Majjhima Nikaya


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Majjhima Nikāya
I. Mūlapaṇṇāsa
2. Sīhanāda Vagga

The Middle Length Sayings
I. The First Fifty Discourses
2. The Division of the Lion's Roar

Sutta 18

Madhu-Piṇḍika Suttaɱ

Discourse of the Honey-Ball

Translated from the Pali by I.B. Horner, M.A.
Associate of Newham College, Cambridge
First Published in 1954

Copyright The Pali Text Society
Commercial Rights Reserved
Creative Commons Licence
For details see Terms of Use.

 


 

[1][chlm][upal][than] THUS have I heard:

At one time the Lord was staying among the Sakyans in Nigrodha's monastery
in Kapilavatthu.

Then the Lord,
having dressed in the morning,
taking his bowl and robe,
entered Kapilavatthu for almsfood.

Having walked in Kapilavatthu for almsfood,
returning from (the quest for) alms after the meal,
he approached the Great Wood[1]
for the day-sojourn.

Having plunged into the Great Wood,
he sat down for the day-sojourn
at the root of a young vilva tree.

Then the Sakyan, Stick-in-hand,[2]
who was always pacing up and down,
always roaming about on foot,[3]
approached the Great Wood;
having plunged into the Great Wood,
he approached the young vilva tree
and the Lord;
having approached,
he exchanged greetings with the Lord;
having exchanged greetings of friendliness and courtesy,
he stood at one side
leaning on his stick.

As he was standing at one side
leaning on his stick,
the Sakyan, Stick-in-hand, spoke thus to the Lord:

"What is the teaching[4] of the recluse,
of what views[5] is he?"

"According to my teaching, sir,
in the world
with its devas,
Māras and Brahmas,
with its creation
with recluses and brahmans,
with devas and men,
there is no contending with anyone in the world;[6]
for which reason perceptions do not obsess that brahman[7]
as he [142] fares along
not fettered to sense-pleasures,
without questionings,
remorse[8] cut off,
and who is devoid of craving
for becoming and non-becoming.[9]

This, sir, is my teaching,
this my view."

When this had been said,
the Sakyan, Stick-in-hand,
shaking his head[10]
and wagging his tongue,
departed leaning on his stick,
his brow furrowed into three wrinkles.[11]

 


 

Then the Lord, emerging from solitude towards evening,
approached Nigrodha's monastery;
having'approached,
he sat down on the appointed seat.

As he was sitting down
the Lord addressed the monks, saying:

"Now I, monks, having dressed in the morning,
taking my bowl and robe,
entered Kapilavatthu for almsfood.

Having walked in Kapilavatthu for almsfood,
returning from the (quest for) alms after the meal,
I approached the Great Wood for the day-sojourn.

Having plunged into the Great Wood,
I sat down for the day-sojourn
at the root of a young vilva tree.

Then the Sakyan, Stick-in-hand,
who was always pacing up and down,
always roaming about on foot,
approached the Great Wood;
having plunged into the Great Wood,
he approached the young vilva tree
and me;
having approached,
he exchanged greetings with me;
having exchanged greetings of friendliness and courtesy,
he stood at one side
leaning on his stick.

As he was standing at one side
leaning on his stick,
the Sakyan, Stick-in-hand, spoke thus to me:

'What is the teaching of the recluse,
of what views is he?'

'According to my teaching, sir,
in the world
with its devas,
Māras and Brahmas,
with its creation
with recluses and brahmans,
with devas and men,
there is no contending with anyone in the world;
for which reason perceptions do not obsess that brahman
as he fares along
not fettered to sense-pleasures,
without questionings,
remorse cut off,
and who is devoid of craving
for becoming and non-becoming.

This, sir, is my teaching,
this my view.'

When this had been said,
the Sakyan, Stick-in-hand,
shaking his head
and wagging his tongue,
departed leaning on his stick,
his brow furrowed into three wrinkles."

 


 

When he had spoken thus,
a certain monk spoke thus to the Lord:

"But what is this teaching, Lord,
whereby the Lord,
in the world with its devas,
Māras and Brahmas,
with its creation
with recluses and brahmans,
would not contend with anyone in the world?

And how is it, Lord,
that perceptions do not obsess the Lord,
that brahman,[12] as he is faring along,
not fettered to sense-pleasures,
without [143] questionings,
remorse cut off,
and who is devoid of craving
for becoming and non-becoming?"

"Whatever is the origin, monk,
of the number of obsessions and perceptions[13]
which assail a man,
if there is nothing to rejoice at,
to welcome,
to catch hold of,
this is itself an end of a propensity to attachment,
this is itself an end of a propensity to repugnance,
this is itself an end of a propensity to views,
this is itself an end of a propensity to perplexity,
this is itself an end of a propensity to pride,
this is itself an end of a propensity to attachment to becoming,
this is itself an end of a propensity to ignorance,
this is itself an end of taking the stick,
of taking a weapon,
of quarrelling,
contending,
disputing,
accusation,
slander,
lying speech.[14]

In these ways,
these evil unskilled states
are stopped without remainder."

Thus spoke the Lord.

Having said this,
the Well-farer,
rising from his seat,
entered a dwelling-place.

 


 

Soon after the Lord had gone away
it occurred to these monks:

"Your reverences,
the Lord, having recited this recital to us in brief,
but not having explained the meaning in full,
rising from his seat,
entered a dwelling-place:

'Whatever is the origin, monk,
of the number of obsessions and perceptions
which assail a man,
if there is nothing to rejoice at,
to welcome,
to catch hold of,
this is itself an end of a propensity to attachment,
this is itself an end of a propensity to repugnance,
this is itself an end of a propensity to views,
this is itself an end of a propensity to perplexity,
this is itself an end of a propensity to pride,
this is itself an end of a propensity to attachment to becoming,
this is itself an end of a propensity to ignorance,
this is itself an end of taking the stick,
of taking a weapon,
of quarrelling,
contending,
disputing,
accusation,
slander,
lying speech.

In these ways,
these evil unskilled states
are stopped without remainder.'

Now, who can explain the meaning in full
of this recital
recited in brief by the Lord
but whose meaning was not explained in full?"

Then it occurred to these monks:

"Now the venerable Kaccāna the Great
is both praised by the Lord
and revered by intelligent fellow Brahma-farers.

The venerable Kaccāna the Great is able to explain in full
the meaning of this recital
recited in brief by the Lord,
but whose meaning was not explained in full.

Suppose we were to approach the venerable Kaccāna the Great and,
having approached,
were to question him on this meaning?"

Then these monks approached the venerable Kaccāna the Great;
having approached,
they exchanged greetings with the venerable Kaccāna the Great;
having exchanged greetings of friendHness and courtesy,
they sat down at a respectful distance.

As they were sitting down at a respectful distance,
these monks spoke thus to the venerable Kaccāna the Great:

"Reverend Kaccāna,
the Lord having recited this recital to us in brief,
but not having explained the meaning in full,
rising from his seat,
entered a dwelling-place:

'Whatever is the origin, monk,
of the number of obsessions and perceptions
which assail a man,
if there is nothing to rejoice at,
to welcome,
to catch hold of,
this is itself an end of a propensity to attachment,
this is itself an end of a propensity to repugnance,
this is itself an end of a propensity to views,
this is itself an end of a propensity to perplexity,
this is itself an end of a propensity to pride,
this is itself an end of a propensity to attachment to becoming,
this is itself an end of a propensity to ignorance,
this is itself an end of taking the stick,
of taking a weapon,
of quarrelling,
contending,
disputing,
accusation,
slander,
lying speech.

In these ways,
these evil unskilled states
are stopped without remainder.'

Soon after the Lord had gone [144] away,
it occurred to us:

'This venerable Kaccāna the Great
is both praised by the Lord
and revered by intelligent fellow Brahma-farers;
the venerable Kaccāna the Great is able to explain in full
the meaning of this recital
recited in brief by the Lord
but whose meaning was not explained in full.

Suppose we were to approach the venerable Kaccāna the Great and,
having approached,
were to question him on this meaning.'

May the venerable Kaccāna the Great explain it."

"Your reverences,
as a man walking about aiming at the pith,[15]
searching for the pith,
looking about for the pith
of a great, stable and pithy tree,
passing by the root,
passing by the trunk,
might think that the pith is to be looked for
in the branches and foliage -
even so is this performance of the venerable ones,
for (although) you had the Teacher face to face,
yet having ignored that Lord,
you judge that it is I who should be questioned on this meaning.

But, your reverences,
the Lord knows what should be known,
sees what should be seen,[16]
he has become vision,
become knowledge,
become dhamma,
become Brahma,
he is the propounder,
the expounder,
the bringer to the goal,[17]
the giver of the Deathless,
dhamma-lord,
Tathāgata.

That was the time
when you should have questioned the Lord on this meaning
so that you might have understood
what the Lord explained to you."

"Undoubtedly, Kaccāna,
the Lord knows what should be known,
sees what should be seen,
he has become vision,
become knowledge,
become dhamma,
become Brahma,
he is the propounder,
the expounder,
the bringer to the goal,
the giver of the Deathless,
dhamma-lord,
Tathāgata.

But the venerable Kaccāna the Great
is both praised by the Lord,
and revered by intelhgent fellow Brahma-farers,
and the venerable Kaccāna the Great is able to explain in full
the meaning of that recital
recited in brief by the Lord
but whose meaning was not explained in full.

Let the venerable Kaccāna explain,
without finding it troublesome."

 


 

"Well then, your reverences,
listen,
pay careful attention
and I will speak."

"Yes, your reverence,"
these monks answered the venerable Kaccāna the Great in assent.

The venerable Kaccāna the Great spoke thus:

[145] "In regard to that recital, your reverences,
which the Lord recited in brief,
but not having explained the meaning in full,
rising from his seat,
entered a dwelling-place:

'Whatever is the origin, monk,
of the number of obsessions and perceptions
which assail a man,
if there is nothing to rejoice at,
to welcome,
to catch hold of,
this is itself an end of a propensity to attachment,
this is itself an end of a propensity to repugnance,
this is itself an end of a propensity to views,
this is itself an end of a propensity to perplexity,
this is itself an end of a propensity to pride,
this is itself an end of a propensity to attachment to becoming,
this is itself an end of a propensity to ignorance,
this is itself an end of taking the stick,
of taking a weapon,
of quarrelling,
contending,
disputing,
accusation,
slander,
lying speech.

In these ways,
these evil unskilled states
are stopped without remainder,'
of that recital
recited by the Lord in brief
but whose meaning was not explained in full,
I understand the meaning in full thus:

Visual consciousness,[18] your reverences,
arises because of eye and material shapes;
the meeting of the three
is sensory impingement;[19]
feelings are because of sensory impingement;
what one feels
one perceives;
what one perceives
one reasons about;[20]
what one reasons about
obsesses one;
what obsesses one
is the origin of the number of perceptions and obsessions
which assail a man
in regard to material shapes cognisable by the eye,
past,
future,
present.

And, your reverences, auditory consciousness
arises because of ear and sounds;
the meeting of the three
is sensory impingement;
feelings are because of sensory impingement;
what one feels
one perceives;
what one perceives
one reasons about;
what one reasons about
obsesses one;
what obsesses one
is the origin of the number of perceptions and obsessions
which assail a man
in regard to sounds cognisable by the ear,
past,
future,
present.

And, your reverences, olfactory consciousness
arises because of nose and smells;
the meeting of the three
is sensory impingement;
feelings are because of sensory impingement;
what one feels
one perceives;
what one perceives
one reasons about;
what one reasons about
obsesses one;
what obsesses one
is the origin of the number of perceptions and obsessions
which assail a man
in regard to smells cognisable by the nose,
past,
future,
present.

And, your reverences, gustatory consciousness arises
because of tongue and tastes;
the meeting of the three
is sensory impingement;
feelings are because of sensory impingement;
what one feels
one perceives;
what one perceives
one reasons about;
what one reasons about
obsesses one;
what obsesses one
is the origin of the number of perceptions and obsessions
which assail a man
in regard to tastes cognisable by the tongue,
past,
future,
present.

And, your reverences, bodily consciousness arises
because of body and touches;
the meeting of the three
is sensory impingement;
feelings are because of sensory impingement;
what one feels
one perceives;
what one perceives
one reasons about;
what one reasons about
obsesses one;
what obsesses one
is the origin of the number of perceptions and obsessions
which assail a man
in regard to touches cognisable by the body,
past,
future,
present.

And, your reverences, mental consciousness[21] arises
because of mind[22] and mental objects;
the meeting of the three
is sensory impingement;
feelings are because of sensory impingement;
what one feels
one perceives;
what one perceives
one reasons about;
what one reasons about
obsesses one;
what obsesses one
is the origin of the number of perceptions and obsessions
which assail a man
in regard to mental objects cognisable by mind,
past,
future,
present.

 


 

This situation occurs:
that when there is eye, your reverences,
when there is material shape,
when there is visual consciousness,
one will recognise the manifestation of sensory impingement.

This situation occurs:
that when there is the manifestation of sensory impingement,
one will recognise the manifestation of feeling.

This situation occurs:
that when there is the manifestation of feeling,
one will recognise the manifestation of perception.

This situation occurs:
that when there is the manifestation of perception,
one will recognise the manifestation of reasoning.

This situation occurs:
that when there is the manifestation of reasoning,
one will recognise [146] the manifestation
of the assault of a number of obsessions and perceptions.

This situation occurs:
that when there is ear, your reverences,
when there is sound,
when there is auditory consciousness,
one will recognise the manifestation of sensory impingement.

This situation occurs:
that when there is the manifestation of sensory impingement,
one will recognise the manifestation of feeling.

This situation occurs:
that when there is the manifestation of feeling,
one will recognise the manifestation of perception.

This situation occurs:
that when there is the manifestation of perception,
one will recognise the manifestation of reasoning.

This situation occurs:
that when there is the manifestation of reasoning,
one will recognise the manifestation
of the assault of a number of obsessions and perceptions.

This situation occurs:
that when there is nose, your reverences,
when there is smell,
when there is olfactory consciousness,
one will recognise the manifestation of sensory impingement.

This situation occurs:
that when there is the manifestation of sensory impingement,
one will recognise the manifestation of feeling.

This situation occurs:
that when there is the manifestation of feeling,
one will recognise the manifestation of perception.

This situation occurs:
that when there is the manifestation of perception,
one will recognise the manifestation of reasoning.

This situation occurs:
that when there is the manifestation of reasoning,
one will recognise the manifestation
of the assault of a number of obsessions and perceptions.

This situation occurs:
that when there is tongue, your reverences,
when there is taste,
when there is gustatory consciousness,
one will recognise the manifestation of sensory impingement.

This situation occurs:
that when there is the manifestation of sensory impingement,
one will recognise the manifestation of feeling.

This situation occurs:
that when there is the manifestation of feeling,
one will recognise the manifestation of perception.

This situation occurs:
that when there is the manifestation of perception,
one will recognise the manifestation of reasoning.

This situation occurs:
that when there is the manifestation of reasoning,
one will recognise the manifestation
of the assault of a number of obsessions and perceptions.

This situation occurs:
that when there is body, your reverences,
when there is touch,
when there is bodily consciousness,
one will recognise the manifestation of sensory impingement.

This situation occurs:
that when there is the manifestation of sensory impingement,
one will recognise the manifestation of feeling.

This situation occurs:
that when there is the manifestation of feeling,
one will recognise the manifestation of perception.

This situation occurs:
that when there is the manifestation of perception,
one will recognise the manifestation of reasoning.

This situation occurs:
that when there is the manifestation of reasoning,
one will recognise the manifestation
of the assault of a number of obsessions and perceptions.

This situation occurs:
that when there is mind, your reverences,
when there is a mental object,
when there is mental consciousness,
one will recognise the manifestation of sensory impingement.

This situation occurs:
that when there is the manifestation of sensory impingement,
one will recognise the manifestation of feeling.

This situation occurs:
that when there is the manifestation of feeling,
one will recognise the manifestation of perception.

This situation occurs:
that when there is the manifestation of perception,
one will recognise the manifestation of reasoning.

This situation occurs:
that when there is the manifestation of reasoning,
one will recognise the manifestation
of the assault of a number of obsessions and perceptions.

 


 

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not eye, your reverences,
when there is not material shape,
when there is not visual consciousness,
one will recognise a manifestation of sensory impingement.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not a manifestation of sensory impingement,
one will recognise a manifestation of feeling.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not a manifestation of feeling
one will recognise a manifestation of perception.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not a manifestation of perception
one will recognise a manifestation of reasoning.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not a manifestation of reasoning
one will recognise a manifestation
of the assault of a number of obsessions and perceptions.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not ear, your reverences,
when there is not sound,
when there is not auditory consciousness,
one will recognise a manifestation of sensory impingement.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not a manifestation of sensory impingement,
one will recognise a manifestation of feeling.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not a manifestation of feeling
one will recognise a manifestation of perception.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not a manifestation of perception
one will recognise a manifestation of reasoning.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not a manifestation of reasoning
one will recognise a manifestation
of the assault of a number of obsessions and perceptions.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not nose, your reverences,
when there is not smell,
when there is not olfactory consciousness,
one will recognise a manifestation of sensory impingement.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not a manifestation of sensory impingement,
one will recognise a manifestation of feeling.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not a manifestation of feeling
one will recognise a manifestation of perception.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not a manifestation of perception
one will recognise a manifestation of reasoning.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not a manifestation of reasoning
one will recognise a manifestation
of the assault of a number of obsessions and perceptions.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not tongue, your reverences,
when there is not taste,
when there is not gustatory consciousness,
one will recognise a manifestation of sensory impingement.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not a manifestation of sensory impingement,
one will recognise a manifestation of feeling.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not a manifestation of feeling
one will recognise a manifestation of perception.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not a manifestation of perception
one will recognise a manifestation of reasoning.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not a manifestation of reasoning
one will recognise a manifestation
of the assault of a number of obsessions and perceptions.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not body, your reverences,
when there is not touch,
when there is not bodily consciousness,
one will recognise a manifestation of sensory impingement.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not a manifestation of sensory impingement,
one will recognise a manifestation of feeling.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not a manifestation of feeling
one will recognise a manifestation of perception.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not a manifestation of perception
one will recognise a manifestation of reasoning.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not a manifestation of reasoning
one will recognise a manifestation
of the assault of a number of obsessions and perceptions.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not mind, your reverences,
when there is not a mental object,
when there is not mental consciousness,
one will recognise a manifestation of sensory impingement.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not a manifestation of sensory impingement,
one will recognise a manifestation of feeling.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not a manifestation of feeling
one will recognise a manifestation of perception.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not a manifestation of perception
one will recognise a manifestation of reasoning.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not a manifestation of reasoning
one will recognise a manifestation
of the assault of a number of obsessions and perceptions.

"In regard to that recital, your reverences,
which the Lord recited in brief,
but not having explained the meaning in full,
rising from his seat,
entered a dwelling-place:

'Whatever is the origin, monk,
of the number of obsessions and perceptions
which assail a man,
if there is nothing to rejoice at,
to welcome,
to catch hold of,
this is itself an end of a propensity to attachment,
this is itself an end of a propensity to repugnance,
this is itself an end of a propensity to views,
this is itself an end of a propensity to perplexity,
this is itself an end of a propensity to pride,
this is itself an end of a propensity to attachment to becoming,
this is itself an end of a propensity to ignorance,
this is itself an end of taking the stick,
of taking a weapon,
of quarrelling,
contending,
disputing,
accusation,
slander,
lying speech,'
of that recital
recited by the Lord in brief
but whose meaning was not explained in full,
I understand the meaning in full thus.

But if you, venerable ones, so desire,
having approached the Lord,
you can question him as to this meaning
so that as the Lord explains it to you
so may you understand it."

 


 

Then these monks,
delighting and rejoicing in what the venerable Kaccāna the Great had said,
rising from their seats,
approached the Lord;
having approached,
having greeted the Lord,
they sat down at a respectful distance.

As they were sitting down at a respectful distance,
these monks spoke thus to the Lord: [147]

"Lord, the Lord having recited this recital to us in brief,
rising from his seat,
entered a dwelling-place:

'Whatever is the origin, monk,
of the number of obsessions and perceptions
which assail a man,
if there is nothing to rejoice at,
to welcome,
to catch hold of,
this is itself an end of a propensity to attachment,
this is itself an end of a propensity to repugnance,
this is itself an end of a propensity to views,
this is itself an end of a propensity to perplexity,
this is itself an end of a propensity to pride,
this is itself an end of a propensity to attachment to becoming,
this is itself an end of a propensity to ignorance,
this is itself an end of taking the stick,
of taking a weapon,
of quarrelling,
contending,
disputing,
accusation,
slander,
lying speech.

In these ways,
these evil unskilled states
are stopped without remainder.'

Now, Lord, soon after the Lord had gone away,
it occurred to us:

'The Lord, having recited this recital to us in brief,
but without explaining its meaning in full,
rising from his seat,
entered a dwelling-place:

"Whatever is the origin, monk,
of the number of obsessions and perceptions
which assail a man,
if there is nothing to rejoice at,
to welcome,
to catch hold of,
this is itself an end of a propensity to attachment,
this is itself an end of a propensity to repugnance,
this is itself an end of a propensity to views,
this is itself an end of a propensity to perplexity,
this is itself an end of a propensity to pride,
this is itself an end of a propensity to attachment to becoming,
this is itself an end of a propensity to ignorance,
this is itself an end of taking the stick,
of taking a weapon,
of quarrelling,
contending,
disputing,
accusation,
slander,
lying speech.

In these ways,
these evil unskilled states
are stopped without remainder."

Now, who can explain in full
the meaning of this recital
recited in brief by the Lord
but whose meaning was not explained in full?'

Then, Lord, it occurred to us:

'Now the venerable Kaccāna the Great is both praised by the Lord
and revered by intelhgent fellow Brahma-farers.

The venerable Kaccāna the Great is able to explain in full
the meaning of this recital
recited in brief by the Lord,
but whose meaning was not explained in full.

Suppose we were to approach the venerable Kaccāna the Great;
and having approached
were to question the venerable Kaccāna the Great on this meaning?'

Then we, Lord, approached the venerable Kaccāna the Great;
having approached,
we questioned the venerable Kaccāna the Great on this meaning.

The meaning of those (words) was explained to us, Lord,
by the venerable Kaccāna the Great
by these methods,
by these sentences,[23] by these words."[24][ed1]

 

"Your reverences,
as a man walking about aiming at the pith,
searching for the pith,
looking about for the pith
of a great, stable and pithy tree,
passing by the root,
passing by the trunk,
might think that the pith is to be looked for
in the branches and foliage -
even so is this performance of the venerable ones,
for (although) you had the Teacher face to face,
yet having ignored that Lord,
you judge that it is I who should be questioned on this meaning.

But, your reverences,
the Lord knows what should be known,
sees what should be seen,
he has become vision,
become knowledge,
become dhamma,
become Brahma,
he is the propounder,
the expounder,
the bringer to the goal,
the giver of the Deathless,
dhamma-lord,
Tathāgata.

That was the time
when you should have questioned the Lord on this meaning
so that you might have understood
what the Lord explained to you."

"Undoubtedly, Kaccāna,
the Lord knows what should be known,
sees what should be seen,
he has become vision,
become knowledge,
become dhamma,
become Brahma,
he is the propounder,
the expounder,
the bringer to the goal,
the giver of the Deathless,
dhamma-lord,
Tathāgata.

But the venerable Kaccāna the Great
is both praised by the Lord,
and revered by intelhgent fellow Brahma-farers,
and the venerable Kaccāna the Great is able to explain in full
the meaning of that recital
recited in brief by the Lord
but whose meaning was not explained in full.

Let the venerable Kaccāna explain,
without finding it troublesome."

 


 

"Well then, your reverences,
listen,
pay careful attention
and I will speak."

"Yes, your reverence,"
these monks answered the venerable Kaccāna the Great in assent.

The venerable Kaccāna the Great spoke thus:

"In regard to that recital, your reverences,
which the Lord recited in brief,
but not having explained the meaning in full,
rising from his seat,
entered a dwelling-place:

'Whatever is the origin, monk,
of the number of obsessions and perceptions
which assail a man,
if there is nothing to rejoice at,
to welcome,
to catch hold of,
this is itself an end of a propensity to attachment,
this is itself an end of a propensity to repugnance,
this is itself an end of a propensity to views,
this is itself an end of a propensity to perplexity,
this is itself an end of a propensity to pride,
this is itself an end of a propensity to attachment to becoming,
this is itself an end of a propensity to ignorance,
this is itself an end of taking the stick,
of taking a weapon,
of quarrelling,
contending,
disputing,
accusation,
slander,
lying speech.

In these ways,
these evil unskilled states
are stopped without remainder,'
of that recital
recited by the Lord in brief
but whose meaning was not explained in full,
I understand the meaning in full thus:

Visual consciousness, your reverences,
arises because of eye and material shapes;
the meeting of the three
is sensory impingement;
feelings are because of sensory impingement;
what one feels
one perceives;
what one perceives
one reasons about;
what one reasons about
obsesses one;
what obsesses one
is the origin of the number of perceptions and obsessions
which assail a man
in regard to material shapes cognisable by the eye,
past,
future,
present.

And, your reverences, auditory consciousness
arises because of ear and sounds;
the meeting of the three
is sensory impingement;
feelings are because of sensory impingement;
what one feels
one perceives;
what one perceives
one reasons about;
what one reasons about
obsesses one;
what obsesses one
is the origin of the number of perceptions and obsessions
which assail a man
in regard to sounds cognisable by the ear,
past,
future,
present.

And, your reverences, olfactory consciousness
arises because of nose and smells;
the meeting of the three
is sensory impingement;
feelings are because of sensory impingement;
what one feels
one perceives;
what one perceives
one reasons about;
what one reasons about
obsesses one;
what obsesses one
is the origin of the number of perceptions and obsessions
which assail a man
in regard to smells cognisable by the nose,
past,
future,
present.

And, your reverences, gustatory consciousness arises
because of tongue and tastes;
the meeting of the three
is sensory impingement;
feelings are because of sensory impingement;
what one feels
one perceives;
what one perceives
one reasons about;
what one reasons about
obsesses one;
what obsesses one
is the origin of the number of perceptions and obsessions
which assail a man
in regard to tastes cognisable by the tongue,
past,
future,
present.

And, your reverences, bodily consciousness arises
because of body and touches;
the meeting of the three
is sensory impingement;
feelings are because of sensory impingement;
what one feels
one perceives;
what one perceives
one reasons about;
what one reasons about
obsesses one;
what obsesses one
is the origin of the number of perceptions and obsessions
which assail a man
in regard to touches cognisable by the body,
past,
future,
present.

And, your reverences, mental consciousness arises
because of mind and mental objects;
the meeting of the three
is sensory impingement;
feelings are because of sensory impingement;
what one feels
one perceives;
what one perceives
one reasons about;
what one reasons about
obsesses one;
what obsesses one
is the origin of the number of perceptions and obsessions
which assail a man
in regard to mental objects cognisable by mind,
past,
future,
present.

 


 

This situation occurs:
that when there is eye, your reverences,
when there is material shape,
when there is visual consciousness,
one will recognise the manifestation of sensory impingement.

This situation occurs:
that when there is the manifestation of sensory impingement,
one will recognise the manifestation of feeling.

This situation occurs:
that when there is the manifestation of feeling,
one will recognise the manifestation of perception.

This situation occurs:
that when there is the manifestation of perception,
one will recognise the manifestation of reasoning.

This situation occurs:
that when there is the manifestation of reasoning,
one will recognise the manifestation
of the assault of a number of obsessions and perceptions.

This situation occurs:
that when there is ear, your reverences,
when there is sound,
when there is auditory consciousness,
one will recognise the manifestation of sensory impingement.

This situation occurs:
that when there is the manifestation of sensory impingement,
one will recognise the manifestation of feeling.

This situation occurs:
that when there is the manifestation of feeling,
one will recognise the manifestation of perception.

This situation occurs:
that when there is the manifestation of perception,
one will recognise the manifestation of reasoning.

This situation occurs:
that when there is the manifestation of reasoning,
one will recognise the manifestation
of the assault of a number of obsessions and perceptions.

This situation occurs:
that when there is nose, your reverences,
when there is smell,
when there is olfactory consciousness,
one will recognise the manifestation of sensory impingement.

This situation occurs:
that when there is the manifestation of sensory impingement,
one will recognise the manifestation of feeling.

This situation occurs:
that when there is the manifestation of feeling,
one will recognise the manifestation of perception.

This situation occurs:
that when there is the manifestation of perception,
one will recognise the manifestation of reasoning.

This situation occurs:
that when there is the manifestation of reasoning,
one will recognise the manifestation
of the assault of a number of obsessions and perceptions.

This situation occurs:
that when there is tongue, your reverences,
when there is taste,
when there is gustatory consciousness,
one will recognise the manifestation of sensory impingement.

This situation occurs:
that when there is the manifestation of sensory impingement,
one will recognise the manifestation of feeling.

This situation occurs:
that when there is the manifestation of feeling,
one will recognise the manifestation of perception.

This situation occurs:
that when there is the manifestation of perception,
one will recognise the manifestation of reasoning.

This situation occurs:
that when there is the manifestation of reasoning,
one will recognise the manifestation
of the assault of a number of obsessions and perceptions.

This situation occurs:
that when there is body, your reverences,
when there is touch,
when there is bodily consciousness,
one will recognise the manifestation of sensory impingement.

This situation occurs:
that when there is the manifestation of sensory impingement,
one will recognise the manifestation of feeling.

This situation occurs:
that when there is the manifestation of feeling,
one will recognise the manifestation of perception.

This situation occurs:
that when there is the manifestation of perception,
one will recognise the manifestation of reasoning.

This situation occurs:
that when there is the manifestation of reasoning,
one will recognise the manifestation
of the assault of a number of obsessions and perceptions.

This situation occurs:
that when there is mind, your reverences,
when there is a mental object,
when there is mental consciousness,
one will recognise the manifestation of sensory impingement.

This situation occurs:
that when there is the manifestation of sensory impingement,
one will recognise the manifestation of feeling.

This situation occurs:
that when there is the manifestation of feeling,
one will recognise the manifestation of perception.

This situation occurs:
that when there is the manifestation of perception,
one will recognise the manifestation of reasoning.

This situation occurs:
that when there is the manifestation of reasoning,
one will recognise the manifestation
of the assault of a number of obsessions and perceptions.

 


 

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not eye, your reverences,
when there is not material shape,
when there is not visual consciousness,
one will recognise a manifestation of sensory impingement.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not a manifestation of sensory impingement,
one will recognise a manifestation of feeling.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not a manifestation of feeling
one will recognise a manifestation of perception.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not a manifestation of perception
one will recognise a manifestation of reasoning.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not a manifestation of reasoning
one will recognise a manifestation
of the assault of a number of obsessions and perceptions.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not ear, your reverences,
when there is not sound,
when there is not auditory consciousness,
one will recognise a manifestation of sensory impingement.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not a manifestation of sensory impingement,
one will recognise a manifestation of feeling.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not a manifestation of feeling
one will recognise a manifestation of perception.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not a manifestation of perception
one will recognise a manifestation of reasoning.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not a manifestation of reasoning
one will recognise a manifestation
of the assault of a number of obsessions and perceptions.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not nose, your reverences,
when there is not smell,
when there is not olfactory consciousness,
one will recognise a manifestation of sensory impingement.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not a manifestation of sensory impingement,
one will recognise a manifestation of feeling.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not a manifestation of feeling
one will recognise a manifestation of perception.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not a manifestation of perception
one will recognise a manifestation of reasoning.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not a manifestation of reasoning
one will recognise a manifestation
of the assault of a number of obsessions and perceptions.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not tongue, your reverences,
when there is not taste,
when there is not gustatory consciousness,
one will recognise a manifestation of sensory impingement.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not a manifestation of sensory impingement,
one will recognise a manifestation of feeling.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not a manifestation of feeling
one will recognise a manifestation of perception.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not a manifestation of perception
one will recognise a manifestation of reasoning.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not a manifestation of reasoning
one will recognise a manifestation
of the assault of a number of obsessions and perceptions.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not body, your reverences,
when there is not touch,
when there is not bodily consciousness,
one will recognise a manifestation of sensory impingement.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not a manifestation of sensory impingement,
one will recognise a manifestation of feeling.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not a manifestation of feeling
one will recognise a manifestation of perception.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not a manifestation of perception
one will recognise a manifestation of reasoning.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not a manifestation of reasoning
one will recognise a manifestation
of the assault of a number of obsessions and perceptions.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not mind, your reverences,
when there is not a mental object,
when there is not mental consciousness,
one will recognise a manifestation of sensory impingement.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not a manifestation of sensory impingement,
one will recognise a manifestation of feeling.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not a manifestation of feeling
one will recognise a manifestation of perception.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not a manifestation of perception
one will recognise a manifestation of reasoning.

This situation does not occur:
that when there is not a manifestation of reasoning
one will recognise a manifestation
of the assault of a number of obsessions and perceptions.

"In regard to that recital, your reverences,
which the Lord recited in brief,
but not having explained the meaning in full,
rising from his seat,
entered a dwelling-place:

'Whatever is the origin, monk,
of the number of obsessions and perceptions
which assail a man,
if there is nothing to rejoice at,
to welcome,
to catch hold of,
this is itself an end of a propensity to attachment,
this is itself an end of a propensity to repugnance,
this is itself an end of a propensity to views,
this is itself an end of a propensity to perplexity,
this is itself an end of a propensity to pride,
this is itself an end of a propensity to attachment to becoming,
this is itself an end of a propensity to ignorance,
this is itself an end of taking the stick,
of taking a weapon,
of quarrelling,
contending,
disputing,
accusation,
slander,
lying speech,'
of that recital
recited by the Lord in brief
but whose meaning was not explained in full,
I understand the meaning in full thus.

But if you, venerable ones, so desire,
having approached the Lord,
you can question him as to this meaning
so that as the Lord explains it to you
so may you understand it."

 

"Learned, monks, is Kaccāna the Great,
of great wisdom is Kaccāna the Great.

For if you, monks, had questioned me as to this meaning,
I too would have explained it precisely as it was explained by Kaccāna the Great.

Indeed, this is the exact meaning of that,
and thus should you understand it."[ed2]

When this had been said, the venerable Ānanda spoke thus to the [148] Lord:

"Lord, even as a man overcome by hunger and exhaustion
might come upon a honey-ball;[25]
from each bit that he would taste
he would get a sweet delicious[26] flavour -
even so, Lord, is a monk who is naturally able in mind;
from each bit that he would examine with intuitive wisdom
as to the meaning of this disquisition on dhamma,
he would get delight,
he would get satisfaction for the mind.

What is this disquisition on dhamma called, Lord?"

"Wherefore you, Ānanda, may understand this disquisition on dhamma as
'The Disquisition of the Honey-ball'."

Thus spoke the Lord.

Delighted, the venerable Ānanda rejoiced in what the Lord had said.

Discourse of the Honey-Ball:
the Eighth

 


[1] This Mahāvana near Kapilavatthu was virgin forest, uncultivated, stretching up to the Himalayas. It was not like the Mahāvana at Vesālī which was partly natural, partly cultivated, MA. ii. 73.

[2] Daṇḍapāṇi; so called because he used a golden walking stick although he was not old. He sided with Devadatta; so MA. ii. 73.

[3] Stock phrase, as e.g. at M. i. 227, ii. 118, iii. 128; D. i. 235; Sn. p. 105; A. i. 136, iii. 76. "For the sake of seeing parks, woods, mountains," MA. ii. 73.

[4] kimvādī. MA. ii. 73 kimdiṭṭhiko, of what views? Cf. Vin. i. 40.

[5] kimakkhāyī, what does he point out or show? MA. ii. 73, what does he talk about? Cf. Vin. i. 40.

[6] Cf. S. iii. 138 (quoted MA. ii. 74), "I do not dispute with the world, but the world disputes with me"; and an untraced quotation, "A dhamma-speaker disputes with no one, but a speaker of non-dhamma disputes" on such problems as impermanence, not-self, ill, the unlovely and their opposites.

[7] Who has destroyed the cankers, MA. ii. 74.

[8] chinnakukkucca, MA. ii. 74, gives two meanings for chinnakukkucca: vippaṭisāri, remorse, and hatthapāda, hands and feet.

[9] bhavābhave. MA. ii. 74, again and again becoming, or becoming that is low, or excellent; for an excellent becoming is called abhava, non-becoming, come to growth.

[10] As at M. i. 171.

[11] As at S. i. 118.

[12] Here the Lord is being referred to as "brahman."

[13] papañcasaññāsankhā. MA. ii. 75 explains sankhā by koṭṭhasa, and papañcasaññā as perceptions connected with obsessions, views, craving.

[14] Cf. M. i. 410, from "taking a stick."

[15] As at M. i. 195, iii. 194; A. v. 226 ff., 256 ff., etc.

[16] He knows and sees what is to be known and seen; he knows by knowing, sees by seeing, MA. ii. 76.

[17] attha, or matter, meaning.

[18] As at S. iv. 32.

[19] phassa, contact.

[20] vitakketi. On vitakka see D. ii. 277.

[21] Explained at MA. ii. 77 as "advertence" (āvajjana) and impulsion (javana).

[22] Explained at MA. ii. 77 as bhavangacitta, the unconscious or "sub-consciousness."

[23] MA. ii. 78, by a group of syllables (akkhara).Ibid., by individual syllables. Also M. i. 320.

[24] Ibid., by individual syllables. Also M. i. 320.

[25] Ibid., a large sweet cake; or, sugared meal made into cakes.

[26] asecanaka, to which nothing need be added, e.g. condiments; complete in itself.

 


[ed1] Ms. Horner following the Pali abridged thus. I have inserted in the box below the dialogue as it would have occurred and as it is usually repeated elsewhere in the Nikāyas.

[ed2] Here the usual case would have been that the Buddha repeated all that which had been said by Kaccāna the Great. This method of abridgment alone speaks to the fact that the Majjhima was compiled later than either the Anguttara Nikaya or the Samyutta Nikaya. It represents a lessening (however slight) of the respect for precision in recounting the events and sayings of the Buddha.


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