Majjhima Nikaya


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Majjhima Nikāya
III. Upari Paṇṇāsa
4. Vibhaŋga Vagga

The Middle Length Sayings
III. The Final Fifty Discourses
4. The Division on Analysis

Sutta 133

Mahā Kaccāna-Bhadd'Eka-Ratta Suttaɱ

Mahā Kaccāna's Discourse on the Auspicious

Translated from the Pali by I.B. Horner, M.A.
Associate of Newham College, Cambridge
First Published in 1954

Copyright The Pali Text Society
Commercial Rights Reserved
Creative Commons Licence
For details see Terms of Use.

 


 

[1][chlm][upal] THUS HAVE I HEARD:

At one time the Lord was staying near Rājagaha
in the Tapoda monastery.[1]

Then the venerable Samiddhi,[2]
getting up when the night was waning,
went to the Tapoda (lake)
to bathe his limbs.

When he had bathed his limbs in the Tapoda (lake)
and had come out (of the water),
he stood in one robe
drying his limbs.

Then, when the night was far spent,[3]
a certain deva
illumining with his radiant beauty
the whole of the Tapoda,[4]
approached the venerable Samiddhi
and, having approached,
stood at one side.

While he was standing at one side,
this deva spoke thus to the venerable Samiddhi:

[238] "Do you, monk, remember
the exposition
and the analysis
of the Auspicious?"

"I, friend,[5] do not remember
the exposition
and the analysis
of the Auspicious.

But do you, friend, remember
the exposition
and the analysis
of the Auspicious?"

"I too, monk, do not remember
either the exposition
or the analysis
of the Auspicious.

But do you, monk, remember
the verses of the Auspicious?"

"I, friend, do not remember
the verses of the Auspicious.

But do you, friend, remember
the verses of the Auspicious?"

"I too, monk, do not remember
the verses of the Auspicious.

But do you, monk, learn
the exposition
and the analysis
of the Auspicious;
do you, monk, master
the exposition
and the analysis
of the Auspicious;
do you, monk, remember
the exposition
and the analysis
of the Auspicious.

For the exposition
and the analysis
of the Auspicious, monk,
are connected with the goal,
they are fundamental to the Brahma-faring."

Thus spoke this deva;
having said this,
he disappeared then and there.

Then the venerable Samiddhi
towards the end of that night
approached the Lord;
having approached and greeted the Lord,
he sat down at a respectful distance.

As he was sitting down at a respectful distance,
the venerable Samiddhi
spoke thus to the Lord:

"Now I, revered sir,
when the night was waning
went to the Tapoda (lake)
to bathe my limbs.

When I had bathed my limbs
in the Tapoda (lake)
and had come out (of the water),
I stood in one robe
while drying my limbs.

Then, revered sir, when the night was far spent
a certain deva
illumining with his radiant beauty
the whole of the Tapoda,
approached me
and, having approached,
stood at one side.

While he was standing at one side,
this deva spoke thus to me:

"Do you, monk, remember
the exposition
and the analysis
of the Auspicious?"

"I, friend, do not remember
the exposition
and the analysis
of the Auspicious.

But do you, friend, remember
the exposition
and the analysis
of the Auspicious?"

"I too, monk, do not remember
either the exposition
or the analysis
of the Auspicious.

But do you, monk, remember
the verses of the Auspicious?"

"I, friend, do not remember
the verses of the Auspicious.

But do you, friend, remember
the verses of the Auspicious?"

"I too, monk, do not remember
the verses of the Auspicious.

But do you, monk, learn
the exposition
and the analysis
of the Auspicious;
do you, monk, master
the exposition
and the analysis
of the Auspicious;
do you, monk, remember
the exposition
and the analysis
of the Auspicious.

For the exposition
and the analysis
of the Auspicious, monk,
are connected with the goal,
they are fundamental to the Brahma-faring."

Thus spoke this deva;
having said this,
he disappeared then and there.

It were good, revered sir,
if the Lord would teach me
the exposition
and the analysis
of the Auspicious."

"Well then, monk, listen
and attend carefully
and I will speak."

"Yes, revered sir,"
the venerable Samiddhi answered the Lord in assent.

The Lord spoke thus:

"The past should not be followed after, the future not desired.
What is past is got rid of and the future has not come.
But whoever has eye now here, now there, of a present thing,
Knowing that it is immovable, unshakable, let him cultivate it.
Swelter at the task this very day. Who knows whether he will die tomorrow?
There is no bargaining with the great hosts of Death.
Thus abiding ardently, unwearied day and night,
He indeed is 'Auspicious' called, described as a sage at peace."

Thus spoke the Lord.

When he had said this,[6]
the Well-farer rose [239] from his seat
and entered a dwelling-place.

Soon after the Lord had gone,
it occurred to those monks:

"Your reverences, the Lord,
having recited this exposition to us in brief,
but not having explained the meaning in full,
rose from his seat
and entered a dwelling-place:

"The past should not be followed after, the future not desired.
What is past is got rid of and the future has not come.
But whoever has eye now here, now there, of a present thing,
Knowing that it is immovable, unshakable, let him cultivate it.
Swelter at the task this very day. Who knows whether he will die tomorrow?
There is no bargaining with the great hosts of Death.
Thus abiding ardently, unwearied day and night,
He indeed is 'Auspicious' called, described as a sage at peace."

Now, who can explain the meaning in full
of this exposition that was recited in brief by the Lord
but the meaning of which was not explained in full?"

Then it occurred to these monks:

"Now the venerable Kaccāna the Great
is both praised by the Teacher
and revered by intelligent fellow-Brahma-farers;
and the venerable Kaccāna the Great
is able to explain in full
the meaning of this exposition
that was recited in brief by the Lord
but the meaning of which was not explained in full.

Suppose we were to approach the venerable Kaccāna the Great,
and having approached,
were to question him on this meaning?"

Then these monks approached the venerable Kaccāna the Great;
having approached,
they exchanged greetings with him,
and when they had conversed in a friendly and courteous way,
they sat down at a respectful distance.

As they were sitting down at a respectful distance,
these monks spoke thus to the venerable Kaccāna the Great:

"Reverend Kaccāna,
the Lord, having recited this exposition to us in brief
but not having explained its meaning in full,
rose from his seat and entered a dwelling-place:

"The past should not be followed after, the future not desired.
What is past is got rid of and the future has not come.
But whoever has eye now here, now there, of a present thing,
Knowing that it is immovable, unshakable, let him cultivate it.
Swelter at the task this very day. Who knows whether he will die tomorrow?
There is no bargaining with the great hosts of Death.
Thus abiding ardently, unwearied day and night,
He indeed is 'Auspicious' called, described as a sage at peace."

Soon after the Lord had departed,
it occurred to us,
reverend Kaccāna:

"Your reverences, the Lord,
having recited this exposition to us in brief,
but not having explained the meaning in full,
rose from his seat
and entered a dwelling-place:

"The past should not be followed after, the future not desired.
What is past is got rid of and the future has not come.
But whoever has eye now here, now there, of a present thing,
Knowing that it is immovable, unshakable, let him cultivate it.
Swelter at the task this very day. Who knows whether he will die tomorrow?
There is no bargaining with the great hosts of Death.
Thus abiding ardently, unwearied day and night,
He indeed is 'Auspicious' called, described as a sage at peace."

Now, who can explain the meaning in full
of this exposition that was recited in brief by the Lord
but the meaning of which was not ex- [240] plained in full?"

Then it occurred to us:

"Now the venerable Kaccāna the Great
is both praised by the Teacher
and revered by intelligent fellow-Brahma-farers;
and the venerable Kaccāna the Great
is able to explain in full
the meaning of this exposition
that was recited in brief by the Lord
but the meaning of which was not explained in full.

Suppose we were to approach the venerable Kaccāna the Great,
and having approached,
were to question him on this meaning?"

May the venerable Kaccāna the Great explain it."

"Your reverences,
as a man walking about aiming at the pith,
searching for the pith,
looking about for the pith
of a great,
stable
and pithy tree,
might pass by the root,
pass by the trunk,
thinking that the pith
was to be looked for
in the branches and foliage -
even so is this performance of the venerable ones,
for (although) you had the Teacher face to face,
yet you have ignored that Lord
and judge that it is I
who should be questioned on this meaning.

But, your reverences,
the Lord knows what should be known,
sees what should be seen,
he has become eye,
become knowledge,
become dhamma,
become Brahma,
he is the propounder,
the expounder,
the bringer of the goal,
the giver of the Deathless,
dhamma-lord,
Tathāāgata.

This was the time
when you should have questioned the Lord on this meaning
so that you might have understood
what the Lord explained to you."

"Undoubtedly, reverend Kaccāna,
the Lord knows what should be known,
sees what should be seen,
he has become eye,
become knowledge,
become dhamma,
become Brahma,
he is the propounder,
the expounder,
the bringer of the goal,
the giver of the Deathless,
dhamma-lord,
Tathāāgata.

This was the time
when we should have questioned the Lord on this meaning
so that we might have understood
what the Lord explained to us.

But the venerable Kaccāna the Great
is both praised by the Teacher
and revered by intelligent fellow Brahma-farers;
and the venerable Kaccāna the Great is able to explain in full
the meaning of this exposition that was recited in brief by the Lord
but the meaning of which was not explained in full.

May the venerable Kaccana explain it,
without finding it troublesome."

"Well then, your reverences,
listen,
pay careful attention
and I will speak."

"Yes, your reverence,"
these monks answered the venerable Kaccāna the Great in assent.

The venerable Kaccāna the Great spoke thus:

"In regard to that exposition, your reverences,
that the Lord recited in brief
but the meaning of which he had not explained in full
when he rose from his seat
and entered a dwelling-place:

"The past should not be followed after, the future not desired.
What is past is got rid of and the future has not come.
But whoever has eye now here, now there, of a present thing,
Knowing that it is immovable, unshakable, let him cultivate it.
Swelter at the task this very day. Who knows whether he will die tomorrow?
There is no bargaining with the great hosts of Death.
Thus abiding ardently, unwearied day and night,
He indeed is 'Auspicious' called, described as a sage at peace."

Of this exposition that was recited by the Lord in brief
but the [241] meaning of which
he did not explain in full,
I, your reverences, understand the meaning in full thus:

And how, your reverences, does one follow after the past?

He thinks:

'Such was my eye[7][ed1] in the distant past,
such were material shapes,'
and his consciousness[8] is bound fast there
by desire and attachment;
because his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he delights in it;[9]
delighting in it
he follows after the past.

He thinks:

'Such was my ear in the distant past,
such were sounds,'
and his consciousness is bound fast there
by desire and attachment;
because his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he delights in it;
delighting in it
he follows after the past.

He thinks:

'Such was my nose in the distant past,
such were smells,'
and his consciousness is bound fast there
by desire and attachment;
because his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he delights in it;
delighting in it
he follows after the past.

He thinks:

'Such was my tongue in the distant past,
such were flavours,'
and his consciousness is bound fast there
by desire and attachment;
because his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he delights in it;
delighting in it
he follows after the past.

He thinks:

'Such was my body in the distant past,
such were tactile objects,'
and his consciousness is bound fast there
by desire and attachment;
because his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he delights in it;
delighting in it
he follows after the past.

He thinks:

'Such was my mind in the distant past,
such were mental states,'
and his consciousness is bound fast there
by desire and attachment;
because his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he delights in it;
delighting in it
he follows after the past.

It is thus, your reverences,
that one follows after the past.

 


 

And how, your reverences,
does one not follow after the past?

He thinks:

'Such was my eye in the distant past,
such were material shapes,'
but without his consciousness being bound fast there
by desire and attachment;
because his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he does not delight in it;
not delighting in it
he does not follow after the past.

He thinks:

'Such was my ear in the distant past,
such were sounds,'
but without his consciousness being bound fast there
by desire and attachment;
because his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he does not delight in it;
not delighting in it
he does not follow after the past.

He thinks:

'Such was my nose in the distant past,
such were smells,'
but without his consciousness being bound fast there
by desire and attachment;
because his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he does not delight in it;
not delighting in it
he does not follow after the past.

He thinks:

'Such was my tongue in the distant past,
such were flavours,'
but without his consciousness being bound fast there
by desire and attachment;
because his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he does not delight in it;
not delighting in it
he does not follow after the past.

He thinks:

'Such was my body in the distant past,
such were tactile objects,'
but without his consciousness being bound fast there
by desire and attachment;
because his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he does not delight in it;
not delighting in it
he does not follow after the past.

He thinks:

'Such was my mind in the distant past,
such were mental states,'
but without his consciousness being bound fast there
by desire and attachment;
because his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he does not delight in it;
not delighting in it
he does not follow after the past.

It is thus, your reverences,
that one does not follow after the past.

 


 

And how, your reverences,
does one desire the future?

He thinks:

'May my eye be such
in the distant future,
material [242] shapes such'
and bends his thought
to the acquisition of what is not (yet) acquired;
because he so bends his thought,
he delights in that;
delighting in that,
he desires the future.

He thinks:

'May my ear be such
in the distant future,
sounds such'
and bends his thought
to the acquisition of what is not (yet) acquired;
because he so bends his thought,
he delights in that;
delighting in that,
he desires the future.

He thinks:

'May my nose be such
in the distant future,
smells such'
and bends his thought
to the acquisition of what is not (yet) acquired;
because he so bends his thought,
he delights in that;
delighting in that,
he desires the future.

He thinks:

'May my tongue be such
in the distant future,
flavours such'
and bends his thought
to the acquisition of what is not (yet) acquired;
because he so bends his thought,
he delights in that;
delighting in that,
he desires the future.

He thinks:

'May my body be such
in the distant future,
tactile objects such'
and bends his thought
to the acquisition of what is not (yet) acquired;
because he so bends his thought,
he delights in that;
delighting in that,
he desires the future.

He thinks:

'May my mind be such
in the distant future,
mental objects such'
and bends his thought
to the acquisition of what is not (yet) acquired;
because he so bends his thought,
he delights in that;
delighting in that,
he desires the future.

It is thus, your reverences,
that one desires the future.

 


 

And how, your reverences,
does one not desire the future?

He thinks:

'May my eye be such
in the distant future,
maerial shapes such'
but does not bend his thought
to the acquisition of what is not (yet) acquired;
because he does not so bend his thought,
he does not delight in that;
not delighting in that,
he does not desire the future.

He thinks:

'May my ear be such
in the distant future,
sounds such'
but does not bend his thought
to the acquisition of what is not (yet) acquired;
because he does not so bend his thought,
he does not delight in that;
not delighting in that,
he does not desire the future.

He thinks:

'May my nose be such
in the distant future,
smells such'
but does not bend his thought
to the acquisition of what is not (yet) acquired;
because he does not so bend his thought,
he does not delight in that;
not delighting in that,
he does not desire the future.

He thinks:

'May my tongue be such
in the distant future,
flavours such'
but does not bend his thought
to the acquisition of what is not (yet) acquired;
because he does not so bend his thought,
he does not delight in that;
not delighting in that,
he does not desire the future.

He thinks:

'May my body be such
in the distant future,
tactile objects such'
but does not bend his thought
to the acquisition of what is not (yet) acquired;
because he does not so bend his thought,
he does not delight in that;
not delighting in that,
he does not desire the future.

He thinks:

'May my mind be such
in the distant future,
mental states such'
but does not bend his thought
to the acquisition of what is not (yet) acquired;
because he does not so bend his thought,
he does not delight in that;
not delighting in that,
he does not desire the future.

It is thus, your reverences,
that one does not desire the future.

 


 

And how, your reverences,
is one drawn away among present things?

If, your reverences,
there are at this present time[10]
both eye and material shapes[11]
to which his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment
at this same present time,[12] (then)
because his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he delights in them;[13]
delighting in them,
he is drawn away among present things.

If, your reverences,
there are at this present time
both ear and sounds
to which his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment
at this same present time, (then)
because his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he delights in them;
delighting in them,
he is drawn away among present things.

If, your reverences,
there are at this present time
both nose and smells
to which his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment
at this same present time, (then)
because his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he delights in them;
delighting in them,
he is drawn away among present things.

If, your reverences,
there are at this present time
both tongue and flavours
to which his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment
at this same present time, (then)
because his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he delights in them;
delighting in them,
he is drawn away among present things.

If, your reverences,
there are at this present time
both body and tactile objects
to which his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment
at this same present time, (then)
because his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he delights in them;
delighting in them,
he is drawn away among present things.

If, your reverences,
there are at this present time
both mind and mental states
to which his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment
at this same present time, (then)
because his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he delights in them;
delighting in them,
he is drawn away among present things.

It is thus, your reverences,
that one is drawn away among present things.

 


 

[243] And how, your reverences, is one not drawn away among present things?

If, your reverences,
there are at this present time
both eye and material shapes
to which his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment
at this same present time, (then)
because his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he does not delight in them;
not delighting in them,
he is not drawn away among present things.

If, your reverences,
there are at this present time
both ear and sounds
to which his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment
at this same present time, (then)
because his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he does not delight in them;
not delighting in them,
he is not drawn away among present things.

If, your reverences,
there are at this present time
both nose and smells
to which his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment
at this same present time, (then)
because his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he does not delight in them;
not delighting in them,
he is not drawn away among present things.

If, your reverences,
there are at this present time
both tongue and flavours
to which his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment
at this same present time, (then)
because his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he does not delight in them;
not delighting in them,
he is not drawn away among present things.

If, your reverences,
there are at this present time
both body and tactile objects
to which his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment
at this same present time, (then)
because his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he does not delight in them;
not delighting in them,
he is not drawn away among present things.

If, your reverences,
there are at this present time
both mind and mental states[14]
to which his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment
at this same present time, (then)
because his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he does not delight in them;
not delighting in them,
he is not drawn away among present things.

It is thus, your reverences,
that one is not drawn away among present things.

In regard to that exposition, your reverences,
that the Lord recited in brief
but the meaning of which he had not explained in full
when he rose from his seat
and entered a dwelling-place:

"The past should not be followed after, the future not desired.
What is past is got rid of and the future has not come.
But whoever has eye now here, now there, of a present thing,
Knowing that it is immovable, unshakable, let him cultivate it.
Swelter at the task this very day. Who knows whether he will die tomorrow?
There is no bargaining with the great hosts of Death.
Thus abiding ardently, unwearied day and night,
He indeed is 'Auspicious' called, described as a sage at peace."

Of this exposition
that was recited by the Lord in brief
but the meaning of which he did not explain in full,
I, your reverences, understand the meaning in full thus.

But if you, venerable ones, so desire,
having approached the Lord,
you can question him as to the meaning,
so that as the Lord explains it to you
so you may understand it."

Then these monks,
delighting and rejoicing in what the venerable Kaccāna the Great had said,
rising from their seats,
approached the Lord;
having approached and greeted the Lord,
they sat down at a respectful distance.

As they were sitting down at a respectful distance,
these monks spoke thus to the Lord:

"Revered sir, the Lord,
having recited this exposition to us in brief,
rose from his seat
and entered a dwelling-place
before he had explained the meaning in full:

"The past should not be followed after, the future not desired.
What is past is got rid of and the future has not come.
But whoever has eye now here, now there, of a present thing,
Knowing that it is immovable, unshakable, let him cultivate it.
Swelter at the task this very day. Who knows whether he will die tomorrow?
There is no bargaining with the great hosts of Death.
Thus abiding ardently, unwearied day and night,
He indeed is 'Auspicious' called, described as a sage at peace."

[244] And, revered sir,
not long after the Lord had departed, it occurred to us:

"Your reverences, the Lord,
having recited this exposition to us in brief,
but not having explained the meaning in full,
rose from his seat
and entered a dwelling-place:

"The past should not be followed after, the future not desired.
What is past is got rid of and the future has not come.
But whoever has eye now here, now there, of a present thing,
Knowing that it is immovable, unshakable, let him cultivate it.
Swelter at the task this very day. Who knows whether he will die tomorrow?
There is no bargaining with the great hosts of Death.
Thus abiding ardently, unwearied day and night,
He indeed is 'Auspicious' called, described as a sage at peace."

Now, who can explain the meaning in full
of this exposition that was recited in brief by the Lord
but the meaning of which was not explained in full?"

Then it occurred to us:

"Now the venerable Kaccāna the Great
is both praised by the Teacher
and revered by intelligent fellow-Brahma-farers;
and the venerable Kaccāna the Great
is able to explain in full
the meaning of this exposition
that was recited in brief by the Lord
but the meaning of which was not explained in full.

Suppose we were to approach the venerable Kaccāna the Great,
and having approached,
were to question him on this meaning?"

Then we, revered sir,
approached the venerable Kaccāna the Great,
and having approached
we questioned the venerable Kaccāna the Great on this meaning.

The meaning of these (words), revered sir,
was explained to us by the venerable Kaccāna the Great
by these methods,
by these sentences,
by these words:"[ed2]

"In regard to that exposition, your reverences,
that the Lord recited in brief
but the meaning of which he had not explained in full
when he rose from his seat
and entered a dwelling-place:

"The past should not be followed after, the future not desired.
What is past is got rid of and the future has not come.
But whoever has eye now here, now there, of a present thing,
Knowing that it is immovable, unshakable, let him cultivate it.
Swelter at the task this very day. Who knows whether he will die tomorrow?
There is no bargaining with the great hosts of Death.
Thus abiding ardently, unwearied day and night,
He indeed is 'Auspicious' called, described as a sage at peace."

Of this exposition that was recited by the Lord in brief
but the meaning of which
he did not explain in full,
I, your reverences, understand the meaning in full thus:

And how, your reverences, does one follow after the past?

He thinks:

'Such was my eye in the distant past,
such were material shapes,'
and his consciousness is bound fast there
by desire and attachment;
because his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he delights in it;
delighting in it
he follows after the past.

He thinks:

'Such was my ear in the distant past,
such were sounds,'
and his consciousness is bound fast there
by desire and attachment;
because his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he delights in it;
delighting in it
he follows after the past.

He thinks:

'Such was my nose in the distant past,
such were smells,'
and his consciousness is bound fast there
by desire and attachment;
because his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he delights in it;
delighting in it
he follows after the past.

He thinks:

'Such was my tongue in the distant past,
such were flavours,'
and his consciousness is bound fast there
by desire and attachment;
because his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he delights in it;
delighting in it
he follows after the past.

He thinks:

'Such was my body in the distant past,
such were tactile objects,'
and his consciousness is bound fast there
by desire and attachment;
because his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he delights in it;
delighting in it
he follows after the past.

He thinks:

'Such was my mind in the distant past,
such were mental states,'
and his consciousness is bound fast there
by desire and attachment;
because his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he delights in it;
delighting in it
he follows after the past.

It is thus, your reverences,
that one follows after the past.

 


 

And how, your reverences,
does one not follow after the past?

He thinks:

'Such was my eye in the distant past,
such were material shapes,'
but without his consciousness being bound fast there
by desire and attachment;
because his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he does not delight in it;
not delighting in it
he does not follow after the past.

He thinks:

'Such was my ear in the distant past,
such were sounds,'
but without his consciousness being bound fast there
by desire and attachment;
because his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he does not delight in it;
not delighting in it
he does not follow after the past.

He thinks:

'Such was my nose in the distant past,
such were smells,'
but without his consciousness being bound fast there
by desire and attachment;
because his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he does not delight in it;
not delighting in it
he does not follow after the past.

He thinks:

'Such was my tongue in the distant past,
such were flavours,'
but without his consciousness being bound fast there
by desire and attachment;
because his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he does not delight in it;
not delighting in it
he does not follow after the past.

He thinks:

'Such was my body in the distant past,
such were tactile objects,'
but without his consciousness being bound fast there
by desire and attachment;
because his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he does not delight in it;
not delighting in it
he does not follow after the past.

He thinks:

'Such was my mind in the distant past,
such were mental states,'
but without his consciousness being bound fast there
by desire and attachment;
because his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he does not delight in it;
not delighting in it
he does not follow after the past.

It is thus, your reverences,
that one does not follow after the past.

 


 

And how, your reverences,
does one desire the future?

He thinks:

'May my eye be such
in the distant future,
material shapes such'
and bends his thought
to the acquisition of what is not (yet) acquired;
because he so bends his thought,
he delights in that;
delighting in that,
he desires the future.

He thinks:

'May my ear be such
in the distant future,
sounds such'
and bends his thought
to the acquisition of what is not (yet) acquired;
because he so bends his thought,
he delights in that;
delighting in that,
he desires the future.

He thinks:

'May my nose be such
in the distant future,
smells such'
and bends his thought
to the acquisition of what is not (yet) acquired;
because he so bends his thought,
he delights in that;
delighting in that,
he desires the future.

He thinks:

'May my tongue be such
in the distant future,
flavours such'
and bends his thought
to the acquisition of what is not (yet) acquired;
because he so bends his thought,
he delights in that;
delighting in that,
he desires the future.

He thinks:

'May my body be such
in the distant future,
tactile objects such'
and bends his thought
to the acquisition of what is not (yet) acquired;
because he so bends his thought,
he delights in that;
delighting in that,
he desires the future.

He thinks:

'May my mind be such
in the distant future,
mental objects such'
and bends his thought
to the acquisition of what is not (yet) acquired;
because he so bends his thought,
he delights in that;
delighting in that,
he desires the future.

It is thus, your reverences,
that one desires the future.

 


 

And how, your reverences,
does one not desire the future?

He thinks:

'May my eye be such
in the distant future,
maerial shapes such'
but does not bend his thought
to the acquisition of what is not (yet) acquired;
because he does not so bend his thought,
he does not delight in that;
not delighting in that,
he does not desire the future.

He thinks:

'May my ear be such
in the distant future,
sounds such'
but does not bend his thought
to the acquisition of what is not (yet) acquired;
because he does not so bend his thought,
he does not delight in that;
not delighting in that,
he does not desire the future.

He thinks:

'May my nose be such
in the distant future,
smells such'
but does not bend his thought
to the acquisition of what is not (yet) acquired;
because he does not so bend his thought,
he does not delight in that;
not delighting in that,
he does not desire the future.

He thinks:

'May my tongue be such
in the distant future,
flavours such'
but does not bend his thought
to the acquisition of what is not (yet) acquired;
because he does not so bend his thought,
he does not delight in that;
not delighting in that,
he does not desire the future.

He thinks:

'May my body be such
in the distant future,
tactile objects such'
but does not bend his thought
to the acquisition of what is not (yet) acquired;
because he does not so bend his thought,
he does not delight in that;
not delighting in that,
he does not desire the future.

He thinks:

'May my mind be such
in the distant future,
mental states such'
but does not bend his thought
to the acquisition of what is not (yet) acquired;
because he does not so bend his thought,
he does not delight in that;
not delighting in that,
he does not desire the future.

It is thus, your reverences,
that one does not desire the future.

 


 

And how, your reverences,
is one drawn away among present things?

If, your reverences,
there are at this present time
both eye and material shapes
to which his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment
at this same present time, (then)
because his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he delights in them;
delighting in them,
he is drawn away among present things.

If, your reverences,
there are at this present time
both ear and sounds
to which his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment
at this same present time, (then)
because his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he delights in them;
delighting in them,
he is drawn away among present things.

If, your reverences,
there are at this present time
both nose and smells
to which his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment
at this same present time, (then)
because his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he delights in them;
delighting in them,
he is drawn away among present things.

If, your reverences,
there are at this present time
both tongue and flavours
to which his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment
at this same present time, (then)
because his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he delights in them;
delighting in them,
he is drawn away among present things.

If, your reverences,
there are at this present time
both body and tactile objects
to which his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment
at this same present time, (then)
because his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he delights in them;
delighting in them,
he is drawn away among present things.

If, your reverences,
there are at this present time
both mind and mental states
to which his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment
at this same present time, (then)
because his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he delights in them;
delighting in them,
he is drawn away among present things.

It is thus, your reverences,
that one is drawn away among present things.

 


 

And how, your reverences, is one not drawn away among present things?

If, your reverences,
there are at this present time
both eye and material shapes
to which his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment
at this same present time, (then)
because his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he does not delight in them;
not delighting in them,
he is not drawn away among present things.

If, your reverences,
there are at this present time
both ear and sounds
to which his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment
at this same present time, (then)
because his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he does not delight in them;
not delighting in them,
he is not drawn away among present things.

If, your reverences,
there are at this present time
both nose and smells
to which his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment
at this same present time, (then)
because his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he does not delight in them;
not delighting in them,
he is not drawn away among present things.

If, your reverences,
there are at this present time
both tongue and flavours
to which his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment
at this same present time, (then)
because his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he does not delight in them;
not delighting in them,
he is not drawn away among present things.

If, your reverences,
there are at this present time
both body and tactile objects
to which his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment
at this same present time, (then)
because his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he does not delight in them;
not delighting in them,
he is not drawn away among present things.

If, your reverences,
there are at this present time
both mind and mental states
to which his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment
at this same present time, (then)
because his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he does not delight in them;
not delighting in them,
he is not drawn away among present things.

It is thus, your reverences,
that one is not drawn away among present things.

In regard to that exposition, your reverences,
that the Lord recited in brief
but the meaning of which he had not explained in full
when he rose from his seat
and entered a dwelling-place:

"The past should not be followed after, the future not desired.
What is past is got rid of and the future has not come.
But whoever has eye now here, now there, of a present thing,
Knowing that it is immovable, unshakable, let him cultivate it.
Swelter at the task this very day. Who knows whether he will die tomorrow?
There is no bargaining with the great hosts of Death.
Thus abiding ardently, unwearied day and night,
He indeed is 'Auspicious' called, described as a sage at peace."

Of this exposition
that was recited by the Lord in brief
but the meaning of which he did not explain in full,
I, your reverences, understand the meaning in full thus.

"Learned, monks, is Kaccāna the Great,
of great wisdom, monks, is Kaccāna the Great.

For if you, monks, had questioned me as to this meaning,
I too would have explained it
precisely as it was explained by Kaccāna the Great.

Indeed, this is the exact meaning of that,
and thus should you remember it:"[ed3]

"The past should not be followed after, the future not desired.
What is past is got rid of and the future has not come.
But whoever has eye now here, now there, of a present thing,
Knowing that it is immovable, unshakable, let him cultivate it.
Swelter at the task this very day. Who knows whether he will die tomorrow?
There is no bargaining with the great hosts of Death.
Thus abiding ardently, unwearied day and night,
He indeed is 'Auspicious' called, described as a sage at peace."

And how, your reverences, does one follow after the past?

He thinks:

'Such was my eye in the distant past,
such were material shapes,'
and his consciousness is bound fast there
by desire and attachment;
because his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he delights in it;
delighting in it
he follows after the past.

He thinks:

'Such was my ear in the distant past,
such were sounds,'
and his consciousness is bound fast there
by desire and attachment;
because his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he delights in it;
delighting in it
he follows after the past.

He thinks:

'Such was my nose in the distant past,
such were smells,'
and his consciousness is bound fast there
by desire and attachment;
because his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he delights in it;
delighting in it
he follows after the past.

He thinks:

'Such was my tongue in the distant past,
such were flavours,'
and his consciousness is bound fast there
by desire and attachment;
because his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he delights in it;
delighting in it
he follows after the past.

He thinks:

'Such was my body in the distant past,
such were tactile objects,'
and his consciousness is bound fast there
by desire and attachment;
because his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he delights in it;
delighting in it
he follows after the past.

He thinks:

'Such was my mind in the distant past,
such were mental states,'
and his consciousness is bound fast there
by desire and attachment;
because his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he delights in it;
delighting in it
he follows after the past.

It is thus, your reverences,
that one follows after the past.

 


 

And how, your reverences,
does one not follow after the past?

He thinks:

'Such was my eye in the distant past,
such were material shapes,'
but without his consciousness being bound fast there
by desire and attachment;
because his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he does not delight in it;
not delighting in it
he does not follow after the past.

He thinks:

'Such was my ear in the distant past,
such were sounds,'
but without his consciousness being bound fast there
by desire and attachment;
because his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he does not delight in it;
not delighting in it
he does not follow after the past.

He thinks:

'Such was my nose in the distant past,
such were smells,'
but without his consciousness being bound fast there
by desire and attachment;
because his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he does not delight in it;
not delighting in it
he does not follow after the past.

He thinks:

'Such was my tongue in the distant past,
such were flavours,'
but without his consciousness being bound fast there
by desire and attachment;
because his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he does not delight in it;
not delighting in it
he does not follow after the past.

He thinks:

'Such was my body in the distant past,
such were tactile objects,'
but without his consciousness being bound fast there
by desire and attachment;
because his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he does not delight in it;
not delighting in it
he does not follow after the past.

He thinks:

'Such was my mind in the distant past,
such were mental states,'
but without his consciousness being bound fast there
by desire and attachment;
because his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he does not delight in it;
not delighting in it
he does not follow after the past.

It is thus, your reverences,
that one does not follow after the past.

 


 

And how, your reverences,
does one desire the future?

He thinks:

'May my eye be such
in the distant future,
material shapes such'
and bends his thought
to the acquisition of what is not (yet) acquired;
because he so bends his thought,
he delights in that;
delighting in that,
he desires the future.

He thinks:

'May my ear be such
in the distant future,
sounds such'
and bends his thought
to the acquisition of what is not (yet) acquired;
because he so bends his thought,
he delights in that;
delighting in that,
he desires the future.

He thinks:

'May my nose be such
in the distant future,
smells such'
and bends his thought
to the acquisition of what is not (yet) acquired;
because he so bends his thought,
he delights in that;
delighting in that,
he desires the future.

He thinks:

'May my tongue be such
in the distant future,
flavours such'
and bends his thought
to the acquisition of what is not (yet) acquired;
because he so bends his thought,
he delights in that;
delighting in that,
he desires the future.

He thinks:

'May my body be such
in the distant future,
tactile objects such'
and bends his thought
to the acquisition of what is not (yet) acquired;
because he so bends his thought,
he delights in that;
delighting in that,
he desires the future.

He thinks:

'May my mind be such
in the distant future,
mental objects such'
and bends his thought
to the acquisition of what is not (yet) acquired;
because he so bends his thought,
he delights in that;
delighting in that,
he desires the future.

It is thus, your reverences,
that one desires the future.

 


 

And how, your reverences,
does one not desire the future?

He thinks:

'May my eye be such
in the distant future,
maerial shapes such'
but does not bend his thought
to the acquisition of what is not (yet) acquired;
because he does not so bend his thought,
he does not delight in that;
not delighting in that,
he does not desire the future.

He thinks:

'May my ear be such
in the distant future,
sounds such'
but does not bend his thought
to the acquisition of what is not (yet) acquired;
because he does not so bend his thought,
he does not delight in that;
not delighting in that,
he does not desire the future.

He thinks:

'May my nose be such
in the distant future,
smells such'
but does not bend his thought
to the acquisition of what is not (yet) acquired;
because he does not so bend his thought,
he does not delight in that;
not delighting in that,
he does not desire the future.

He thinks:

'May my tongue be such
in the distant future,
flavours such'
but does not bend his thought
to the acquisition of what is not (yet) acquired;
because he does not so bend his thought,
he does not delight in that;
not delighting in that,
he does not desire the future.

He thinks:

'May my body be such
in the distant future,
tactile objects such'
but does not bend his thought
to the acquisition of what is not (yet) acquired;
because he does not so bend his thought,
he does not delight in that;
not delighting in that,
he does not desire the future.

He thinks:

'May my mind be such
in the distant future,
mental states such'
but does not bend his thought
to the acquisition of what is not (yet) acquired;
because he does not so bend his thought,
he does not delight in that;
not delighting in that,
he does not desire the future.

It is thus, your reverences,
that one does not desire the future.

 


 

And how, your reverences,
is one drawn away among present things?

If, your reverences,
there are at this present time
both eye and material shapes
to which his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment
at this same present time, (then)
because his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he delights in them;
delighting in them,
he is drawn away among present things.

If, your reverences,
there are at this present time
both ear and sounds
to which his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment
at this same present time, (then)
because his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he delights in them;
delighting in them,
he is drawn away among present things.

If, your reverences,
there are at this present time
both nose and smells
to which his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment
at this same present time, (then)
because his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he delights in them;
delighting in them,
he is drawn away among present things.

If, your reverences,
there are at this present time
both tongue and flavours
to which his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment
at this same present time, (then)
because his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he delights in them;
delighting in them,
he is drawn away among present things.

If, your reverences,
there are at this present time
both body and tactile objects
to which his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment
at this same present time, (then)
because his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he delights in them;
delighting in them,
he is drawn away among present things.

If, your reverences,
there are at this present time
both mind and mental states
to which his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment
at this same present time, (then)
because his consciousness is bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he delights in them;
delighting in them,
he is drawn away among present things.

It is thus, your reverences,
that one is drawn away among present things.

 


 

And how, your reverences, is one not drawn away among present things?

If, your reverences,
there are at this present time
both eye and material shapes
to which his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment
at this same present time, (then)
because his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he does not delight in them;
not delighting in them,
he is not drawn away among present things.

If, your reverences,
there are at this present time
both ear and sounds
to which his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment
at this same present time, (then)
because his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he does not delight in them;
not delighting in them,
he is not drawn away among present things.

If, your reverences,
there are at this present time
both nose and smells
to which his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment
at this same present time, (then)
because his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he does not delight in them;
not delighting in them,
he is not drawn away among present things.

If, your reverences,
there are at this present time
both tongue and flavours
to which his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment
at this same present time, (then)
because his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he does not delight in them;
not delighting in them,
he is not drawn away among present things.

If, your reverences,
there are at this present time
both body and tactile objects
to which his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment
at this same present time, (then)
because his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he does not delight in them;
not delighting in them,
he is not drawn away among present things.

If, your reverences,
there are at this present time
both mind and mental states
to which his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment
at this same present time, (then)
because his consciousness is not bound fast
by desire and attachment,
he does not delight in them;
not delighting in them,
he is not drawn away among present things.

It is thus, your reverences,
that one is not drawn away among present things.

Thus spoke the Lord.

Delighted, these monks rejoiced in what the Lord had said.

Mahā Kaccāna's Discourse on the Auspicious:
The Third

 


[1] So called because it faced the Tapoda lake. At MA. v. 4 this is called "hot," tatta. Cf. SA.i. 38, VinA. ii. 512 and see B.D. i. 188, n. 1, 274, n. 6, K.S. i. 14, n. 6. See also S. i. 8 where likewise a devatā spoke to Samiddhi at this place.

[2] See M. Sta. 136. At Thag. 46 a verse is ascribed to him. See Pas. Breth., p. 61, n. 3.

[3] For notes on words in this passage see M.L.S. i. 183.

[4] Probably both the lake and the monastery.

[5] āvuso.

[6] Cf. M. i. ll0 ff.

[7] MA. v. 5-6 explains that in the two preceding Discourses and in the following one the headings (mātikā) and the analysis were made in respect of the five khandhā; but here the headings refer to the 12 (sense-)fields (āyatanā), i.e. the six sensory organs and their six (appropriate) sense-data.

[8] MA. v. 6 reads with a Burmese edn. nikanti viññāṇa, consciousness that is desire, craving, longing for.

[9] I.e. in "eye," etc. Cf. S. iv. 13 f., where one rejoices in the six sense-fields.

[10] etaṁ paccuppannaṁ.

[11] It would appear that "eye and material shapes" form a pair, expressed by the word ubhayaṁ. Attachment, etc., is to this (pair), tasmiṁ. So with the ear and sounds, etc.

[12] yeva paccuppanne.

[13] I.e. desine and attachment, but expressed by taṁ, again referring to the pair = both.

[14] Quoted at Asl. 420.

 


[ed1] Ms. Horner has 'vision' here, but it should be the organ as she has it in the following sections.

[ed2] This is left as is as the abridgment in Ms. Horners translation.

[ed3] This is not repeated in either the Pali or Ms. Horner's translation, but I have repeated it as that is the more usual way such conversations ended. It gives the bhikkhus one more opportunity to clarify their memory.


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