
May stir up envy e'en among the gods.[1]

 


[1] The first gāthā is found in the Dhammapada, verse 94, spoken, according to the Commentary (ii 176 f.), by the Buddha concerning Mahā Kaccā[ya]na. Cf. below. CCXXIX.

 


Contact:
E-mail
Copyright Statement   Webmaster's Page