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Saɱyutta Nikāya
4. Saḷāyatana Vagga
35. Saḷāyatana Saɱyutta
§ IV: Paññāsaka Catuttha
1. Nandi-k-Khaya Vagga

The Book of the Kindred Sayings
4. The Book Called the Saḷāyatana-Vagga
Containing Kindred Sayings on the 'Six-Fold Sphere' of Sense and Other Subjects
35. Kindred Sayings the Sixfold Sphere of Sense
§ IV: The 'Fourth Fifty' Suttas
1. The Chapter on the Destruction of the Lure

Sutta 159

Paṭhama Jīvakam-Bavane aka Samādhi Suttaɱ

In Jīvaka's Mango Grove (i)

Translated by F. L. Woodward
Edited by Mrs. Rhys Davids

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[91]

[1] Thus have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was staying near Rājagaha in Jivaka's[1] Mango Grove.

Then the Exalted One addressed the brethren, saying:

"Brethren."

"Lord," responded those brethren to the Exalted One.

Then the Exalted One thus addressed the brethren:

[92] "Do ye practise concentration, brethren.

To a brother who is composed
there is a manifestation of a thing's reality.[2]

And what, Brethren, is manifested as it really is?

The impermanence of the eye, Brethren, is manifested as it really is
the impermanence of objects is manifested as it really is,
the impermanence of eye-consciousness is manifested as it really is,
the impermanence of eye-contact is manifested as it really is,
the impermanence of the weal or woe or neutral state experienced that arises owing to eye-contact that also is manifested as it really is

The impermanence of the ear, Brethren, is manifested as it really is
the impermanence of sounds is manifested as it really is,
the impermanence of ear-consciousness is manifested as it really is,
the impermanence of ear-contact is manifested as it really is,
the impermanence of the weal or woe or neutral state experienced that arises owing to ear-contact that also is manifested as it really is

The impermanence of the nose, Brethren, is manifested as it really is
the impermanence of scents is manifested as it really is,
the impermanence of nose-consciousness is manifested as it really is,
the impermanence of nose-contact is manifested as it really is,
the impermanence of the weal or woe or neutral state experienced that arises owing to nose-contact that also is manifested as it really is

The impermanence of the tongue, Brethren, is manifested as it really is
the impermanence of savours is manifested as it really is,
the impermanence of tongue-consciousness is manifested as it really is,
the impermanence of tongue-contact is manifested as it really is,
the impermanence of the weal or woe or neutral state experienced that arises owing to tongue-contact that also is manifested as it really is

The impermanence of the body, Brethren, is manifested as it really is
the impermanence of tangibles is manifested as it really is,
the impermanence of body-consciousness is manifested as it really is,
the impermanence of body-contact is manifested as it really is,
the impermanence of the weal or woe or neutral state experienced that arises owing to body-contact that also is manifested as it really is

The impermanence of the mind, Brethren, is manifested as it really is
the impermanence of mind-states is manifested as it really is,
the impermanence of mind-consciousness is manifested as it really is,
the impermanence of mind-contact is manifested as it really is,
the impermanence of the weal or woe or neutral state experienced that arises owing to mind-contact that also is manifested as it really is

Do ye practise concentration, brethren.

To a brother who is composed
there is a manifestation of a thing's reality."

 


[1] Cf. Sisters, 148 n. Jīvaka was physician to Bimbisāra, rajah of Magadha.

[2] Yathābhūtaŋ okkhāyati. I follow Comy., who says paññāyati, pākaṭaŋ hoti, tho meaning of akkhāyati. But Pali Dict. s.v. (the only instance of the word) takes it as meaning 'to lie low, be restrained.' Three Sinhalese MSS. of text read pakkhāyati. Text and my MSS. of Comy. read okkhāyati.


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