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Saɱyutta Nikāya:
IV. Saḷāyatana Vagga
36: Vedanā Saɱyutta
II. Rahogata Vagga

The Book of the
Kindred Sayings
36: Kindred Sayings about Feeling
Book II: The Chapter on Solitude

Sutta 19

Pañcakaŋga Suttaɱ

Fivetools[1]

Translated by F. L. Woodward
Edited by Mrs. Rhys Davids

Copyright The Pali Text Society
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[1][bodh][nypo]

Now Fivetools, the carpenter,
came to visit the venerable Udāyi[2]
and on coming to him,
saluted him
and sat down at [150] one side.

So seated Fivetools, the carpenter,
said to the venerable Udāyi: -

"Pray, master Udāyi,
how many feelings are spoken of by the Exalted One?"

"Three feelings, carpenter,
are spoken of by the Exalted One, -
pleasant feeling,
painful feeling
and feeling that is neither pleasant nor painful.

These are the three."

At these words Fivetools, the carpenter,
said to the venerable Udāyi: -

"Not three feelings
were spoken of by the Exalted One, master Udāyi.

There are two feelings, -
pleasant
and painful feeling.

As to this neutral feeling,
it was spoken of by the Exalted One
as belonging to pure and perfect bliss."[3]

Then a second time the venerable Udāyi
said to the carpenter Fivetools: -

"Not two feelings, carpenter,
were spoken of by the Exalted One.

Three feelings were spoken of by the Exalted One, -
pleasant,
painful
and neutral feelings.

These are the three so spoken of."

Then a second time also Fivetools, the carpenter,
said to the venerable Udāyi: -

"No, master Udāyi.

Not three feelings
were spoken of by the Exalted One, master Udāyi.

There are two feelings, -
pleasant
and painful feeling.

As to this neutral feeling,
it was spoken of by the Exalted One
as belonging to pure and perfect bliss."

Then a third time the venerable Udāyi
said to the carpenter Fivetools: -

"Not two feelings, carpenter,
were spoken of by the Exalted One.

Three feelings were spoken of by the Exalted One, -
pleasant,
painful
and neutral feelings.

These are the three so spoken of."

Then a third time also Fivetools, the carpenter,
said to the venerable Udāyi: -

"No, master Udāyi.

Not three feelings
were spoken of by the Exalted One, master Udāyi.

There are two feelings, -
pleasant
and painful feeling.

As to this neutral feeling,
it was spoken of by the Exalted One
as belonging to pure and perfect bliss."

So neither could convince the other.

 


 

Now the venerable Ānanda
overheard the talk between the venerable Udāyi and Fivetools, the carpenter.

Thereupon the venerable Ānanda went to the Exalted One
on coming to him greeted him courteously,
and after the exchange of greetings and compliments
sat down at one side.

Seated at one side he said to the Exalted One: -

"Just now Fivetools, the carpenter,
came to visit the venerable Udāyi
and on coming to him,
saluted him
and sat down at one side.

So seated Fivetools, the carpenter,
said to the venerable Udāyi: -

'Pray, master Udāyi,
how many feelings are spoken of by the Exalted One?'

'Three feelings, carpenter,
are spoken of by the Exalted One, -
pleasant feeling,
painful feeling
and feeling that is neither pleasant nor painful.

These are the three.'

At these words Fivetools, the carpenter,
said to the venerable Udāyi: -

'Not three feelings
were spoken of by the Exalted One, master Udāyi.

There are two feelings, -
pleasant
and painful feeling.

As to this neutral feeling,
it was spoken of by the Exalted One
as belonging to pure and perfect bliss.'

Then a second time the venerable Udāyi
said to the carpenter Fivetools: -

'Not two feelings, carpenter,
were spoken of by the Exalted One.

Three feelings were spoken of by the Exalted One, -
pleasant,
painful
and neutral feelings.

These are the three so spoken of.'

Then a second time also Fivetools, the carpenter,
said to the venerable Udāyi: -

'No, master Udāyi.

Not three feelings
were spoken of by the Exalted One, master Udāyi.

There are two feelings, -
pleasant
and painful feeling.

As to this neutral feeling,
it was spoken of by the Exalted One
as belonging to pure and perfect bliss.'

Then a third time the venerable Udāyi
said to the carpenter Fivetools: -

'Not two feelings, carpenter,
were spoken of by the Exalted One.

Three feelings were spoken of by the Exalted One, -
pleasant,
painful
and neutral feelings.

These are the three so spoken of.'

Then a third time also Fivetools, the carpenter,
said to the venerable Udāyi: -

'No, master Udāyi.

Not three feelings
were spoken of by the Exalted One, master Udāyi.

There are two feelings, -
pleasant
and painful feeling.

As to this neutral feeling,
it was spoken of by the Exalted One
as belonging to pure and perfect bliss.'

So neither could convince the other."

 


 

Then the Exalted One said: -

"Though it was true, Ānanda,
Fivetools the carpenter did not agree
with the explanation of the brother Udāyi,
nor would the latter
agree with the explanation of the former,
though it was true.

[151] There are two feelings, Ānanda,
in mv way of explaining.

There are also three feelings, Ānanda,
in my way of explaining.

There are also five feelings, Ānanda,
in my way of explaining.

There are also six feelings, Ānanda,
in my way of explaining.

There are also eighteen feelings, Ānanda,
in my way of explaining.

There are also thirty-six feelings, Ānanda,
in my way of explaining.

There are also one hundred and eight[4] feelings in mv way of explaining, Ānanda.

Such is the exposition of the Norm taught by me, Ānanda.

Though I have thus expounded my method of teaching the Norm, Ānanda,
of those who will not approve of,
will not agree with,
each other's exposition of it,
however well said and spoken, -
of such you may expect this:

They will dwell quarrelsome,
wrangling,
disputatious,
wounding each other with the weapons of the tongue.[5]

Now such is the method of the Norm,
as expounded by me.

When I have so expounded it,
those who approve of,
agree with,
each other's exposition of it,
being well said andspoken, -
of such you may expect this:

They will dwell in harmony,
courteous,
without quarrelling,
like milk and water mixed,
looking on one another
with the eye of affection.

 


 

There are these five sensual elements, Ānanda.

What five?

Objects cognizable by the eve,
desirable,
pleasant,
delightful
and dear,
passion-fraught,
inciting to lust.

Sounds[ed1] cognizable by the ear,
desirable,
pleasant,
delightful
and dear,
passion-fraught,
inciting to lust.

Scents cognizable by the nose,
desirable,
pleasant,
delightful
and dear,
passion-fraught,
inciting to lust.

Savours cognizable by the tongue,
desirable,
pleasant,
delightful
and dear,
passion-fraught,
inciting to lust.

Tangibles cognizable by the body,
desirable,
pleasant,
delightful
and dear,
passion-fraught,
inciting to lust.

These, Ānanda, are the five sensual elements.

That pleasure,
that happiness
that arises owing to the five sensual elements, -
that, Ānanda,
is called "sensual pleasure."

Now, Ānanda, there may be some who aver:

'This is the supreme pleasure and happiness
that beings experience.'

But of that view of theirs
I do not allow.

Why not?

There is, Ānanda, another pleasure,
still more excellent and exquisite than this.

And what is that?

Herein, Ānanda, a brother,
aloof from sensua1ity,
aloof from evil conditions,
enters on the first trance,
which is accompanied by thought directed and sustained,
which is born of solitude,
easeful and zestful,
and abides therein.

This, [152] Ānanda, is another pleasure
still more excellent
still more exquisite
than that one.

There may be some, Ānanda, who aver:

'This is the supreme pleasure and happiness
that beings can experience.'

But of that view of theirs
I do not allow.

Why not?

There is, Ānanda, another pleasure,
still more excellent and exquisite than this.

And what is that?

Herein, Ānanda, a brother,
by the calming down of thought directed and sustained,
enters on the inward calm,
that single-mindedness of will,
apart from thought directed and sustained,
born of mental balance,
zestful and full of ease,
which is the second trance.

This, Ānanda, is a pleasure
still more excellent,
still more exquisite
than that other.

There may be some, Ānanda, who aver:

'This is the supreme pleasure and happiness
that beings can experience.'

But of that view of theirs
I do not allow.

Why not?

There is, Ānanda, another pleasure,
still more excellent and exquisite than this.

And what is that?

Herein, Ānanda, a brother,
by the fading out of zest
becomes balanced
and remains mindful and composed,
and experiences with the body
the happiness of which the Ariyans aver:

'The balanced thoughtful man
dwells happily.'

Then he enters on the third trance
and abides therein.

This, Ānanda, is a pleasure
still more excellent,
still more exquisite
than that other.

There may be some, Ānanda, who aver:

'This is the supreme pleasure and happiness
that beings can experience.'

But of that view of theirs
I do not allow.

Why not?

There is, Ānanda, another pleasure,
still more excellent and exquisite than this.

And what is that?

Herein, Ānanda, a brother,
rejecting pleasure and pain,
by the coming to an end
of the joy and sorrow
which he had before,
enters on
and abides in
the fourth trance,
which is free of pain
and free of pleasure,
but is a state of perfect purity
of balance
and equanimity.

This, Ānanda, is a pleasure
still more excellent,
still more exquisite
than that other.

There may be some, Ānanda, who aver:

'This is the supreme pleasure and happiness
that beings can experience.'

But of that view of theirs
I do not allow.

Why not?

There is, Ānanda, another pleasure,
still more excellent and exquisite than this.

And what is that?

Herein, Ānanda, a brother,
passing utterly beyond the perception of [153] objects,
by the coming to an end
of perception of resistance,[6]
by not attending to perception of diversity,
with the idea of
'infinite[7] is space,'
attains
and abides in
the realm of the infinity of space.

This, Ānanda, is a pleasure
still more excellent,
still more exquisite
than that other.

There may be some, Ānanda, who aver:

'This is the supreme pleasure and happiness
that beings can experience.'

But of that view of theirs
I do not allow.

Why not?

There is, Ānanda, another pleasure,
still more excellent and exquisite than this.

And what is that?

Herein, Ānanda, a brother,
passing utterly beyond the realm of infinite space,
with the idea of
'infinite is consciousness,'
attains
and abides in
the realm of infinite consciousness.

This, Ānanda, is a pleasure
still more excellent,
still more exquisite
than that other.

There may be some, Ānanda, who aver:

'This is the supreme pleasure and happiness
that beings can experience.'

But of that view of theirs
I do not allow.

Why not?

There is, Ānanda, another pleasure,
still more excellent and exquisite than this.

And what is that?

Herein, Ānanda, a brother,
passing utterly beyond the realm of infinite consciousness,
with the idea:
'There is nothing at all,'
attains
and abides in
the realm of nothingness.

This, Ānanda, is a pleasure
still more excellent,
still more exquisite
than that other.

There may be some, Ānanda, who aver:

'This is the supreme pleasure and happiness
that beings can experience.'

But of that view of theirs
I do not allow.

Why not?

There is, Ānanda, another pleasure,
still more excellent and exquisite than this.

And what is that?

Herein, Ānanda, a brother,
passing utterly beyond the realm of nothingness,
attains
and abides in
the realm which neither is nor is not perception.

This, Ānanda, is a pleasure
still more excellent,
still more exquisite
than that other.

There may be some, Ānanda, who aver:

'This is the supreme pleasure and happiness
that beings can experience.'

But of that view of theirs
I do not allow.

Why not?

There is, Ānanda, another [154] pleasure,
still more excellent and exquisite than this.

And what is that?

Herein, Ānanda, a brother,
passing utterly beyond the realm
which neither is nor is not perception,
attains
and abides in
(a state which is)
the cessation of perception and feeling.[8]

This, Ānanda,
is a pleasure
still more excellent,
still more exquisite
(than that other).

But, Ānanda,
there is a possibility
that the Wanderers who hold other views might aver:

'Gotama the recluse spoke
of the cessation of perception and feeling,
and proclaims that as pleasure.

What is the meaning of this
and how is this?'

The Wanderers who hold other views, Ānanda,
should be replied to thus:

'Friends, the Exalted One did not proclaim that
as pleasure in connection with just pleasant feeling:
but wheresoever, friends, pleasure is obtained,
the Exalted One proclaims just that pleasure,
howsoever
and of whatsoever nature,
as pleasure.'"[9]

 


[1] Pañcak' aŋga. According to Comy. the five angāni constituting the tools of a carpenter are vasi-pharasu (adze), nikkhādana (chisel), daṇḍa (measurmg-stick), muggara (gavel), kāḷa-sutta (blackened thread): Western carpenters use a chalked thread. Cf. Mil. P., 413; J.P.T.S., 1884, 76-8: also nāṭī a hollow reed. (Ceylon carpenters use a bambu joint for holding nails, etc., and small tools.)

[2] Cf. supra. §[xxxv] 133. M. i, 396, 447. Here Comy. calls him paṇḍita thera

[3] Cf. infra, xlii, § 24, Santaŋ, Comy. 'Sā pi sant'aṭṭhena paṇīt'aṭṭhena ca sukhan ti vutta nirodho.' for paṇīta see Buddh Psych. Eth., 266 n.

According to SN 4.36.22:
2: painful and pleasant;
3: painful and pleasant and not-painful-but-not pleasant;
5: the forces (indriya) pleasure, pain, bliss, misery and detachment;
6. visual, auditory, olfactory, gustatory, tactile and mental;
18: six relating to blissful thoughts; six relating to painful thoughts; six relating to thoughts of detachment;
36: six blisses of the home-life, six blisses of renunciation, six pains of the home-life, six pains of renunciation, six detachments of the home-life, six detachments of renunciation;
108: thirty-six relating to the past, thirty six relating to the future and thirty-six relating to the present.

In another version, the 3 become 18 when applied to the six senses (as per above); the 18 become 36 when seen from the point of view of one downbound to the world and one letting go of the world (as per SN 4.36.14); the 36 become 108 as per the above.

p.p. explains it all — p.p.

[4] The number ot the khandhas (thirty-six in a threefold way).

[5] Cf. Udān., 67.

[6] Paṭigha (here in its psychological sense) = saññā The resistance offered to outward-going consciousness, by which one becomes aware of something.

[7] Text has anatta in this and the next, para., following the Sinhalese MSS. But nl and it are so similar in Sinhalese script that they are often indistinguishable. Burmese MSS. read ananta and Comy. does not notice the passage, so I translate according to ananta, always used in this stock formula.

[8] Saññā-vedayita-nirodha.

[9] Cf. Buddh. Psych., 119.

 


[ed1] Woodward here has used 'Objects' for all the senses, presumably in error as usually he distinguishes the various objects of the senses as it is found in the Pali.


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