Majjhima Nikaya


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Majjhima Nikāya
III. Upari Paṇṇāsa
4. Vibhaŋga Vagga

The Middle Length Sayings
III. The Final Fifty Discourses
4. The Division on Analysis

Sutta 136

Saḷāyatana-Vibhaŋga Suttaɱ

Discourse on the Analysis of the Sixfold (Sense-) Field

Translated from the Pali by I.B. Horner, M.A.
Associate of Newham College, Cambridge
First Published in 1954

Copyright The Pali Text Society
Commercial Rights Reserved
Creative Commons Licence
For details see Terms of Use.

 


 

[1][chlm][than][upal] THUS HAVE I HEARD:

At one time the Lord was staying near Sāvatthī
in the Jeta Grove in Anāthapiṇḍika's monastery.

While he was there the Lord addressed the monks, saying:

"Monks."

"Revered One," these monks answered the Lord in assent.

The Lord spoke thus:

"I will teach you, monks,
the analysis of the sixfold (sense-) field.

Listen to it,
attend carefully
and I will speak."

"Yes, revered sir,"
these monks answered the Lord in assent.

The Lord spoke thus:

"Six internal sense-fields are to be known.

Six external sense-fields are to be known.

Six classes of consciousness are to be known.

Six classes of (sense-)impingement are to be known.

Eighteen mental ranges[1] are to be known.

Thirty-six modes for creatures[2] are to be known.

Wherefore, because of this
get rid of this.[3]

There are three arousings of mindfulness[4]
each of which [264] an ariyan practises
and, practising which,
is an ariyan who is a teacher fit to instruct a group.[5]

Of trainers[6]
he is called
the incomparable charioteer of men to be tamed.

 

§

 

This is the exposition[7] of the analysis
of the sixfold sense-field:

When it is said,

'Six internal sense-fields[8] are to be known,'

in reference to what is it said?

To the sense-field of eye,
the sense-field of ear,
the sense-field of nose,
the sense-field of tongue,
the sense-field of body,
the sense-field of mind.

When it is said,

'Six internal sense-fields are to be known,'

it is said in reference to this.

 

§

 

When it is said,

'Six external sense-fields are to be known,'

in reference to what is it said?

To the sense-field of material shape,
the sense-field of sound,
the sense-field of smell,
the sense-field of taste,
the sense-field of touch,
the sense-field of mental states.

When it is said,

'Six external sense-fields are to be known,'

it is said in reference to this.

 

§

 

When it is said,

'Six classes of consciousness are to be known,'

in reference to what is it said?

To visual consciousness,
auditory consciousness,
olfactory consciousness,
gustatory consciousness,
tactile consciousness,
mental consciousness.

When it is said,

'Six classes of consciousness are to be known,'

it is said in reference to this.

 

§

 

When it is said,

'Six classes of (sense-)impingement[9] are to be known,'

in reference to what is it said?

To visual impact,
auditory impact,
olfactory impact,
gustatory impact,
tactile impact,
mental impact.

When it is said,

'Six classes of (sense-)impingement are to be known,'

it is said in reference to this.

 

§

 

[265] When it is said,

'Eighteen mental ranges[10] are to be known,'

in reference to what is it said?

Having seen a material shape with the eye[11]
one ranges over[12] the material shape
that gives rise to joy,
ranges over the material shape
that gives rise to sorrow,
ranges over the material shape
that gives rise to equanimity.

Having heard a sound with the ear
one ranges over the sound
that gives rise to joy,
ranges over the sound
that gives rise to sorrow,
ranges over the sound
that gives rise to equanimity.

Having smelt a smell with the nose
one ranges over the smell
that gives rise to joy,
ranges over the smell
that gives rise to sorrow,
ranges over the smell
that gives rise to equanimity.

Having tasted a flavour with the tongue
one ranges over the flavour
that gives rise to joy,
ranges over the flavour
that gives rise to sorrow,
ranges over the flavour
that gives rise to equanimity.

Having felt a touch with the body
one ranges over the touch
that gives rise to joy,
ranges over the touch
that gives rise to sorrow,
ranges over the touch
that gives rise to equanimity.

Having cognised a mental state with the mind
one ranges over the mental state
that gives rise to joy,
ranges over the mental state
that gives rise to sorrow,
ranges over the mental state
that gives rise to equanimity.

In this way there are six ranges for joy,
six ranges for sorrow,
six ranges for equanimity.

When it is said,

'Eighteen mental ranges are to be known,'

it is said in reference to this.

 

§

 

When it is said,

'Thirty-six modes for creatures[13] are to be known,'

in reference to what is it said?

The six joys connected with worldly life,
the six joys connected with renunciation;
the six sorrows connected with worldly life,
the six sorrows connected with renunciation;
the six equanimities connected with worldly life,
the six equanimities connected with renunciation.

 


 

Herein what are the six joys connected with worldly life?

There is the joy that arises
either from attaining
and from beholding the attainment
of material shapes cognisable through the eye,
pleasant,
agreeable,
liked,
delightful,
connected with the material things of the world;
or from remembering
that what was formerly attained is past,
arrested,
altered.

Joy such as this is called
joy connected with worldly life.

There is the joy that arises
either from attaining
and from beholding the attainment
of sounds cognisable through the ear,
pleasant,
agreeable,
liked,
delightful,
connected with the material things of the world;
or from remembering
that what was formerly attained is past,
arrested,
altered.

Joy such as this is called
joy connected with worldly life.

There is the joy that arises
either from attaining
and from beholding the attainment
of smells cognisable through the nose,
pleasant,
agreeable,
liked,
delightful,
connected with the material things of the world;
or from remembering
that what was formerly attained is past,
arrested,
altered.

Joy such as this is called
joy connected with worldly life.

There is the joy that arises
either from attaining
and from beholding the attainment
of flavours cognisable through the tongue,
pleasant,
agreeable,
liked,
delightful,
connected with the material things of the world;
or from remembering
that what was formerly attained is past,
arrested,
altered.

Joy such as this is called
joy connected with worldly life.

There is the joy that arises
either from attaining
and from beholding the attainment
of touches cognisable through the body,
pleasant,
agreeable,
liked,
delightful,
connected with the material things of the world;
or from remembering
that what was formerly attained is past,
arrested,
altered.

Joy such as this is called
joy connected with worldly life.

There is the joy that arises
either from attaining
and from beholding the attainment
of mental states cognisable through the mind,
pleasant,
agreeable,
liked,
delightful,
connected with the material things of the world;
or from remembering
that what was formerly attained is past,
arrested,
altered.

Joy such as this is called
joy connected with worldly life.[14]

These are the six joys connected with worldly life.

 


 

Herein what are the six joys connected with renunciation?

When [266] one has known the impermanency of material shapes themselves,
their alteration,
disappearance[15]
and arrest,
and thinks,

'Formerly as well as now
all these material shapes are impermanent,
painful,
liable to alteration,'

from seeing this thus
as it really is
by means of perfect wisdom,
joy arises.

Joy such as this is called
joy connected with renunciation.

When one has known the impermanency of sounds themselves,
their alteration,
disappearance
and arrest,
and thinks,

'Formerly as well as now
all these sounds are impermanent,
painful,
liable to alteration,'

from seeing this thus
as it really is
by means of perfect wisdom,
joy arises.

Joy such as this is called
joy connected with renunciation.

When one has known the impermanency of smells themselves,
their alteration,
disappearance
and arrest,
and thinks,

'Formerly as well as now
all these smells are impermanent,
painful,
liable to alteration,'

from seeing this thus
as it really is
by means of perfect wisdom,
joy arises.

Joy such as this is called
joy connected with renunciation.

When one has known the impermanency of flavours themselves,
their alteration,
disappearance
and arrest,
and thinks,

'Formerly as well as now
all these flavours are impermanent,
painful,
liable to alteration,'

from seeing this thus
as it really is
by means of perfect wisdom,
joy arises.

Joy such as this is called
joy connected with renunciation.

When one has known the impermanency of touches themselves,
their alteration,
disappearance
and arrest,
and thinks,

'Formerly as well as now
all these touches are impermanent,
painful,
liable to alteration,'

from seeing this thus
as it really is
by means of perfect wisdom,
joy arises.

Joy such as this is called
joy connected with renunciation.

When one has known the impermanency of mental states themselves,
their alteration,
disappearance
and arrest,
and thinks,

'Formerly as well as now
all these mental states are impermanent,
painful,
liable to alteration,'

from seeing this thus
as it really is
by means of perfect wisdom,
joy arises.

Joy such as this is called
joy connected with renunciation.

 


 

Herein what are the six sorrows
connected with worldly life?

There is the sorrow that arises
either from not attaining
and from beholding the non-attainment
of material shapes cognisable through the eye,
pleasant,
agreeable,
liked,
delightful,
connected with the material things of the world;
or from remembering
that what was formerly not attained
is past,
arrested,
altered.

Sorrow such as this is called
sorrow connected with worldly life.

There is the sorrow that arises
either from not attaining
and from beholding the non-attainment
of sounds cognisable through the ear,
pleasant,
agreeable,
liked,
delightful,
connected with the material things of the world;
or from remembering
that what was formerly not attained
is past,
arrested,
altered.

Sorrow such as this is called
sorrow connected with worldly life.

There is the sorrow that arises
either from not attaining
and from beholding the non-attainment
of smells cognisable through the nose,
pleasant,
agreeable,
liked,
delightful,
connected with the material things of the world;
or from remembering
that what was formerly not attained
is past,
arrested,
altered.

Sorrow such as this is called
sorrow connected with worldly life.

There is the sorrow that arises
either from not attaining
and from beholding the non-attainment
of flavours cognisable through the tongue,
pleasant,
agreeable,
liked,
delightful,
connected with the material things of the world;
or from remembering
that what was formerly not attained
is past,
arrested,
altered.

Sorrow such as this is called
sorrow connected with worldly life.

There is the sorrow that arises
either from not attaining
and from beholding the non-attainment
of touches cognisable through the body,
pleasant,
agreeable,
liked,
delightful,
connected with the material things of the world;
or from remembering
that what was formerly not attained
is past,
arrested,
altered.

Sorrow such as this is called
sorrow connected with worldly life.

There is the sorrow that arises
either from not attaining
and from beholding the non-attainment
of mental states cognisable through the mind,
pleasant,
agreeable,
liked,
delightful,
connected with the material things of the world;
or from remembering
that what was formerly not attained
is past,
arrested,
altered.

Sorrow such as this is called
sorrow connected with worldly life.[16]

 


 

Herein what are the six sorrows connected with renunciation?

When one has known the impermanency
of material shapes themselves,
their alteration,
disappearance
and arrest,
and thinks,

'Formerly as well as now
all these material shapes
are impermanent,
painful,
liable to alteration,'

from seeing this thus
as it really is
by means of perfect wisdom,
he evinces a desire
for the incomparable Deliverances,[17] thinking,'

When can I,
entering on
abide in that plane
which the ariyans, now entering on,
are abiding in?

Thus, from evincing [267] a desire
for the incomparable Deliverances
sorrow arises
as a result of the desire.

Sorrow such as this is called
sorrow connected with renunciation.

When one has known the impermanency
of sounds themselves,
their alteration,
disappearance
and arrest,
and thinks,

'Formerly as well as now
all these sounds
are impermanent,
painful,
liable to alteration,'

from seeing this thus
as it really is
by means of perfect wisdom,
he evinces a desire
for the incomparable Deliverances, thinking,'

When can I,
entering on
abide in that plane
which the ariyans, now entering on,
are abiding in?

Thus, from evincing a desire
for the incomparable Deliverances
sorrow arises
as a result of the desire.

Sorrow such as this is called
sorrow connected with renunciation.

When one has known the impermanency
of smells themselves,
their alteration,
disappearance
and arrest,
and thinks,

'Formerly as well as now
all these smells
are impermanent,
painful,
liable to alteration,'

from seeing this thus
as it really is
by means of perfect wisdom,
he evinces a desire
for the incomparable Deliverances, thinking,'

When can I,
entering on
abide in that plane
which the ariyans, now entering on,
are abiding in?

Thus, from evincing a desire
for the incomparable Deliverances
sorrow arises
as a result of the desire.

Sorrow such as this is called
sorrow connected with renunciation.

When one has known the impermanency
of flavours themselves,
their alteration,
disappearance
and arrest,
and thinks,

'Formerly as well as now
all these flavours
are impermanent,
painful,
liable to alteration,'

from seeing this thus
as it really is
by means of perfect wisdom,
he evinces a desire
for the incomparable Deliverances, thinking,'

When can I,
entering on
abide in that plane
which the ariyans, now entering on,
are abiding in?

Thus, from evincing a desire
for the incomparable Deliverances
sorrow arises
as a result of the desire.

Sorrow such as this is called
sorrow connected with renunciation.

When one has known the impermanency
of touches themselves,
their alteration,
disappearance
and arrest,
and thinks,

'Formerly as well as now
all these touches
are impermanent,
painful,
liable to alteration,'

from seeing this thus
as it really is
by means of perfect wisdom,
he evinces a desire
for the incomparable Deliverances, thinking,'

When can I,
entering on
abide in that plane
which the ariyans, now entering on,
are abiding in?

Thus, from evincing a desire
for the incomparable Deliverances
sorrow arises
as a result of the desire.

Sorrow such as this is called
sorrow connected with renunciation.

When one has known the impermanency
of mental states themselves,
their alteration,
disappearance
and arrest,
and thinks,

'Formerly as well as now
all these mental states
are impermanent,
painful,
liable to alteration,'

from seeing this thus
as it really is
by means of perfect wisdom,
he evinces a desire
for the incomparable Deliverances, thinking,'

When can I,
entering on
abide in that plane
which the ariyans, now entering on,
are abiding in?

Thus, from evincing a desire
for the incomparable Deliverances
sorrow arises
as a result of the desire.

Sorrow such as this is called
sorrow connected with renunciation.

These are the six sorrows connected with renunciation.

 


 

Herein what are the six equanimities
connected with worldly life?

When a foolish,
errant,
average person
has seen a material shape with the eye,
there arises the equanimity
of an uninstructed average person
who has not conquered (his defilements),[18]
who has not conquered fruition,[19]
who does not see the peril[20] -
equanimity such as this
does not go further than material shape.

Therefore this is called
equanimity connected with worldly life.[21]

When a foolish,
errant,
average person
has heard a sound with the ear,
there arises the equanimity
of an uninstructed average person
who has not conquered (his defilements),
who has not conquered fruition,
who does not see the peril -
equanimity such as this
does not go further than sound.

Therefore this is called
equanimity connected with worldly life.

When a foolish,
errant,
average person
has smelt a smell with the nose,
there arises the equanimity
of an uninstructed average person
who has not conquered (his defilements),
who has not conquered fruition,
who does not see the peril -
equanimity such as this
does not go further than smell.

Therefore this is called
equanimity connected with worldly life.

When a foolish,
errant,
average person
has tasted a flavour with the tongue,
there arises the equanimity
of an uninstructed average person
who has not conquered (his defilements),
who has not conquered fruition,
who does not see the peril -
equanimity such as this
does not go further than flavour.

Therefore this is called
equanimity connected with worldly life.

When a foolish,
errant,
average person
has felt a touch with the body,
there arises the equanimity
of an uninstructed average person
who has not conquered (his defilements),
who has not conquered fruition,
who does not see the peril -
equanimity such as this
does not go further than touch.

Therefore this is called
equanimity connected with worldly life.

When a foolish,
errant,
average person
has cognised a mental state with the mind,
there arises the equanimity
of an uninstructed average person
who has not conquered (his defilements),
who has not conquered fruition,
who does not see the peril -
equanimity such as this
does not go further than mental state.

Therefore this is called
equanimity connected with worldly life.

These are the six equanimities
connected with worldly life.

 


 

Herein what are the six equanimities
connected with renunciation?

When one has known the impermanency
of material shapes themselves,
their alteration,
disappearance
and arrest,
and thinks,

'Formerly as well as now
all these material shapes are impermanent,
painful,
liable to alteration,'

from seeing this thus
as it really is
by means of perfect wisdom,
equanimity arises.

Equanimity such as this
goes further than material shape.

Therefore it is called
equanimity connected with renunciation.

When one has known the impermanency
of sounds themselves,
their alteration,
disappearance
and arrest,
and thinks,

'Formerly as well as now
all these sounds are impermanent,
painful,
liable to alteration,'

from seeing this thus
as it really is
by means of perfect wisdom,
equanimity arises.

Equanimity such as this
goes further than sounds.

Therefore it is called
equanimity connected with renunciation.

When one has known the impermanency
of smells themselves,
their alteration,
disappearance
and arrest,
and thinks,

'Formerly as well as now
all these smells are impermanent,
painful,
liable to alteration,'

from seeing this thus
as it really is
by means of perfect wisdom,
equanimity arises.

Equanimity such as this
goes further than smells.

Therefore it is called
equanimity connected with renunciation.

When one has known the impermanency
of [268] flavours themselves,
their alteration,
disappearance
and arrest,
and thinks,

'Formerly as well as now
all these flavours are impermanent,
painful,
liable to alteration,'

from seeing this thus
as it really is
by means of perfect wisdom,
equanimity arises.

Equanimity such as this
goes further than flavours.

Therefore it is called
equanimity connected with renunciation.

When one has known the impermanency
of touches themselves,
their alteration,
disappearance
and arrest,
and thinks,

'Formerly as well as now
all these touches are impermanent,
painful,
liable to alteration,'

from seeing this thus
as it really is
by means of perfect wisdom,
equanimity arises.

Equanimity such as this
goes further than touches.

Therefore it is called
equanimity connected with renunciation.

When one has known the impermanency
of mental states themselves,
their alteration,
disappearance
and arrest,
and thinks,

'Formerly as well as now
all these mental states are impermanent,
painful,
liable to alteration,'

from seeing this thus
as it really is
by means of perfect wisdom,
equanimity arises.

Equanimity such as this
goes further than mental states.

Therefore it is called
equanimity connected with renunciation.

These are the six equanimities connected with renunciation.

When it is said,

'Thirty-six modes for creatures are to be known,'

it is said in reference to this.

 

§

 

Herein when it is said,

'Wherefore, because of this
get rid of this'

in reference to what is it said?

Herein, monks, because of[22]
and by means of[22] these six joys connected with renunciation,
get rid of
and transcend
those six joys connected with worldly life.

Thus is the getting rid of these,
thus is their transcending.[23]

Herein, monks, because of
and by means of
these six sorrows connected with renunciation,
get rid of
and transcend
those six sorrows connected with worldly life.

Thus is the getting rid of these,
thus is their transcending.

Herein, monks, because of
and by means of
these six equanimities connected with renunciation,
get rid of
and transcend
those six equanimities connected with worldly life.

Thus is the getting rid of these,
thus is their transcending.

Herein, monks, because of
and by means of
these six joys connected with renunciation,
get rid of
and transcend
those six sorrows connected with renunciation.

Thus is the getting rid of these,
thus is their transcending.

Herein, monks, because of
and by means of
these six equanimities connected with renunciation,
get rid of
and transcend
those six joys connected with renunciation.

Thus is the getting rid of these,
thus is their transcending.

 


 

There is, monks, equanimity in face of multiformity,
connected with multiformity;
there is equanimity in face of uniformity,
connected with uniformity.[24]

And what, monks, is equanimity in face of multiformity,
connected with multiformity?

It is, monks,
equanimity among material shapes,
equanimity among sounds,
equanimity among smells,
equanimity among flavours,
equanimity among touches.

This, monks, is equanimity in face of multiformity,
connected with multiformity.

And what, monks, is equanimity in face of uniformity,
connected with uniformity?

It is, monks, equanimity connected with the plane of infinite ether,
connected with the plane of infinite consciousness,
connected with the plane [269] of no-thing,
connected with the plane of neither-perception-nor-non-perception.

This, monks, is equanimity in face of uniformity,
connected with uniformity.

Herein, monks, because of
and by means of
this equanimity in face of uniformity,
connected with uniformity,
get rid of
and transcend
that equanimity in face of multiformity,
connected with multiformity.

Thus is the getting rid of it,
thus is its transcending.

Because of lack of desire,[25] monks,
by means of lack of desire,
get rid of
and transcend
that equanimity in face of uniformity,
connected with uniformity.

Thus is the getting rid of it,
thus is its transcending.

When it is said,

'Wherefore because of this
get rid of this,'

it is said in reference to this.

 

§

 

When it is said,

'There are three arousings of mindfulness
each of which an ariyan practises
and, practising which,
is an ariyan who is a teacher
fit to instruct a group,'

in reference to what is it said?

As to this,[26] monks,
a teacher teaches dhamma to disciples,
compassionate,
seeking their welfare,
out of compassion,
saying:

'This is for your welfare,
this is for your happiness.'

But his disciples do not listen,
do not lend ear,
do not prepare their minds for profound knowledge
and, turning aside,
move away from the teacher's instruction.

Herein, monks, the Tathāāgata is neither delighted
nor does he experience delight,
but dwells untroubled,[27]
mindful
and clearly conscious.

This, monks, is the first arousing of mindfulness
that the ariyan practises
and, practising it,
is an ariyan who is a teacher
fit to instruct a group.

And again, monks, a teacher teaches dhamma to disciples,
compassionate,
seeking their welfare,
out of compassion,
saying:

'This is for your welfare,
this is for your happiness.'

Some of his disciples do not listen,
do not lend ear,
do not prepare their minds for profound knowledge
and, turning aside,
move away from the teacher's instruction.

But some disciples listen,
lend ear,
prepare their minds for profound knowledge
and, not turning aside,
do not move away from the teacher's instruction.

Herein, monks, the Tathāāgata is neither delighted
nor does he experience delight
and neither is he depressed
nor does he experience depression.

Having ousted both delight and depression,
he dwells with equanimity,
mindful and clearly conscious.

This, monks, is the second arousing of mindfulness
that the ariyan practises
and, practising it,
is an ariyan who is a teacher
fit to instruct a group.

[270] And again, monks, a teacher teaches dhamma to disciples,
compassionate,
seeking their welfare,
out of compassion,
saying:

'This is for your welfare,
this is for your happiness.'

His disciples listen,
lend ear,
prepare their minds for profound knowledge
and, not turning aside,
do not move from the teacher's instruction.

Herein, monks, the Tathāgata is delighted
and he experiences delight
but he dwells untroubled,[28]
mindful and clearly conscious.

This, monks, is the third arousing of mindfulness
that the ariyan practises
and, practising it,
is an ariyan who is a teacher
fit to instruct a group.

When it is said:

'There are three arousings of mindfulness
each of which an ariyan practises
and, practising which,
is an ariyan who is a teacher
fit to instruct a group,'

it is said in reference to this.

 

§

 

When it is said,

'Of trainers
he is called the incomparable charioteer of men to be tamed,'

in reference to what is it said?

When, monks, an elephant to be tamed
is driven[29] by the elephant-tamer
it runs in one direction only -
to the east
or west
or north
or south.

When, monks, a horse to be tamed
is driven by the horse-tamer
it runs in one direction only -
to the east
or west
or north
or south.

When, monks, a bull to be tamed
is driven by the bull-tamer
it runs in one direction only -
to the east
or west
or north
or south.

When, monks, a man to be tamed
is driven by the Tathāāgata,
perfected one,
fully Self-Awakened One
he courses[30] to eight quarters:[31]

Being in the fine-material sphere,
he sees material shapes;
this is the first quarter.

Not perceiving material shape internally
he sees external material shapes;
this is the second quarter.

By thinking of the Fair,
he is intent on it;
this is the third quarter.

By passing quite beyond perceptions of material shape,
by sinking perceptions of sensory reactions,
by not attending to perceptions of variety,
and thinking,
'Ether is unending,'
entering on the plane of infinite ether
he abides in it;
this is the fourth quarter.

By passing quite beyond the plane [271] of infinite ether,
thinking,
'Consciousness is unending,'
entering on the plane of infinite consciousness,
he abides in it;
this is the fifth quarter.

By passing quite beyond the plane of infinite consciousness,
thinking,
'There is not anything,'
entering on the plane of no-thing,
he abides in it;
this is the sixth quarter.

By passing quite beyond the plane of no-thing,
entering on the plane of neither-pereeeption-nor-non-perception,
he abides in it;
this is the seventh quarter.

By passing quite beyond the plane of neither-perception-nor-non-perception,
entering on the stopping of perception and feeling,
he abides in it;
this is the eighth quarter.

When, monks, a man to be tamed
is driven by the Tathāāgata,
perfected one,
fully Self-Awakened One,
he courses to these eight quarters.

When it is said,

' Of trainers
he is called the incomparable charioteer
of men to be tamed,'

it is said in reference to this."

Thus spoke the Lord.

Delighted, these monks rejoiced in what the Lord had said.

Discourse on the Analysis of the Sixfold (Sense-)Field:
The Seventh

 


[1] manopavicārā. MA. v. 21 says manassa upavicārā, discriminations or applications, ranges or spheres of the mind or mental activity. See B.H.S.D.

[2] sattapadā. MA. v. 21 calls this the tracks, ways, lots, padā, of creatures rooted in vaṭṭa, the whirligig of becoming (eighteen modes) and vivaṭṭa (eighteen modes).

[3] tatr'idaṁ nissāya idaṁ pajahatha. All these brief expositions, statements or headings (mātikā) arc explained during the course of this Sutta.

[4] These three satipaṭṭhāna have nothing to do with the four usual ones, as is clear from the analysis below, p. 269. They are, more precisely, āveṇikā (special, exceptional) satipaṭṭhāna of a Buddha, his even-mindedness, sama-cittatā, when his audience listens, does not listen, or partly both. See B.H.S.D. under āveṇika and sm.rty-upasthāna. At Divy. 182, 268, we get: tribhir āveṇikaiḥ sm.rtyupasthānair; and at Divy. 126 tribhiḥ sm.rtyupasthānair Cf. the eighteen special, peculiar attributes of a Buddha, āveṇikā Buddha-dharmā, enumerated at Mhvu. i. 160. And cf. e.g.. śatasāhasrikā ix. 1449-1450 (translated at Buddhist Texts through the Ages, p. 146) where among the attributes is included "his mindfulness never fails" and "there is no falling off in mindfulness," nāsti sm.rtihāniḥ, although this, from the context, almost certainly refers not to the three, but to the four arousings of mindfulness. Pali has no such list, although eighteen Buddhadhammā are referred to at Miln. 105, 285, UdA. 87. Apart from the above Discourse, I know of no other passage in the Pali canon that expounds these three satipaṭṭhāna.

[5] tayo satipaṭṭhānā, yad ariyo sevati yad ariyo sevamāno satthā gaṇaṁ anusāsituṁ arahati. The two occurrences of yad in this sentence have the effect of referring not to these three satipaṭṭhānā as a whole or unit but to whiohever one of them is called forth by the circumstances: of the disciples listening, not listening, or some listening and some not; see previous note. Also see the gloss of yad ariyo at MA. v. 27: yad ariyo ti ye satipaṭṭhāne ariyo sammāsambuddho sevati. Tattha tīsu ṭhānesu ṭhapento satipaṭṭhāne sevatī ti veditabbo: "which an ariyan" means those arousings of mindfulness which an ariyan who is a fully self-awakencd one practises. Here it is to be understood that, setting up mindfuiness in the three (sets of) circumstances, he practises the arousings of mindfuiness.

[6] yoggācariya, as at M. i. 124, iii. 97.

[7] uddesa, called at MA. v. 21 mātikāṭhapanaṁ, the establishment or statement of the headings.

[8] For this and the next three headings cf. D. iii. 243, etc.

[9] Cf. the "six feelings" at S. iv. 232.

[10] Cf. M. iii. 239 f. for cha somanassūpavicārā cha domanasūpavicārā cha upekhūpavicārā, also recorded at D. iii. 244 fṁ, Vbh. 381. Cf. the "eighteen feelings" at S. iv. 232.

[11] With visual consciousness, MA. v. 22; cf. VbhA. 508.

[12] upavicarati.

[13] Cf. the "thirty-six feelings" at S. iv. 232.

[14] Cf. Vism. 319.

[15] virāga, explained at MA. v. 22 by vigacchanena virāgaṁ.

[16] Cf. Vism. 319.

[17] MA. v. 23 says incomparable deliverance is called arahantship.

[18] anodhijina, one who has not conquered the whole extent (odhi, or, to the limit) of the kilesas, therefore one whose cankers are not destroyed, MA. v. 24. Cf. Vbh. 246.

[19] avipākajina. MA. v. 24 says, similarly one whose cankers are not destroyed. For a conqueror of fruition is called one whoso cankers are destroyed because he has conquered āyatiṁ vipākaṁ, the fruition (of deeds done here or in former births) to their (full) stretch.

[20] ādīnava, which, often connected with sense pleasures, is at MA. v. 24 connected with misfortune or distress, upaddava.

[21] It is the equanimity of not knowing, MA. v. 24.

[22] tāni nissāya tāni āgamma. Cf. KhpA. 229 āgammā ti nissāya.

[23] Cf. M. i. 445.

[24] Cf. M. i. 364-367.

[25] atammayatā as at M. iii. 42.

[26] Cf. M. iii. 117.

[27] anavassuta; here, not overflowing with repulsion, paṭigha, MA. v. 27.

[28] Here, not overflowing with rāga, attachment.

[29] sārita, past participle both of sāreti, causative of sarati, to go, to run, to move along, to flow; and of sarati, to call to mind, to remember. Cf. sāreyya at M. i. 124, explained by MA. ii. 98 as ujukuṁ peseyya, should send (him) forth straight; but MA. v. 27 explains sūrita by damita, tamed.

[30] vidhāvati, to run about, to roam, to rove; dhāvati being to run, to run quickly. Here vidhāvati, is used of the mind only; for the man sits down cross-legged, does not twist his body round for no matter which quarter he is facing (in the physical sense, E, W, N, S), he attains these eight attainments: the Deliverances at the same time as the "quarters," MA. v. 28; and naturally, since they appear to be the same as one another.

[31] These quarters or directions are the same as the eight Deliverances as given, e.g.. at M. ii. 12, and which are to be (mentally) developed.


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