Majjhima Nikaya


[Site Map]  [Home]  [Sutta Indexes]  [Glossology]  [Site Sub-Sections]

The Pali is transliterated as IAST Unicode (āīūṃṅñṭḍṇḷ). Alternatives:
[ ASCII (aiumnntdnl) | Mobile (āīūŋńñţđņļ) | Velthuis (aaiiuu.m'n~n.t.d.n.l) ]

 

Majjhima Nikāya
I. Mūlapaṇṇāsa
2. Sīhanāda Vagga

The Middle Length Sayings
I. The First Fifty Discourses
2. The Division of the Lion's Roar

Sutta 15

Anumāna Suttaɱ[1]

Discourse on Measureing in Accordance With

Translated from the Pali by I.B. Horner, M.A.
Associate of Newham College, Cambridge
First Published in 1954

Copyright The Pali Text Society
Commercial Rights Reserved
Creative Commons Licence
For details see Terms of Use.

 


 

[1][chlm][upal] THUS have I heard:

At one time the venerable Moggallāna the Great was staying among the Bhaggas in Sumsumāragira[2] in Bhesakaḷā Grove in the deer-park.

Then the venerable Moggallāna the Great addressed the monks, saying:

"Reverend monks".

"Your [125] reverence,"
these monks answered the venerable Moggallāna the Great in assent.

Then the venerable Moggallāna the Great spoke thus:

"Now, if, your reverences, a monk invites, saying:

'Let the venerable ones speak[3] to me,
I should be spoken to by the venerable ones,'

but if he is one whom it is difficult to speak to,[4]
endowed with quahties which make him difficult to speak to,
intractable,
incapable of being instructed,[5]
then his fellow Brahmafarers judge that he should not be spoken to
and that he should not be instructed[6]
and that trust should not be placed in that individual.

Now what, your reverences,
are the quahties which make him difficult to speak to?

Herein, your reverences,
a monk comes to be of evil desires
and in the thrall of evil desires.

Whatever monk, your reverences,
comes to be of evil desires
and in the thrall of evil desires,
this is a quality that makes him difficult to speak to.

And again, your reverences,
a monk exalts himself
and disparages others.[7]

Whatever monk exalts himself
and disparages others,
this too is a quality that makes him difficult to speak to.

And again, your reverences,
a monk comes to be wrathful,
overpowered by wrath.

Whatever monk is wrathful,
overpowered by wrath,
this too is a quality that makes him difficult to speak to.

And again, your reverences,
a monk comes to be wrathful
and because of his wrath
is a fault-finder.[8]

Whatever monk is wrathful
and because of his wrath is a fault-finder,
this too is a quality that makes him difficult to speak to.

And again, your reverences,
a monk comes to be wrathful
and because of his wrath
is one who takes offence.

Whatever monk is wrathful
and because of his wrath
is one who takes offence,
this too is a quality that makes him difficult to speak to.

And again, your reverences,
a monk comes to be wrathful
and because of his wrath
utters words bordering on wrath.

Whatever monk is wrathful
and because of his wrath
utters [126] words bordering on wrath,
this too is a quality that makes him difficult to speak to.

And again, your reverences,
a monk, reproved,[9]
blurts out reproof against the reprover.

Whatever monk, reproved,
blurts out reproof against the reprover,
this too is a quality that makes him difficult to speak to.

And again, your reverences,
a monk, reproved,
disparages the reprover for the reproof.

Whatever monk, reproved,
disparages the reprover for the reproof,
this too is a quality that makes him difficult to speak to.

And again, your reverences,
a monk, reproved,
rounds on[10] the reprover for the reproof.

Whatever monk, reproved,
rounds on the reprover for the reproof,
this too is a quality that makes him difficult to speak to.

And again, your reverences,
a monk, reproved,
shelves the question by (asking) the reprover another,[11]
answers off the point,[12]
and evinces temper
and ill-will
and sulkiness.

Whatever monk, reproved,
shelves the question by asking the reprover another,
answers off the point,
and evinces temper
and ill-will
and sulkiness,
this too is a quality that makes him difficult to speak to.

And again, your reverences,
a monk, reproved,
does not succeed in explaining his movements[13] to the reprover.

Whatever monk, reproved,
does not succeed in explaining his movements to the reprover,
this too is a quality that makes him difficult to speak to.

And again, your reverences,
a monk comes to be harsh,
spiteful.[14]

Whatever monk comes to be harsh,
spiteful,
this too is a quality that makes him difficult to speak to.

And again, your reverences,
a monk comes to be envious,
grudging.

Whatever monk comes to be envious,
grudging,
this too is a quality that makes him difficult to speak to.

And again, your reverences,
a monk comes to be treacherous,
deceitful.

Whatever monk comes to be treacherous,
deceitful,
this too is a quality that makes him difficult to speak to.

And again, you reverences,
a monk comes to be stubborn,
proud.

Whatever monk comes to be stubborn,
proud,
this too is a quality that makes him difficult to speak to.

And again, your reverences,
a monk comes to seize the temporal,
grasping it tightly,
not letting go of it easily.

Whatever monk comes to seize the temporal, [127]
grasping it tightly,
not letting go of it easily,[15]
this too is a quality that makes him difficult to speak to.

These, your reverences, are called
the qualities which make it difficult to speak to (a monk).

 


 

But if, your reverences, a monk invites, saying:

'Let the venerable ones speak to me,
I should be spoken to by the venerable ones'

and if he is one whom it is easy to speak to,
endowed with qualities which make him easy to speak to,
tractable,
capable of being instructed,
then his fellow Brahma-farers judge
that he should be spoken to
and that he should be instructed
and that trust should be placed in that individual.

And what, your reverences,
are the quahties which make him easy to speak to?

Herein, your reverences,
a monk does not come to be of evil desires
nor in the thrall of evil desires.

Whatever monk comes to be not of evil desires
nor in the thrall of evil desires,
this is a quality that makes him easy to speak to.

And again, your reverences,
a monk does not come to exalt himself
nor to disparage others.

Whatever monk,
does not come to exalt himself
nor to disparage others
this is a quality that makes him easy to speak to.

And again, your reverences,
a monk does not come to be wrathful,
overpowered by wrath.

Whatever monk,
does not come to be wrathful,
overpowered by wrath,
this is a quality that makes him easy to speak to.

And again, your reverences,
a monk does not come to be wrathful
and a fault-finder because of his wrath.

Whatever monk,
does not come to be wrathful
and a fault-finder because of his wrath,
this is a quality that makes him easy to speak to.

And again, your reverences,
a monk does not come to be wrathful
and because of his wrath takes offence.

Whatever monk,
does not come to be wrathful
and because of his wrath take offence,
this is a quality that makes him easy to speak to.

And again, your reverences,
a monk does not come to be wrathful
and because of his wrath utters words bordering on wrath.

Whatever monk does not come to be wrathful
and because of his wrath utter words bordering on wrath,
this is a quality that makes him easy to speak to.

And again, your reverences,
a monk, reproved,
does not blurt out reproof against the reprover.

Whatever monk, reproved,
does not blurt out reproof against the reprover,
this is a quality that makes him easy to speak to.

And again, your reverences,
a monk, reproved,
does not disparage the reprover for the reproof.

Whatever monk, reproved,
does not disparage the reprover for the reproof,
this is a quality that makes him easy to speak to.

And again, your reverences,
a monk, reproved,
does not round on the reprover for the reproof.

Whatever monk, reproved,
does not round on the reprover for the reproof,
this is a quality that makes him easy to speak to.

And again, your reverences,
a monk, reproved,
does not shelve the question by asking the reprover another,
he does not answer off the point,
he does not evince temper
and ill-will
and sulkiness.

Whatever monk, reproved,
does not shelve the question by asking the reprover another,
does not answer off the point,
does not evince temper,
ill-will
and sulkiness,
this is a quality that makes him easy to speak to.

And again, your reverences,
a monk, reproved,
succeeds in [128] explaining his movements to the reprover.

Whatever monk, reproved,
succeeds in explaining his movements to the reprover,
this is a quality that makes him easy to speak to.

And again, your reverences,
a monk comes to be not harsh,
not spiteful.

Whatever monk comes to be not harsh,
not spiteful,
this is a quality that makes him easy to speak to.

And again, your reverences,
a monk comes to be not envious,
not grudging.

Whatever monk comes to be not envious,
not grudging,
this is a quality that makes him easy to speak to.

And again, your reverences,
a monk comes to be not treacherous,
not deceitful.

Whatever monk comes to be not treacherous,
not deceitful,
this is a quality that makes him easy to speak to.

And again, your reverences,
a monk comes to be not stubborn,
not proud.

Whatever monk to be not stubborn,
not proud,
this is a quality that makes him easy to speak to.

And again, your reverences,
a monk comes not to seize the temporal,
not grasping it tightly,
letting go of it easily.

Whatever monk comes not to seize the temporal,
not grasping it tightly,
letting go of it easily,
this too is a quality that makes him easy to speak to.

These, your reverences, are called
the qualities that make it easy to speak to (a monk).

 


 

There in,[16] your reverences,
self ought to be measured against self[17] thus by a monk:

'That person who is of evil desires
and who is in the thrall of evil desires,
that person is displeasing and disagreeable to me;
and, similarly,
if I were of evil desires
and in the thrall of evil desires,
I would be displeasing and disagreeable to others.'

When a monk, your reverences,
knows this,
he should make up his mind that:

'I will not be of evil desires
nor in the thrall of evil desires.'

'That person who exalts himself||
and disparages others,
that person is displeasing and disagreeable to me;
and, similarly,
if I were to exalt myself
and disparage others,
I would be displeasing and disagreeable to others.'

When a monk, your reverences,
knows this,
he should make up his mind that:

'I will not exalt myself
and disparage others.'

'That person who is wrathful,
overcome by wrath,
that person is displeasing and disagreeable to me;
and, similarly,
if I were wrathful,
overcome by wrath,
I would be displeasing and disagreeable to others.'

When a monk, your reverences,
knows this,
he should make up his mind that:

'I will not be wrathful,
overcome by wrath.'

'Whatever person is wrathful
and because of his wrath is a fault-finder,
that person is displeasing and disagreeable to me;
and, similarly,
if I were wrathful,
and were a fault-finder because of wrath,
I would be displeasing and disagreeable to others.'

When a monk, your reverences,
knows this,
he should make up his mind that:

'I will not be one who is wrathful
nor one who is a fault-finder because of wrath.'

'Whatever person is wrathful
and because of his wrath is one who takes offence,
that person is displeasing and disagreeable to me;
and, similarly,
if I were wrathful,
and were one who takes offence because of wrath,
I would be displeasing and disagreeable to others.'

When a monk, your reverences,
knows this,
he should make up his mind that:

'I will not be one who is wrathful
nor one who takes offence because of wrath.'

'Whatever person is wrathful
and because of his wrath utters words bordering on wrath,
that person is displeasing and disagreeable to me;
and, similarly,
if I were wrathful,
and were one who utters words bordering on wrath because of wrath,
I would be displeasing and disagreeable to others.'

When a monk, your reverences,
knows this,
he should make up his mind that:

'I will not be one who is wrathful
nor one who utters words bordering on wrath because of wrath.'

'Whatever person, reproved,
blurts out reproof against the reprover,
that person is displeasing and disagreeable to me;
and, similarly,
if I were reproved,
and were to blurt out reproof against the reprover,
I would be displeasing and disagreeable to others.'

When a monk, your reverences,
knows this,
he should make up his mind that:

'I, reproved,
will not blurt out reproof against the reprover.'

'Whatever person, reproved,
disparages the reprover for the reproof,
that person is displeasing and disagreeable to me;
and, similarly,
if I were reproved,
and were to disparage the reprover for the reproof,
I would be displeasing and disagreeable to others.'

When a monk, your reverences,
knows this,
he should make up his mind that:

'I, reproved,
will not disparage the reprover for the reproof.'

'Whatever person, reproved,
rounds on the reprover for the reproof,
that person is displeasing and disagreeable to me;
and, similarly,
if I were reproved,
and were to round on the reprover for the reproof,
I would be displeasing and disagreeable to others.'

When a monk, your reverences,
knows this,
he should make up his mind that:

'I, reproved,
will not round on the reprover for the reproof.'

'Whatever person, reproved,
shelves the question by asking the reprover another,
answers off the point,
and evinces temper,
ill-will
and sulkiness
that person is displeasing and disagreeable to me;
and, similarly,
if I were reproved,
and were to shelve the question by asking the reprover another,
answer off the point,
and evince temper,
ill-will
and sulkiness
I would be displeasing and disagreeable to others.'

When a monk, your reverences,
knows this,
he should make up his mind that:

'I, reproved,
will not shelve the question by asking the reprover another
answer off the point,
and evince temper,
ill-will
and sulkiness.'

'Whatever person, reproved,
does not succeed in explaining his movements to the reprover,
that person is displeasing and disagreeable to me;
and, similarly,
if I were reproved,
and did not succeed in explaining my movements to the reprover
I would be displeasing and disagreeable to others.'

When a monk, your reverences,
knows this,
he should make up his mind that:

'I, reproved,
will explain my movements to the reprover.'

'Whatever person is harsh,
spiteful,
that person is displeasing and disagreeable to me;
and, similarly,
if I were harsh,
spiteful,
I would be displeasing and disagreeable to others.'

When a monk, your reverences,
knows this,
he should make up his mind that:

'I, will be not harsh,
spiteful.'

'Whatever person is envious,
grudging,
that person is displeasing and disagreeable to me;
and, similarly,
if I were envious,
grudging,
I would be displeasing and disagreeable to others.'

When a monk, your reverences,
knows this,
he should make up his mind that:

'I, will not be envious,
grudging.'

'Whatever person is treacherous,
deceitful,
that person is displeasing and disagreeable to me;
and, similarly,
if I were treacherous,
deceitful,
I would be displeasing and disagreeable to others.'

When a monk, your reverences,
knows this,
he should make up his mind that:

'I, will not be treacherous,
deceitful.'

'Whatever person is stubborn,
proud,
that person is displeasing and disagreeable to me;
and, similarly,
if I were stubborn,
proud,
I would be displeasing and disagreeable to others.'

When a monk, your reverences,
knows this,
he should make up his mind that:

'I, will not be stubborn,
proud.'

'Whatever person comes to seize the temporal,
grasping it tightly,
not letting go of it easily,
that person is displeasing and disagreeable to me;
and, similarly,
if I were to seize the temporal,
grasping it tightly,
not letting go of it easily,
I would be displeasing and disagreeable to others.'

When a monk, your reverences,
knows this,
he should make up his mind that:

'I, will not seize the temporal,
grasping it tightly,
not letting go of it easily'

 


 

Therein, your reverences,
self ought to be reflected upon by self thus by a monk:

'Now, am I of evil desires,
in the thrall of evil desires?'

If, your reverences,
while the monk is reflecting,
he knows thus:

'I am of evil desires,
in the thrall of evil desires,'
then, your reverences,
that monk should strive
to get rid of those evil unskilled states.

But if, your reverences, that monk,
while reflecting,
knows thus:

'I am not of evil desires,
not in the thrall of evil desires,'
then, with rapture and delight,
they should be forsaken by that monk,
training day and night in skilled states.

And again, your reverences,
self ought to be reflected upon by self thus by a monk:

'Now, am I one who exalts himself,
disparages others?'

If, your reverences,
while the monk is reflecting,
he knows thus:

'I am one who exalts himself,
disparages others,'
then, your reverences,
that monk should strive
to get rid of those evil unskilled states.

But if, your reverences, that monk,
while reflecting,
knows thus:

'I am not one who exalts himself,
disparages others,'
then, with rapture and delight,
they should be forsaken by that monk,
training day and night in skilled states.

And again, your reverences,
self ought to be reflected upon by self thus by a monk:

'Now, am I one who is wrathful,
overpowered [130] by wrath?'

If, your reverences,
while the monk is reflecting,
he knows thus:

'I am one who is wrathful,
overpowered by wrath,'
then, your reverences,
that monk should strive
to get rid of those evil unskilled states.

But if, your reverences, that monk,
while reflecting,
knows thus:

'I am not one who is wrathful,
overpowered by wrath,'
then, with rapture and delight,
they should be forsaken by that monk,
training day and night in skilled states.

And again, your reverences,
self ought to be reflected upon by self thus by a monk:

'Now, am I one who is wrathful,
and a fault-finder because of wrath?'

If, your reverences,
while the monk is reflecting,
he knows thus:

'I am one who is wrathful,
and a fault-finder because of wrath,'
then, your reverences,
that monk should strive
to get rid of those evil unskilled states.

But if, your reverences, that monk,
while reflecting,
knows thus:

'I am not one who is wrathful,
and a fault-finder because of wrath,'
then, with rapture and delight,
they should be forsaken by that monk,
training day and night in skilled states.

And again, your reverences,
self ought to be reflected upon by self thus by a monk:

'Now, am I one who is wrathful,
and takes offence because of wrath?'

If, your reverences,
while the monk is reflecting,
he knows thus:

'I am one who is wrathful,
and takes offence because of wrath,'
then, your reverences,
that monk should strive
to get rid of those evil unskilled states.

But if, your reverences, that monk,
while reflecting,
knows thus:

'I am not one who is wrathful,
and takes offence because of wrath,'
then, with rapture and delight,
they should be forsaken by that monk,
training day and night in skilled states.

And again, your reverences,
self ought to be reflected upon by self thus by a monk:

'Now, am I one who is wrathful,
and who because of wrath utters words bordering on wrath?'

If, your reverences,
while the monk is reflecting,
he knows thus:

'I am one who is wrathful,
and who because of wrath utters words bordering on wrath,'
then, your reverences,
that monk should strive
to get rid of those evil unskilled states.

But if, your reverences, that monk,
while reflecting,
knows thus:

'I am not one who is wrathful,
and who because of wrath utters words bordering on wrath,'
then, with rapture and delight,
they should be forsaken by that monk,
training day and night in skilled states.

And again, your reverences,
self ought to be reflected upon by self thus by a monk:

'Now, am I one who, reproved,
blurts out reproof against the reprover?'

If, your reverences,
while the monk is reflecting,
he knows thus:

'I am one who, reproved,
blurts out reproof against the reprover,'
then, your reverences,
that monk should strive
to get rid of those evil unskilled states.

But if, your reverences, that monk,
while reflecting,
knows thus:

'I am not one who, reproved,
blurts out reproof against the reprover,'
then, with rapture and delight,
they should be forsaken by that monk,
training day and night in skilled states.

And again, your reverences,
self ought to be reflected upon by self thus by a monk:

'Now, do I, reproved,
disparage the reprover for the reproof?'

If, your reverences,
while the monk is reflecting,
he knows thus:

'I, reproved,
disparage the reprover for the reproof,'
then, your reverences,
that monk should strive
to get rid of those evil unskilled states.

But if, your reverences, that monk,
while reflecting,
knows thus:

'I, reproved, do not
disparage the reprover for the reproof,'
then, with rapture and delight,
they should be forsaken by that monk,
training day and night in skilled states.

And again, your reverences,
self ought to be reflected upon by self thus by a monk:

'Now, do I, reproved,
round on the reprover for the reproof?'

If, your reverences,
while the monk is reflecting,
he knows thus:

'I, reproved,
round on the reprover for the reproof,'
then, your reverences,
that monk should strive
to get rid of those evil unskilled states.

But if, your reverences, that monk,
while reflecting,
knows thus:

'I, reproved, do not
round on the reprover for the reproof,'
then, with rapture and delight,
they should be forsaken by that monk,
training day and night in skilled states.

And again, your reverences,
self ought to be reflected upon by self thus by a monk:

'Now, do I, reproved,
shelve the question by (asking) the reprover another,
do I speak off the point,
do I evince temper,
ill-will
and sulkiness?'

If, your reverences,
while the monk is reflecting,
he knows thus:

'I, reproved,
shelve the question by (asking) the reprover another,
speak off the point,
evince temper,
ill-will
and sulkiness,'
then, your reverences,
that monk should strive
to get rid of those evil unskilled states.

But if, your reverences, that monk,
while reflecting,
knows thus:

'I, reproved, do not
shelve the question by (asking) the reprover another,
do not speak off the point,
I do not evince temper,
ill-will
and sulkiness,'
then, with rapture and delight,
they should be forsaken by that monk,
training day and night in skilled states.

And again, your reverences,
self ought to be reflected upon by self thus by a monk:

'Now, do I, reproved,
succeed in explaining my movements to the reprover?'

If, your reverences,
while the monk is reflecting,
he knows thus:

'I, reproved, do not
succeed in explaining my movements to the reprover,'
then, your reverences,
that monk should strive
to get rid of those evil unskilled states.

But if, your reverences, that monk,
while reflecting,
knows thus:

'I, reproved, do
succeed in explaining my movements to the reprover,'
then, with rapture and delight,
they should be forsaken by that monk,
training day and night in skilled states.

And again, your reverences,
self ought to be reflected upon by self thus by a monk:

'Now, am I harsh,
spiteful?'

If, your reverences,
while the monk is reflecting,
he knows thus:

'I, am harsh,
spiteful,'
then, your reverences,
that monk should strive
to get rid of those evil unskilled states.

But if, your reverences, that monk,
while reflecting,
knows thus:

'I, am not harsh,
spiteful
then, with rapture and delight,
they should be forsaken by that monk,
training day and night in skilled states.

And again, your reverences,
self ought to be reflected upon by self thus by a monk:

'Now, am I envious,
grudging?'

If, your reverences,
while the monk is reflecting,
he knows thus:

'I, am envious,
grudging,'
then, your reverences,
that monk should strive
to get rid of those evil unskilled states.

But if, your reverences, that monk,
while reflecting,
knows thus:

'I, am not envious,
grudging,
then, with rapture and delight,
they should be forsaken by that monk,
training day and night in skilled states.

And again, your reverences,
self ought to be reflected upon by self thus by a monk:

'Now, am I treacherous,
deceitful?'

If, your reverences,
while the monk is reflecting,
he knows thus:

'I, am treacherous,
deceitful,'
then, your reverences,
that monk should strive
to get rid of those evil unskilled states.

But if, your reverences, that monk,
while reflecting,
knows thus:

'I, am not treacherous,
deceitful,
then, with rapture and delight,
they should be forsaken by that monk,
training day and night in skilled states.

And again, your reverences,
self ought to be reflected upon by self thus by a monk:

'Now, am I stubborn,
proud?'

If, your reverences,
while the monk is reflecting,
he knows thus:

'I, am stubborn,
proud,'
then, your reverences,
that monk should strive
to get rid of those evil unskilled states.

But if, your reverences, that monk,
while reflecting,
knows thus:

'I, am not stubborn,
proud,
then, with rapture and delight,
they should be forsaken by that monk,
training day and night in skilled states.

And again, your reverences,
self ought to be reflected upon by self thus by a monk:

'Now, am I one to seize the temporal,
grasping it tightly,
not letting go of it easily?'

If, your reverences,
while the monk is reflecting,
he knows thus:

'I, am one to seize the temporal,
grasping it tightly,
not letting go of it easily,'
then, your reverences,
that monk should strive
to get rid of those evil unskilled states.

But if, your reverences, that monk,
while reflecting,
knows thus:

'I, am not one to seize the temporal,
grasping it tightly,
not letting go of it easily,
then, with rapture and delight,
[131] they should be forsaken by that monk,
training day and night in skilled states.

 


 

If, your reverences,
while reflecting,
a monk beholds that all these evil unskilled states
are not got rid of in himself,
then, your reverences,
that monk must strive
to get rid of all these evil unskilled states.

But if, your reverences,
while reflecting,
a monk beholds that all these evil unskilled states
are got rid of in himself,
then, your reverences,
with rapture and delight
that monk should forsake them,
training day and night in skilled states.[18]

Your reverences,
it is like a woman or a man,
young,
in the prime of life,
and fond of ornaments
who is pondering on his own reflection
in a mirror that is quite clear,
quite pure,
or in a bowl of limpid water.[19]

If he sees dust or blemish there,
he strives to get rid of that dust or blemish.

But if he does not see dust or blemish there,
he is pleased in consequence and thinks:

'Indeed, this is good for me,
indeed I am quite clean.'

Even so, your reverences,
if a monk, while reflecting,
beholds that all these evil unskilled states in the self are not got rid of,
then, your reverences,
he strives to get rid of all these evil, unskilled states.

But if, your reverences,
the monk, while reflecting,
beholds that all these evil unskilled states in the self are got rid of,
then, your reverences,
with rapture and delight
that monk should forsake them,
training day and night in skilled states." Thus spoke the venerable Moggallāna the Great.

Delighted, these monks rejoiced in what the venerable Moggallāna the Great had said.

Discourse on Measuring in Accordance with:
the Fifth

 


[1] Referred to at MA. ii. 246. MA. ii. 67 says that this Sutta was known to the Ancients as the Bhikkhu-pātimokkha, and should be reflected upon three times daily. It should be compared with Sangh. XII (Vin. iii. 177-79) and see B.D. i. Intr. xxviii f. and pp. 309-13 for notes. Note that the Buddha is not mentioned in this discourse. Anumāna may mean "inference," or "argument."

[2] This is not giri, hill, but gira, a sound, utterance. MA. ii. 65 says Sumsumāragira is the name of a town. When the foundations were being laid, a crocodile, sumsumāra, in a pool nearby made a sound, let forth an utterance, giraɱ nicchāresi, and so they gave the town this name when it had been built. See B.D. ii. 398.

[3] MA. ii. 66, let them exhort and instruct.

[4] dubbaca, see B.D. i. 310, n. 1.

[5] MA. ii. 66: he says, Why do you speak to me? I know for myself what is allowable and what is not, what has error and what has not, what is the goal and what is not.

[6] Cf. A. ii. 113: This is destruction in the disciphne for an ariyan: when both a Tathāgata and fellow Brahma-farers deem that a man to be tamed is not to be spoken to, not to be instructed.

[7] Cf. M. i. 19.

[8] Or, grudge-bearer.

[9] cudito, reproved for a fault. Cf. A. iv. 193, and Vin. i. 173, ii. 248 ff.

[10] paccāropeti. He says, But it is you who have fallen into such and such an offence - you confess first. Cf. A. iv. 193.

[11] aññen'aññaɱ paṭicarati; see B.D. ii. 164, n. 4.

[12] bahiddhā kathaɱ apanāmeti, takes the talk outside. M.A. ii. 66 gives as an example, if he is asked whether he has fallen into such and such an offence, he answers that he is going to Pāṭaliputta.

[13] apadāne. MA. ii. 66 attano cariyāya. He is not able to explain where he was staying, on whom or what depending, what he was doing at that time or where he was or what another was doing or where he was. Colloquially "goings on."

[14] As at M. i. 42-3, ii. 245; Vin. ii. 89; A. iii. 335; D. iii. 45, 246-47.

[15] As at M. i. 43.

[16]I.e. in these sixteen qualities, MA. ii. 67.

[17] attanā va attānaɱ anuminitabbam. The last word no doubt helps to give this Sutta its title, anumāna. It means inferring, drawing a deduction, and is explained at MA. ii. 67 by anumetabbo, tuletabbo, tīretabbo, to be measured, weighed, decided upon.

[18] MA. ii. 67 notices the fivefold pahāna, getting rid of. The last one is the getting rid of by "escape," nismraṇa, when one has come to nibbāna. Cf. SnA. 8; Asl. 351 (Expos. ii. 454).

[19] Cf. Vin. ii. 107; D. i. 80; S. iii. 105.


Contact:
E-mail
Copyright Statement   Webmaster's Page