Majjhima Nikaya


[Site Map]  [Home]  [Sutta Indexes]  [Glossology]  [Site Sub-Sections]

The Pali is transliterated as IAST Unicode (āīūṃṅñṭḍṇḷ). Alternatives:
[ ASCII (aiumnntdnl) | Mobile (āīūŋńñţđņļ) | Velthuis (aaiiuu.m'n~n.t.d.n.l) ]

 

Majjhima Nikāya
III. Upari Paṇṇāsa
1. Devadaha Vagga

The Middle Length Sayings
III. The Final Fifty Discourses
1. The Devadaha Division

Sutta 102

Pañcattaya Suttaɱ

Discourse on the Threefold Five[1]

Translated from the Pali by I.B. Horner, M.A.
Associate of Newham College, Cambridge
First Published in 1954

Copyright The Pali Text Society
Commercial Rights Reserved
Creative Commons Licence
For details see Terms of Use.

 


 

[1][chlm][upal] THUS have I heard:

At one time the Lord was staying near Sāvatthī
in the Jeta Grove in Anāthapiṇḍika's monastery.

While he was there the Lord addressed the monks, saying:

"Monks."

"Revered One," these monks answered the Lord in assent.

The Lord spoke thus:

"There are, monks, some recluses and brahmans[2] who,
conjecturing about the future,[3]
speculating about the future,
in many a figure
maintain assertions concerning the future.[4]

[1] Some maintain[5] that after dying
the self, unimpaired,[6] perceives.[7]

[2] Some maintain[8] that after dying
the self, unimpaired, does not perceive.

[3] Some maintain[9] that after dying
the self, unimpaired, neither perceives nor does not perceive.

[4] They lay down[10] the cutting off,
the destruction,
the [16] disappearance[11] of the essential being.[12]

[5] Or some maintain there is nibbāna here and now.[13]

[1 (1-3)]Thus they lay down that after dying
the self, unimpaired, is existent.[14]

[2 (4)] Or they lay down the cutting off,
the destruction,
the disappearance of the essential being.

[3 (5)] Or some maintain
that there is nibbāna here and now.

Thus these (theories),
having been five
become three,
having been three become five.

This is the exposition of the three fives.

 


 

[1]

As to this, monks,
those recluses and brahmans
who lay down that after dying
the self, unimpaired, perceives -

these worthy recluses and brahmans
lay down that after dying
the self, perceiving and unimpaired,
has form;[15]

or these worthy recluses and brahmans
lay down that after dying
the self, perceiving and unimpaired,
has not form;

or these worthy recluses and brahmans
lay down that after dying
the self, perceiving and unimpaired,
both has and has not form;

or these worthy recluses and brahmans
lay down that after dying
the self, perceiving and unimpaired,
neither has nor has not form.

Or these worthy recluses and brahmans
lay down that after dying
the self, perceiving and unimpaired,
perceives unity;[16]

or these worthy recluses and brahmans
lay down that after dying
the self, perceiving and unimpaired,
perceives diversity;

or these worthy recluses and brahmans
lay down that after dying
the self, perceiving and unimpaired,
perceives the limited;[17]

or these worthy recluses and brahmans
lay down that after dying
the self, perceiving and unimpaired,
perceives the immeasurable.

But some of these maintain
that this consciousness-device[18]
when gone beyond
is immeasurable,
imperturbable.

"Tathāāgata" There is no distinction in the spoken word that indicates a proper noun. "Tathāāgata" can (and should) be heard both as the Buddha referring to himself and the Buddha instructing the bhikkhus as to what is to be done for one to become one who gets it ("Tathāāgata").

p.p. explains it all — p.p.

As to this, monks, the Tathāāgata comprehends
that there are those worthy recluses and brahmans
who lay down that after dying
the self, unimpaired, perceives;

and that these worthy recluses and brahmans
either lay down that after dying
the self, perceiving and unimpaired,
has form;

or these worthy recluses and brahmans
lay down that after dying
the self, perceiving and unimpaired,
has not form;

or these worthy recluses and brahmans
lay down that after dying
the self, perceiving and unimpaired,
both has and has not form;

or these worthy recluses and brahmans
lay down that after dying
the self, perceiving and unimpaired,
neither has nor has not form.

Or these worthy recluses and brahmans
lay down that after dying
the self, perceiving and unimpaired,
perceives unity;

or these worthy recluses and brahmans
lay down that after dying
the self, perceiving and unimpaired,
perceives diversity;

or these worthy recluses and brahmans
lay down that after dying
the self, perceiving and unimpaired,
perceives the limited;

or these worthy recluses and brahmans
lay down that after dying
the self, perceiving and unimpaired,
perceives the immeasurable.

Or (he comprehends) which of these (forms of) perception
is pointed out [17] as absolutely pure,
the highest,
the best,
the pre-eminent:

whether perception of fine-materiality,[19]
perception of immateriality,[20]
perception of unity
or perception of diversity.

Saying:

'There is no-thing,'[21]

some maintain that the plane of no-thing-ness
is immeasurable,
imperturbable.

Knowing that what is constructed[22]
is gross-material,[23]
but that there is this
that is the stopping of the constructions,[24]
the Tathāāgata,
seeing the escape from it,[25]
has gone beyond it.

 


 

[2]

As to this, monks,
those recluses and brahmans
who lay down that after dying
the self, unimpaired, does not perceive -

these worthy recluses and brahmans
lay down that after dying
the self, not perceiving and unimpaired,
has form;

or these worthy recluses and brahmans
lay down that after dying
the self, not perceiving and unimpaired,
has not form;

or these worthy recluses and brahmans
lay down that after dying
the self, not perceiving and unimpaired,
both has and has not form;

or these worthy recluses and brahmans
lay down that after dying
the self, not perceiving and unimpaired,
neither has nor has not form.

As to this, monks,
some revile those recluses and brahmans
who lay down that after dying
the self perceives and is unimpaired.

What is the reason for this?

They say,

'Perception is an ill,
perception is an imposthume,
perception is a barb;
this is the real,
this the excellent,
that is to say non-perception.'

As to this, monks,
the Tathāāgata comprehends
that there are those recluses and brahmans
who lay down that after dying
the self, unimpaired, does not perceive;

and that these recluses and brahmans
either lay down that after dying
the self, not perceiving and unimpaired,
has form;

or these worthy recluses and brahmans
lay down that after dying
the self, not perceiving and unimpaired,
has not form;

or these worthy recluses and brahmans
lay down that after dying
the self, not perceiving and unimpaired,
both has and has not form;

or these worthy recluses and brahmans
lay down that after dying
the self, not perceiving and unimpaired,
neither has nor has not form.

Monks, this situation does not occur
that any recluse or brahman could say:

'Apart from material shape,
apart from feeling,
apart from perception,
apart from the habitual tendencies,
apart from consciousness,
I will lay [18] down
a coming
or a going
or a deceasing
or an uprising
or expansion
or maturity.'[26]

Knowing that what is constructed
is gross-material,
but that there is this
that is the stopping of the constructions,
the Tathagata,
seeing the escape from it,
has gone beyond it.

 


 

[3]

As to this, monks,
those recluses and brahmans
who lay down that after dying
the self, unimpaired, neither perceives nor does not perceive -

these worthy recluses and brahmans
lay down that after dying
the self, neither perceiving nor not perceiving and unimpaired,
has form;

or these worthy recluses and brahmans
lay down that after dying
the self, neither perceiving nor not perceiving and unimpaired,
has not form;

or these worthy recluses and brahmans
lay down that after dying
the self, neither perceiving nor not perceiving and unimpaired,
both has and has not form;

or these worthy recluses and brahmans
lay down that after dying
the self, neither perceiving nor not perceiving and unimpaired,
neither has nor has not form.

As to this, monks,
some revile those recluses and brahmans
who lay down that after dying
the self perceives and is unimpaired,
and some also revile
those worthy recluses and brahmans
who lay down that after dying
the self, unimpaired, does not perceive.

What is the reason for this?

They say:

'Perception is an ill,
an imposthume,
a barb;
lack of perception is confusion;
this is the real,
this the excellent,
that is to say
neither-perception-nor-not-pereeption.'

As to this, monks, the Tathagata comprehends
that there are those recluses and brahmans
who lay down that after dying
the self, unimpaired,
neither perceives nor does not perceive;

and that these recluses and brahmans
lay down that after dying
the self, unimpaired,
neither perceiving nor not perceiving,
either has form;

or these worthy recluses and brahmans
lay down that after dying
the self, unimpaired,
neither perceiving nor not perceiving,
has not form;

or these worthy recluses and brahmans
lay down that after dying
the self, unimpaired,
neither perceiving nor not perceiving,
both has and has not form;

or these worthy recluses and brahmans
lay down that after dying
the self, unimpaired,
neither perceiving nor not perceiving,
neither has nor has not form.

Yet whoever are the recluses and brahmans
who lay down the acquiring of this plane
merely through the activities[27]
of what is to be seen,
heard,
experienced,
cognised -
this is shown, monks,
as destructive to acquiring that plane.

For it is not this plane, monks,
that is shown to be attainable
by attainments which have the constructions present;
this plane is shown, monks,
to be attainable
by attainments where no constructions remain.[28]

Knowing that what is constructed[29] is gross-material,
but that there is this
that is the stopping of the constructions,
the Tathāāgata,
seeing the escape from it,
has gone, beyond it.

 


 

[4]

As to this, monks,
those recluses and brahmans
who lay down the cutting off,
the destruction,
the disappearance of the essential being -
as to this, monks,
some revile those recluses and brahmans
who lay down that after dying
the self, unimpaired, perceives;
and some also [19] revile those worthy recluses and brahmans
who lay down that after dying
the self, unimpaired, does not perceive;
and some also revile those worthy recluses and brahmans
who lay down that after dying
the self, unimpaired, neither perceives nor does not perceive.

What is the reason for this?

It is that all these worthy recluses and brahmans
loftily maintain attachment[30] itself,
saying:

'We will be such hereafter,
we will be such hereafter.'[31]

It is as though a merchant
who has gone out trading
should think,

'I will have this from there,
I will get this from that' -

even so methinks
these worthy recluses and brahmans
are like the merchant
when they say,

'We will be such hereafter,
we will be such hereafter.'

As to this, monks, the Tathagata comprehends:

Those worthy recluses and brahmans
who lay down the cutting off,
the destruction,
the disappearance
of the essential being,
these,
afraid of their own body,
loathing their own body,
simply keep running
and circling round
their own body.

Just as a dog[32]
that is tied by a leash
to a strong post
or stake
keeps running
and circling round
that post
or stake,
so do these worthy recluses and brahmans,
afraid of their own body,
loathing their own body,
simply keep running
and circling round
their own body.

Knowing that what is constructed
is gross-material,
but that there is this
that is the stopping of the constructions,
the Tathāāgata,
seeing the escape from it,
has gone beyond it.

 


 

Whatever recluses and brahmans, monks,
conjecturing about the future,
speculating about the future,
in many a figure maintain assertions concerning the future,
all maintain precisely these five positions,[33] or one of them.

 

§

 

There are, monks,
some recluses and brahmans
who, conjecturing about the past,
speculating about the past,
in many a figure maintain assertions concerning the past.

[1] Some maintain,
'Eternal is self and the world,[34]
this is indeed the truth,
all else is falsehood.'

[2] Some maintain,
'Not eternal is self and the world,[35]
this is indeed the truth,
all else is falsehood.'

[3] Some maintain,
'Both eternal and not eternal is self and the world[36]
this is indeed the truth,
all else is falsehood.'

[4] Some maintain,
[20] 'Neither eternal nor not eternal is self and the world[37]
this is indeed the truth,
all else is falsehood.'

[5] Some maintain,
'Having an end is self and the world[38]
this is indeed the truth,
all else is falsehood.'

[6] Some maintain,
'Not having an end is self and the world
this is indeed the truth,
all else is falsehood.'

[7] Some maintain,
'Both having an end and not having an end is self and the world
this is indeed the truth,
all else is falsehood.'

[8] Some maintain,
'Neither having an end nor not having an end is self and the world
this is indeed the truth,
all else is falsehood.'

[9] Some maintain,
'Perceptive of unity is self and the world
this is indeed the truth,
all else is falsehood.'

[10] Some maintain,
'Perceptive of diversity is self and the world
this is indeed the truth,
all else is falsehood.'

[11] Some maintain,
'Perceptive of the limited is self and the world
this is indeed the truth,
all else is falsehood.'

[12] Some maintain,
'Perceptive of the immeasurabe is self and the world
this is indeed the truth,
all else is falsehood.'

[13] Some maintain,
'Exclusively happy is self and the world[39]
this is indeed the truth,
all else is falsehood.'

[14] Some maintain,
'Exclusively sorrowful is self and the world
this is indeed the truth,
all else is falsehood.'

[15] Some maintain,
'Happy and sorrowful is self and the world
this is indeed the truth,
all else is falsehood.'

[16] Some maintain,
'Not sorrowful nor happy is self and the world
this is indeed the truth,
all else is falsehood.'

 


 

Monks, as for those recluses and brahmans
who speak thus
and are of this view:

'Eternal is self and the world,
this is indeed the truth,
all else is falsehood' -

this situation cannot occur
that, apart from faith,
apart from inclination,
apart from tradition,
apart from consideration of reasons,
apart from reflection on
and approval of some view,
knowledge will become thoroughly pure for each one,
thoroughly cleansed.[40]

If, monks, knowledge is not thoroughly pure for each one,
not thoroughly cleansed,
even that mere fraction of knowledge
that these worthy recluses and brahmans thoroughly cleanse,
even that is pointed out as grasping
on the part of these worthy recluses and brahmans.

Knowing that what is constructed is gross-material,
but that there is this
that is the stopping of the constructions,
the Tathāāgata,
seeing the escape from it,
has gone beyond it.

 


 

Monks, as for those recluses and brahmans
who speak thus
and are of this view:

'Not eternal is self and the world,
this is indeed the truth,
all else is falsehood' -

this situation cannot occur
that, apart from faith,
apart from inclination,
apart from tradition,
apart from consideration of reasons,
apart from reflection on
and approval of some view,
knowledge will become thoroughly pure for each one,
thoroughly cleansed.

If, monks, knowledge is not thoroughly pure for each one,
not thoroughly cleansed,
even that mere fraction of knowledge
that these worthy recluses and brahmans thoroughly cleanse,
even that is pointed out as grasping
on the part of these worthy recluses and brahmans.

Knowing that what is constructed is gross-material,
but that there is this
that is the stopping of the constructions,
the Tathāāgata,
seeing the escape from it,
has gone beyond it.

 


 

Monks, as for those recluses and brahmans
who speak thus
and are of this view:

'Both eternal and not eternal,
this is indeed the truth,
all else is falsehood' -

this situation cannot occur
that, apart from faith,
apart from inclination,
apart from tradition,
apart from consideration of reasons,
apart from reflection on
and approval of some view,
knowledge will become thoroughly pure for each one,
thoroughly cleansed.

If, monks, knowledge is not thoroughly pure for each one,
not thoroughly cleansed,
even that mere fraction of knowledge
that these worthy recluses and brahmans thoroughly cleanse,
even that is pointed out as grasping
on the part of these worthy recluses and brahmans.

Knowing that what is constructed is gross-material,
but that there is this
that is the stopping of the constructions,
the Tathāāgata,
seeing the escape from it,
has gone beyond it.

 


 

Monks, as for those recluses and brahmans
who speak thus
and are of this view:

'Neither eternal nor not eternal is self and the world,
this is indeed the truth,
all else is falsehood' -

this situation cannot occur
that, apart from faith,
apart from inclination,
apart from tradition,
apart from consideration of reasons,
apart from reflection on
and approval of some view,
knowledge will become thoroughly pure for each one,
thoroughly cleansed.

If, monks, knowledge is not thoroughly pure for each one,
not thoroughly cleansed,
even that mere fraction of knowledge
that these worthy recluses and brahmans thoroughly cleanse,
even that is pointed out as grasping
on the part of these worthy recluses and brahmans.

Knowing that what is constructed is gross-material,
but that there is this
that is the stopping of the constructions,
the Tathāāgata,
seeing the escape from it,
has gone beyond it.

 


 

Monks, as for those recluses and brahmans
who speak thus
and are of this view:

'Having an end is self and the world,
this is indeed the truth,
all else is falsehood' -

this situation cannot occur
that, apart from faith,
apart from inclination,
apart from tradition,
apart from consideration of reasons,
apart from reflection on
and approval of some view,
knowledge will become thoroughly pure for each one,
thoroughly cleansed.

If, monks, knowledge is not thoroughly pure for each one,
not thoroughly cleansed,
even that mere fraction of knowledge
that these worthy recluses and brahmans thoroughly cleanse,
even that is pointed out as grasping
on the part of these worthy recluses and brahmans.

Knowing that what is constructed is gross-material,
but that there is this
that is the stopping of the constructions,
the Tathāāgata,
seeing the escape from it,
has gone beyond it.

 


 

Monks, as for those recluses and brahmans
who speak thus
and are of this view:

'Not having an end is self and the world,
this is indeed the truth,
all else is falsehood' -

this situation cannot occur
that, apart from faith,
apart from inclination,
apart from tradition,
apart from consideration of reasons,
apart from reflection on
and approval of some view,
knowledge will become thoroughly pure for each one,
thoroughly cleansed.

If, monks, knowledge is not thoroughly pure for each one,
not thoroughly cleansed,
even that mere fraction of knowledge
that these worthy recluses and brahmans thoroughly cleanse,
even that is pointed out as grasping
on the part of these worthy recluses and brahmans.

Knowing that what is constructed is gross-material,
but that there is this
that is the stopping of the constructions,
the Tathāāgata,
seeing the escape from it,
has gone beyond it.

 


 

Monks, as for those recluses and brahmans
who speak thus
and are of this view:

'Both having and not having an end is self and the world,
this is indeed the truth,
all else is falsehood' -

this situation cannot occur
that, apart from faith,
apart from inclination,
apart from tradition,
apart from consideration of reasons,
apart from reflection on
and approval of some view,
knowledge will become thoroughly pure for each one,
thoroughly cleansed.

If, monks, knowledge is not thoroughly pure for each one,
not thoroughly cleansed,
even that mere fraction of knowledge
that these worthy recluses and brahmans thoroughly cleanse,
even that is pointed out as grasping
on the part of these worthy recluses and brahmans.

Knowing that what is constructed is gross-material,
but that there is this
that is the stopping of the constructions,
the Tathāāgata,
seeing the escape from it,
has gone beyond it.

 


 

Monks, as for those recluses and brahmans
who speak thus
and are of this view:

'Neither having an end nor not having an end is self and the world,
this is indeed the truth,
all else is falsehood' -

this situation cannot occur
that, apart from faith,
apart from inclination,
apart from tradition,
apart from consideration of reasons,
apart from reflection on
and approval of some view,
knowledge will become thoroughly pure for each one,
thoroughly cleansed.

If, monks, knowledge is not thoroughly pure for each one,
not thoroughly cleansed,
even that mere fraction of knowledge
that these worthy recluses and brahmans thoroughly cleanse,
even that is pointed out as grasping
on the part of these worthy recluses and brahmans.

Knowing that what is constructed is gross-material,
but that there is this
that is the stopping of the constructions,
the Tathāāgata,
seeing the escape from it,
has gone beyond it.

 


 

Monks, as for those recluses and brahmans
who speak thus
and are of this view:

'Conscious of [21] unity is self and the world,
this is indeed the truth,
all else is falsehood' -

this situation cannot occur
that, apart from faith,
apart from inclination,
apart from tradition,
apart from consideration of reasons,
apart from reflection on
and approval of some view,
knowledge will become thoroughly pure for each one,
thoroughly cleansed.

If, monks, knowledge is not thoroughly pure for each one,
not thoroughly cleansed,
even that mere fraction of knowledge
that these worthy recluses and brahmans thoroughly cleanse,
even that is pointed out as grasping
on the part of these worthy recluses and brahmans.

Knowing that what is constructed is gross-material,
but that there is this
that is the stopping of the constructions,
the Tathāāgata,
seeing the escape from it,
has gone beyond it.

 


 

Monks, as for those recluses and brahmans
who speak thus
and are of this view:

'Conscious of diversity is self and the world,
this is indeed the truth,
all else is falsehood' -

this situation cannot occur
that, apart from faith,
apart from inclination,
apart from tradition,
apart from consideration of reasons,
apart from reflection on
and approval of some view,
knowledge will become thoroughly pure for each one,
thoroughly cleansed.

If, monks, knowledge is not thoroughly pure for each one,
not thoroughly cleansed,
even that mere fraction of knowledge
that these worthy recluses and brahmans thoroughly cleanse,
even that is pointed out as grasping
on the part of these worthy recluses and brahmans.

Knowing that what is constructed is gross-material,
but that there is this
that is the stopping of the constructions,
the Tathāāgata,
seeing the escape from it,
has gone beyond it.

 


 

Monks, as for those recluses and brahmans
who speak thus
and are of this view:

'Conscious of the limited is self and the world,
this is indeed the truth,
all else is falsehood' -

this situation cannot occur
that, apart from faith,
apart from inclination,
apart from tradition,
apart from consideration of reasons,
apart from reflection on
and approval of some view,
knowledge will become thoroughly pure for each one,
thoroughly cleansed.

If, monks, knowledge is not thoroughly pure for each one,
not thoroughly cleansed,
even that mere fraction of knowledge
that these worthy recluses and brahmans thoroughly cleanse,
even that is pointed out as grasping
on the part of these worthy recluses and brahmans.

Knowing that what is constructed is gross-material,
but that there is this
that is the stopping of the constructions,
the Tathāāgata,
seeing the escape from it,
has gone beyond it.

 


 

Monks, as for those recluses and brahmans
who speak thus
and are of this view:

'Conscious of the immeasurable is self and the world,
this is indeed the truth,
all else is falsehood' -

this situation cannot occur
that, apart from faith,
apart from inclination,
apart from tradition,
apart from consideration of reasons,
apart from reflection on
and approval of some view,
knowledge will become thoroughly pure for each one,
thoroughly cleansed.

If, monks, knowledge is not thoroughly pure for each one,
not thoroughly cleansed,
even that mere fraction of knowledge
that these worthy recluses and brahmans thoroughly cleanse,
even that is pointed out as grasping
on the part of these worthy recluses and brahmans.

Knowing that what is constructed is gross-material,
but that there is this
that is the stopping of the constructions,
the Tathāāgata,
seeing the escape from it,
has gone beyond it.

 


 

Monks, as for those recluses and brahmans
who speak thus
and are of this view:

'Exclusively happy is self and the world,
this is indeed the truth,
all else is falsehood' -

this situation cannot occur
that, apart from faith,
apart from inclination,
apart from tradition,
apart from consideration of reasons,
apart from reflection on
and approval of some view,
knowledge will become thoroughly pure for each one,
thoroughly cleansed.

If, monks, knowledge is not thoroughly pure for each one,
not thoroughly cleansed,
even that mere fraction of knowledge
that these worthy recluses and brahmans thoroughly cleanse,
even that is pointed out as grasping
on the part of these worthy recluses and brahmans.

Knowing that what is constructed is gross-material,
but that there is this
that is the stopping of the constructions,
the Tathāāgata,
seeing the escape from it,
has gone beyond it.

 


 

Monks, as for those recluses and brahmans
who speak thus
and are of this view:

'Exclusively sorrowful is self and the world,
this is indeed the truth,
all else is falsehood' -

this situation cannot occur
that, apart from faith,
apart from inclination,
apart from tradition,
apart from consideration of reasons,
apart from reflection on
and approval of some view,
knowledge will become thoroughly pure for each one,
thoroughly cleansed.

If, monks, knowledge is not thoroughly pure for each one,
not thoroughly cleansed,
even that mere fraction of knowledge
that these worthy recluses and brahmans thoroughly cleanse,
even that is pointed out as grasping
on the part of these worthy recluses and brahmans.

Knowing that what is constructed is gross-material,
but that there is this
that is the stopping of the constructions,
the Tathāāgata,
seeing the escape from it,
has gone beyond it.

 


 

Monks, as for those recluses and brahmans
who speak thus
and are of this view:

'Happy and sorrowful is self and the world,
this is indeed the truth,
all else is falsehood' -

this situation cannot occur
that, apart from faith,
apart from inclination,
apart from tradition,
apart from consideration of reasons,
apart from reflection on
and approval of some view,
knowledge will become thoroughly pure for each one,
thoroughly cleansed.

If, monks, knowledge is not thoroughly pure for each one,
not thoroughly cleansed,
even that mere fraction of knowledge
that these worthy recluses and brahmans thoroughly cleanse,
even that is pointed out as grasping
on the part of these worthy recluses and brahmans.

Knowing that what is constructed is gross-material,
but that there is this
that is the stopping of the constructions,
the Tathāāgata,
seeing the escape from it,
has gone beyond it.

 


 

Monks, as for those recluses and brahmans
who speak thus
and are of this view:

'Not sorrowful nor happy is self and the world,
this is indeed the truth,
all else is falsehood' -

this situation cannot occur
that, apart from faith,
apart from inclination,
apart from tradition,
apart from consideration of reasons,
apart from reflection on
and approval of some view,
knowledge will become thoroughly pure for each one,
thoroughly cleansed.

If, monks, knowledge is not thoroughly pure for each one,
not thoroughly cleansed,
even that mere fraction of knowledge
that these worthy recluses and brahmans thoroughly cleanse,
even that is pointed out as grasping
on the part of these worthy recluses and brahmans.

Knowing that what is constructed is gross-material,
but that there is this
that is the stopping of the constructions,
the Tathāāgata,
seeing the escape from it,
has gone beyond it.

 

§

 

In this case,[41] monks, some recluse or brahman
by casting out speculation concerning the past
and by casting out speculation concerning the future,
by not throughout fixing his mind on the fetters of the senses,
entering on the rapture of aloofness,[42]
abides therein.

He thinks,

'This is the real,
this the excellent,
that is to say,
entering on the rapture of aloofness
I am abiding therein.'

But if that rapture of aloofness of his
is stopped,[43]
from the stopping of the rapture of aloofness
sorrow arises;
from the stopping of sorrow,
the rapture of aloofness arises.

As, monks,
the heat of the sun
suffuses whatever the shade quits,
as the shade suffuses whatever the heat of the sun quits,
even so, monks,
from the stopping of the rapture of aloofness,
sorrow arises;
from the stopping of sorrow,
the rapture of aloofness arises.

As to this, monks,
the Tathāāgata comprehends:

'This worthy recluse or brahman
by casting out speculation concerning the past
and by casting out speculation concerning the future,
by not throughout fixing his mind on the fetters of the senses,
entering on the rapture of aloofness,
abides therein.

He thinks,

'This is the real,
this the excellent,
that is to say,
entering on the rapture of aloofness
I am abiding therein.'

But if that rapture of aloofness of his
is stopped,
from the stopping of the rapture of aloofness
sorrow arises;
from the stopping of sorrow,
the rapture of aloofness arises.

As, monks,
the heat of the sun
suffuses whatever the shade quits,
as the shade suffuses whatever the heat of the sun quits,
even so, monks,
from the stopping of the rapture of aloofness,
sorrow arises;
[22] from the stopping of sorrow,
the rapture of aloofness arises.

Knowing that what is constructed is gross-material,
but that there is this
that is the stopping of the constructions,
the Tathāāgata,
seeing the escape from it,
has gone beyond it.

 

§

 

But in this case, monks,
some recluse or brahman
by casting out speculation concerning the past
and by casting out speculation concerning the future,
by not throughout fixing his mind on the fetters of the senses,
by passing beyond the rapture of aloofness,
entering on spiritual happiness,[44]
abides therein.

He thinks:

'This is the real,
this the excellent,
that is to say,
entering on spiritual happiness
I am abiding therein.'

But if that spiritual happiness of his is stopped,
from the stopping of spiritual happiness
there arises the rapture of aloofness;
from the stopping of the rapture of aloofness
spritual happiness arises.

As, monks,
the heat of the sun
suffuses whatever the shade quits,
as the shade suffuses whatever the heat of the sun quits,
even so, monks,
from the stopping of spiritual happiness
there arises the rapture of aloofness;
from the stopping of the rapture of aloofness
spiritual happiness arises.

As to this, monks,
the Tathāāgata comprehends:

'This worthy recluse or brahman,by casting out speculation concerning the past
and by casting out speculation concerning the future,
by not throughout fixing his mind on the fetters of the senses,
by passing beyond the rapture of aloofness,
entering on spiritual happiness,
abides therein.

He thinks:

'This is the real,
this the excellent,
that is to say,
entering on spiritual happiness
I am abiding therein.'

But if that spiritual happiness of his is stopped,
from the stopping of spiritual happiness
there arises the rapture of aloofness;
from the stopping of the rapture of aloofness
spritual happiness arises.

As, monks,
the heat of the sun
suffuses whatever the shade quits,
as the shade suffuses whatever the heat of the sun quits,
even so, monks,
from the stopping of spiritual happiness
there arises the rapture of aloofness;
from the stopping of the rapture of aloofness
spiritual happiness arises.

Knowing that what is constructed is gross-material,
but that there is this
that is the stopping of the constructions,
the Tathāāgata,
seeing the escape from it,
has gone beyond it.

 

§

 

In this case, monks,
some recluse or brahman
by casting out speculation concerning the past
and by casting out speculation concerning the future,
by not fixing his mind throughout on the fetters of the senses,
by passing beyond the rapture of aloofness,
by passing beyond spiritual happiness,
entering on feeling that is neither painful nor pleasant,[45] abides therein.

He thinks:

'This is the real,
this the excellent,
that is to say,
entering on feeling that is neither painful nor pleasant
I am abiding therein.'

But if that feeling of his
that is neither painful nor pleasant is stopped,
from the stopping of the feeling that is neither painful nor pleasant
there arises spiritual happiness;
from the stopping of spiritual happiness
there arises a feeling that is neither painful nor pleasant.

As, [23] monks,
the heat of the sun
suffuses whatever the shade quits,
as the shade suffuses whatever the heat of the sun quits,
even so, monks,
from the stopping of feeling that is neither painful nor pleasant
there arises spiritual happiness;
from the stopping of spiritual happiness
feeling that is neither painful nor pleasant arises.

As to this, monks, the Tathāāgata comprehends:

This worthy recluse or brahman
by casting out speculation concerning the past
and by casting out speculation concerning the future,
by not fixing his mind throughout on the fetters of the senses,
by passing beyond the rapture of aloofness,
by passing beyond spiritual happiness,
entering on feeling that is neither painful nor pleasant,
abides therein.

He thinks:

'This is the real,
this the excellent,
that is to say,
entering on feeling that is neither painful nor pleasant
I am abiding therein.'

But if that feeling of his
that is neither painful nor pleasant is stopped,
from the stopping of the feeling that is neither painful nor pleasant
there arises spiritual happiness;
from the stopping of spiritual happiness
there arises a feeling that is neither painful nor pleasant.

As, the heat of the sun
suffuses whatever the shade quits,
as the shade suffuses whatever the heat of the sun quits,
even so, monks,
from the stopping of feeling that is neither painful nor pleasant
there arises spiritual happiness;
from the stopping of spiritual happiness
feeling that is neither painful nor pleasant arises.

Knowing that what is constructed is gross-material,
but that there is this
that is the stopping of the constructions,
the Tathāāgata,
seeing the escape from it,
has gone beyond it.

 

§

 

But in this case, monks,
some recluse or brahman,
by casting out speculation concerning the past
and by casting out speculation concerning the future,
by not throughout fixing his mind on the fetters of the senses,
by passing beyond the rapture of aloofness,
by passing beyond spiritual happiness,
by passing beyond feeling that is neither painful nor pleasant,
beholds,

'Tranquil am I,
allayed am I,
without grasping am I.'

As to this, monks, the Tathāāgata comprehends:

This worthy recluse or brahman,
by casting out speculation concerning the past
and by casting out speculation concerning the future,
by not throughout fixing his mind on the fetters of the senses,
by passing beyond the rapture of aloofness,
by passing beyond spiritual happiness,
by passing beyond feeling that is neither painful nor pleasant,
beholds,

'Tranquil am I,
allayed am I,
without grasping am I.' —

certainly this venerable one
maintains the very course
that is suitable for nibbāna.[46]

On the other hand,
that worthy recluse or brahman,
grasping,
either grasps after speculation concerning the past[47]
or, grasping,
grasps after speculation concerning the future[48]
or, grasping,
grasps after a fetter of the senses
or, grasping,
grasps after the rapture of aloofness
or, grasping,
grasps after spiritual happiness
or, grasping,
grasps after feeling that is neither painful nor pleasant.

And inasmuch as this venerable one beholds,

'Tranquil am I,
allayed am I,
without grasping am I,'

this too is shown as a grasping
on the part of that [24] worthy recluse or brahman.

Knowing that what is constructed is gross-material,
but that there is this
that is the stopping of the constructions,
the Tathāāgata,
seeing the escape from it,
has gone beyond it.

 

§

 

But now, monks,
this incomparable matchless path to peace[49]
was awakened to by the Tathāāgata,
that is to say,
having known the arising
and the setting
and the satisfaction
and the peril
of the six fields of sensory impingement
and the escape as it really is,
there is deliverance
without grasping.[50]

And as, monks,
this incomparable matchless path to peace
was awakened to by the Tathāāgata,
that is to say,
having known the arising
and the setting
and the satisfaction
and the peril
of the six fields of sensory impingement
and the escape as it really is,
there is deliverance without grasping."

Thus spoke the Lord.

Delighted, these monks rejoiced in what the Lord had said.

Discourse on the Threefold Five:
The Second

 


[1] This Discourse, an exposition of heretical views, should be read in conjunction with the Brahmajāla-Suttanta (to which the Comy. refers) and also with the Mahānidāna-Suttanta Ī23 et seq. (D. Stas. Nos. 1 and 15.)

[2] MA. iv. 5: recluses because they have gone forth, brahmans by birth; or, they are called "recluses" and "brahmans" by the world. So samaṇa-brāhmaṇā should be translated either "recluses and brahmans" or "brahman recluses." But since the phrase samaṇo vā brāhmaṇo vā is found later in the Sta., I have chosen the former rendering.

[3] aparantakappika, or, "supposing there is a future." On the two kappas of craving, taṇhā, and views, diṭṭhi, see Nd. I. 112-113. The former is associated with thoughts of "mine," the latter with false views about one's own body (see below, p. 19), other false views and with taking up extreme views. Cf. D. i. 30 f.

[4] As at D. i. 30, which adds "on forty-four grounds."

[5] In sixteen ways, MA. iv. 16. For these see D. i. 31.

[6] aroga, not ill, hale, healthy; but MA. iv. 16, DA. 119 give nicca, enduring, permanent. Rhys Davids, at Dial. i. 44 ff., translated as "not subject to decay."

[7] saññin, is perceptive, perceiving. I keep to this rather than to "consciousness" which Rhys Davids uses, because I use "perception" for saññā (as one of the khandha) and "consciousness" for viññāṇa (also a khandha, etc.).

[8] In eight ways, MA. iv. 16. For these see D. i. 32.

[9] Also in eight ways, MA. iv. 16. For these see D. i. 33.

[10] On seven grounds, see D. i. 34-35. Brhad. Up. II. 4. 12-14 states the problem of consciousness, vijñāna, and the lack of it, in a clear manner. Cf. also Kaṭha Up. I. 1. 20: "there is doubt about a man who has 'departed,' prete, some saying he is and others that he is not," and see Radhakrishnan, The Principal Upanishads, p. 603.

[11] As at D. i. 34; on seven grounds. MA. iv. 16, DA. 120 say that these three terms are synonymous, but they gloss vināsa by adassana and vibhava by bhavavigama.

[12] As at M. i. 140, where this thesis was wrongly ascribed to Gotama.

[13] On five grounds. See D. i. 36. MA. iv. 17, DA. 121 say that this is the allaying of anguish in this very existence.

[14] santaṁ, i.e. in reference to the three modes of consciousness.

[15] See D. i. 31.

[16] See D. i. 31. MA. iv. 18, DA. 119 appear to refer this to the samāpatti, the nine meditative attainments, while "diversity" or multiformity is incomplete attainment.

[17] DA. 119 refers "limited," the small, paritta, and "the immeasurable" to the kasiṇa-devices.

[18] viññāṇakasiṇa. See M. ii. 14-15, A. v. 60, where each of the ten "devices" is to be understood in five ways, the fifth way being as "immeasurable."

[19] This refers to the fourth jhānu. Cf. Expos. i. 210 ff.

[20] This refers to the planes of infinite ākāsa and infinite consciousness, MA. iv. 18. Cf. Expos. i. 269 ff.

[21] At A. v. 63, according to the perception of some beings this is the topmost perception.

[22] MA. iv. 19 says that all this - perception together with views - is constructed and formed by the coming together of conditions, paccaya.

[23] oḷārika, material, gross, coarse.

[24] saṁkhārā, or activities. This is nibbāna, according to MA. iv. 19. At S. iv. 217 the stopping of the saṁkhārā, is spoken of as gradual. See M.L.S. i. Intr., p. xxiv.

[25] I.e. from the compounded. On the stopping of whatever is the compounded being the escape from it, see D. iii. 275, Iti. p. 61, and cf. Iti. p. 37, Ud. 80.

[26] A statement ascribed at MA. iv. 20 to sophists, vitaṇḍavādī.

[27] saṁkhāramattena, referring to oḷārika, the gross or material saṁkhārā, MA. iv. 20. "This plane" is of course that of neither-perception-nor-not-perception.

[28] This plane is subtle, sukhuma.

[29] saŋkhata.

[30] āsatti, sticking to, craving.

[31] A noble warrior or a brahman, MA. iv, 21.

[32] Cf. S. iii. 150.

[33] āyatana, here glossed at MA. iv. 22 by kāraṇāni. Now, after having spoken of the 44 assertions concerning the future, the 18 concerning the past will be spoken of (beginning with the next paragraph).

[34] Cf. D. i. 13, 43; the views of the Eternalists.

[35] The views of the Annihilationists.

[36] The views of the partial-eternalists, see D. i. 17.

[37] The views of the "eel-wrigglers," see D. i. 24-27, Pṭs i. 155.

[38] See D. i. 31.

[39] Cf. M. ii. 35 f.

[40] Cf. S. ii. 115 where the monk Musīla knew, apart from faith, etc., that "the stopping of becoming is nibbana," and was classed among the arahants.

[41] MA. iv. 25 says that up to here the 62 views have been handed down in the Brahmajāla: the four eternalist views, the four partial-eternalist, the four about "end" and "no end," the four eel-wrigglings, the two concerned with "attainment," the sixteen views on the "perceiving" person, the eight on the non-perceiving person, the eight on the person who neither perceives nor does not perceive, the seven annihilationist views, and the five views of nibbāna here and now. But in this Discourse (i.e. M. Sta. 102) views of "own body" are also spoken of (see above, p. 19).

[42] pavivekaṁ pītiṁ. The rapture, pīti, of the first two jhāna in which it is an element.

[43] With the stopping of these two jhāna.

nirāmisa. Nir = put down or cast out; āmisa = raw meat: not carnal.

p.p. explains it all — p.p.

[44] I.e. the third jhāna. The word nirāmisa, as the opposite of the "physical," is hard to translate here. In some contexts "ghostly" is not too far away from the meaning. Chalmers gives "bliss immaterial"; but I have used "immaterial" for arūpa.

[45] The fourth jhāna.

[46] Cf. S. iv. 133.

[47] Eighteen views.

[48] Forty-four views which, with the above eighteen, together constitute the sixty-two heretical views.

[49] Cf. M. i. 163.

[50] Cf. A. v. 64; also D. i. 17. Anupāda is "without clinging" or grasping, and therefore without further "fuel" for saṁsāra. MA. iv. 28 says that this elsewhere is nibbāna, but here it is the attainment of the fruit of arahantship.


Contact:
E-mail
Copyright Statement   Webmaster's Page