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Saŋyutta Nikāya,
V: MahāVagga
46. Bojjhanga Saŋyutta
X. Appamāda Vaggo

Kindred Sayings on the Limbs of Wisdom
V. The Great Chapter
46. Kindred Sayings on the Limbs of Wisdom
X. Earnestness

Suttas 89-98

Translated by F. L. Woodward
Edited by Mrs. Rhys Davids

Copyright The Pali Text Society
Commercial Rights Reserved
Creative Commons Licence
For details see Terms of Use.

 


 

Sutta 89

Tathāgata

i. Seclusion

[89.1] THUS have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī.

Then the Exalted One addressed the monks,
saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," replied those monks to the Exalted One.

The Exalted One said:

[89.2] "Just as, monks, of all creatures,
whether footless or having two,
four,
or many feet;
whether having forms or formless;
whether conscious or unconscious,
or neither conscious nor unconscious, —
of these the Tathāgata,
the Arahant,
the fully Enlightened One,
is reckoned chief; —
even so, monks,
of all profitable conditions which are rooted in earnestness,
which join together in earnestness, —
of those conditions
earnestness is reckoned chief.

Of the earnest monk
it may be expected
that he will cultivate,
that he will make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

And how, monks,
does a monk who is earnest
cultivate
and make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom?

Herein a monk cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is mindfulness,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is investigation of the Norm,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is energy,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is zest,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is tranquillity,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is concentration,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is equanimity,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest
cultivates
and makes much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

 

§

 

ii. Ending in Restraint of Passion

[89.3] Just as, monks, of all creatures,
whether footless or having two,
four,
or many feet;
whether having forms or formless;
whether conscious or unconscious,
or neither conscious nor unconscious, —
of these the Tathāgata,
the Arahant,
the fully Enlightened One,
is reckoned chief; —
even so, monks,
of all profitable conditions which are rooted in earnestness,
which join together in earnestness, —
of those conditions
earnestness is reckoned chief.

Of the earnest monk
it may be expected
that he will cultivate,
that he will make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

And how, monks,
does a monk who is earnest
cultivate
and make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom?

Herein a monk cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is mindfulness,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivatesthe limb of wisdom
that is investigation of the Norm
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is energy,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is zest,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is tranquillity,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is concentration,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is equanimity,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest
cultivates
and makes much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

 

§

 

iii. Ending in the Deathless

[89.4] Just as, monks, of all creatures,
whether footless or having two,
four,
or many feet;
whether having forms or formless;
whether conscious or unconscious,
or neither conscious nor unconscious, —
of these the Tathāgata,
the Arahant,
the fully Enlightened One,
is reckoned chief; —
even so, monks,
of all profitable conditions which are rooted in earnestness,
which join together in earnestness, —
of those conditions
earnestness is reckoned chief.

Of the earnest monk
it may be expected
that he will cultivate,
that he will make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

And how, monks,
does a monk who is earnest
cultivate
and make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom?

Herein a monk cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is mindfulness,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is investigation of the Norm,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is energy,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is zest,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is tranquillity,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is concentration,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is equanimity,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest
cultivates
and makes much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

 

§

 

iv. Ending in Nibbāna

[89.5] Just as, monks, of all creatures,
whether footless or having two,
four,
or many feet;
whether having forms or formless;
whether conscious or unconscious,
or neither conscious nor unconscious, —
of these the Tathāgata,
the Arahant,
the fully Enlightened One,
is reckoned chief; —
even so, monks,
of all profitable conditions which are rooted in earnestness,
which join together in earnestness, —
of those conditions
earnestness is reckoned chief.

Of the earnest monk
it may be expected
that he will cultivate,
that he will make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

And how, monks,
does a monk who is earnest
cultivate
and make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom?

Herein a monk cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is mindfulness,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is investigation of the Norm,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is energy,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is zest,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is tranquillity,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is concentration,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is equanimity,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest
cultivates
and makes much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

 


 

Sutta 90

The Foot

i. Seclusion

[90.1] THUS have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī.

Then the Exalted One addressed the monks,
saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," replied those monks to the Exalted One.

The Exalted One said:

[90.2] Just as, monks, of all the foot-characteristics
of such creatures as roam about
are joined together in the foot of the elephant,
and as the elephant's foot
in size
is reckoned chief,
even so, monks, of all profitable conditions
which are rooted in earnestness,
which join together in earnestness, —
of those conditions
earnestness is reckoned chief.

Of the earnest monk
it may be expected
that he will cultivate,
that he will make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

And how, monks,
does a monk who is earnest
cultivate
and make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom?

Herein a monk cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is mindfulness,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is investigation of the Norm,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is energy,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is zest,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is tranquillity,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is concentration,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is equanimity,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest
cultivates
and makes much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

 

§

 

ii. Ending in Restraint of Passion

[90.3] Just as, monks, of all the foot-characteristics
of such creatures as roam about
are joined together in the foot of the elephant,
and as the elephant's foot
in size
is reckoned chief,
even so, monks, of all profitable conditions
which are rooted in earnestness,
which join together in earnestness, —
of those conditions
earnestness is reckoned chief.

Of the earnest monk
it may be expected
that he will cultivate,
that he will make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

And how, monks,
does a monk who is earnest
cultivate
and make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom?

Herein a monk cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is mindfulness,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion;

He cultivatesthe limb of wisdom
that is investigation of the Norm
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion;

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is energy,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion;

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is zest,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion;

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is tranquillity,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion;

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is concentration,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion;

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is equanimity,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion;

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest
cultivates
and makes much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

 

§

 

iii. Ending in the Deathless

[90.4] Just as, monks, of all the foot-characteristics
of such creatures as roam about
are joined together in the foot of the elephant,
and as the elephant's foot
in size
is reckoned chief,
even so, monks, of all profitable conditions
which are rooted in earnestness,
which join together in earnestness, —
of those conditions
earnestness is reckoned chief.

Of the earnest monk
it may be expected
that he will cultivate,
that he will make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

And how, monks,
does a monk who is earnest
cultivate
and make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom?

Herein a monk cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is mindfulness,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

He cultivatesthe limb of wisdom
that is investigation of the Norm
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is energy,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is zest,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is tranquillity,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is concentration,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is equanimity,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest
cultivates
and makes much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest cultivates and makes much of the seven limbs of wisdom.

 

§

 

iv. Ending in Nibbāna

[90.5] Just as, monks, of all the foot-characteristics
of such creatures as roam about
are joined together in the foot of the elephant,
and as the elephant's foot
in size
is reckoned chief,
even so, monks, of all profitable conditions
which are rooted in earnestness,
which join together in earnestness, —
of those conditions
earnestness is reckoned chief.

Of the earnest monk
it may be expected
that he will cultivate,
that he will make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

And how, monks,
does a monk who is earnest
cultivate
and make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom?

Herein a monk cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is mindfulness,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is investigation of the Norm,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is energy,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is zest,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is tranquillity,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is concentration,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is equanimity,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest
cultivates
and makes much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

 


 

Sutta 91

The Roof-peak

i. Seclusion

[91.1] THUS have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī.

Then the Exalted One addressed the monks,
saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," replied those monks to the Exalted One.

The Exalted One said:

[91.2] Just as, monks, in a peaked house
all the rafters whatsoever
go together to the roof-peak,
slope to the roof-peak,
are joined together in the roof-peak,
and of them
the peak is reckoned chief, —
even so, monks, of all profitable conditions,
which are rooted in earnestness,
which join together in earnestness, —
of those conditions
earnestness is reckoned chief.

Of the earnest monk
it may be expected
that he will cultivate,
that he will make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

And how, monks,
does a monk who is earnest
cultivate
and make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom?

Herein a monk cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is mindfulness,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is investigation of the Norm,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is energy,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is zest,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is tranquillity,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is concentration,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is equanimity,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest
cultivates
and makes much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

 

§

 

ii. Ending in Restraint of Passion

[91.3] Just as, monks, in a peaked house
all the rafters whatsoever
go together to the roof-peak,
slope to the roof-peak,
are joined together in the roof-peak,
and of them
the peak is reckoned chief, —
even so, monks, of all profitable conditions,
which are rooted in earnestness,
which join together in earnestness, —
of those conditions
earnestness is reckoned chief.

Of the earnest monk
it may be expected
that he will cultivate,
that he will make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

And how, monks,
does a monk who is earnest
cultivate
and make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom?

Herein a monk cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is mindfulness,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivatesthe limb of wisdom
that is investigation of the Norm
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is energy,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is zest,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is tranquillity,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is concentration,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is equanimity,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest
cultivates
and makes much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

 

§

 

iii. Ending in the Deathless

[91.4] Just as, monks, in a peaked house
all the rafters whatsoever
go together to the roof-peak,
slope to the roof-peak,
are joined together in the roof-peak,
and of them
the peak is reckoned chief, —
even so, monks, of all profitable conditions,
which are rooted in earnestness,
which join together in earnestness, —
of those conditions
earnestness is reckoned chief.

Of the earnest monk
it may be expected
that he will cultivate,
that he will make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

And how, monks,
does a monk who is earnest
cultivate
and make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom?

Herein a monk cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is mindfulness,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is investigation of the Norm,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is energy,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is zest,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is tranquillity,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is concentration,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is equanimity,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest
cultivates
and makes much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest cultivates and makes much of the seven limbs of wisdom.

 

§

 

iv. Ending in Nibbāna

[91.5] Just as, monks, in a peaked house
all the rafters whatsoever
go together to the roof-peak,
slope to the roof-peak,
are joined together in the roof-peak,
and of them
the peak is reckoned chief, —
even so, monks, of all profitable conditions,
which are rooted in earnestness,
which join together in earnestness, —
of those conditions
earnestness is reckoned chief.

Of the earnest monk
it may be expected
that he will cultivate,
that he will make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

And how, monks,
does a monk who is earnest
cultivate
and make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom?

Herein a monk cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is mindfulness,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is investigation of the Norm,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is energy,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is zest,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is tranquillity,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is concentration,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is equanimity,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest
cultivates
and makes much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

 


 

Sutta 92

Wood

i. Seclusion

[92.1] THUS have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī.

Then the Exalted One addressed the monks,
saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," replied those monks to the Exalted One.

The Exalted One said:

[92.2] Just as, monks, of all scented woods whatsoever
the dark sandal-wood is reckoned chief, —
even so of all profitable conditions,
which are rooted in earnestness,
which join together in earnestness, —
of those conditions
earnestness is reckoned chief.

Of the earnest monk
it may be expected
that he will cultivate,
that he will make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

And how, monks,
does a monk who is earnest
cultivate
and make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom?

Herein a monk cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is mindfulness,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is investigation of the Norm,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is energy,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is zest,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is tranquillity,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is concentration,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is equanimity,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest
cultivates
and makes much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

 

§

 

ii. Ending in Restraint of Passion

[92.3] Just as, monks, of all scented woods whatsoever
the dark sandal-wood is reckoned chief, —
even so of all profitable conditions,
which are rooted in earnestness,
which join together in earnestness, —
of those conditions
earnestness is reckoned chief.

Of the earnest monk
it may be expected
that he will cultivate,
that he will make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

And how, monks,
does a monk who is earnest
cultivate
and make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom?

Herein a monk cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is mindfulness,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivatesthe limb of wisdom
that is investigation of the Norm
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is energy,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is zest,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is tranquillity,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is concentration,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is equanimity,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest
cultivates
and makes much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

 

§

 

iii. Ending in the Deathless

[92.4] Just as, monks, of all scented woods whatsoever
the dark sandal-wood is reckoned chief, —
even so of all profitable conditions,
which are rooted in earnestness,
which join together in earnestness, —
of those conditions
earnestness is reckoned chief.

Of the earnest monk
it may be expected
that he will cultivate,
that he will make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

And how, monks,
does a monk who is earnest
cultivate
and make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom?

Herein a monk cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is mindfulness,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is investigation of the Norm,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is energy,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is zest,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is tranquillity,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is concentration,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is equanimity,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest
cultivates
and makes much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest cultivates and makes much of the seven limbs of wisdom.

 

§

 

iv. Ending in Nibbāna

[92.5] Just as, monks, of all scented woods whatsoever
the dark sandal-wood is reckoned chief, —
even so of all profitable conditions,
which are rooted in earnestness,
which join together in earnestness, —
of those conditions
earnestness is reckoned chief.

Of the earnest monk
it may be expected
that he will cultivate,
that he will make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

And how, monks,
does a monk who is earnest
cultivate
and make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom?

Herein a monk cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is mindfulness,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is investigation of the Norm,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is energy,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is zest,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is tranquillity,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is concentration,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is equanimity,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest
cultivates
and makes much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

 


 

Sutta 93

Heart-wood

i. Seclusion

[93.1] THUS have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī.

Then the Exalted One addressed the monks,
saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," replied those monks to the Exalted One.

The Exalted One said:

[93.2] Just as, monks, of all scented heart-woods whatsoever
the red saldal-wood is reckoned chief, —
even so, monks, of all profitable conditions,
which are rooted in earnestness,
which join together in earnestness, —
of those conditions
earnestness is reckoned chief.

Of the earnest monk
it may be expected
that he will cultivate,
that he will make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

And how, monks,
does a monk who is earnest
cultivate
and make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom?

Herein a monk cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is mindfulness,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is investigation of the Norm,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is energy,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is zest,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is tranquillity,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is concentration,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is equanimity,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest
cultivates
and makes much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

 

§

 

ii. Ending in Restraint of Passion

[93.3] Just as, monks, of all scented heart-woods whatsoever
the red saldal-wood is reckoned chief, —
even so, monks, of all profitable conditions,
which are rooted in earnestness,
which join together in earnestness, —
of those conditions
earnestness is reckoned chief.

Of the earnest monk
it may be expected
that he will cultivate,
that he will make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

And how, monks,
does a monk who is earnest
cultivate
and make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom?

Herein a monk cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is mindfulness,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivatesthe limb of wisdom
that is investigation of the Norm
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is energy,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is zest,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is tranquillity,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is concentration,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is equanimity,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest
cultivates
and makes much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

 

§

 

iii. Ending in the Deathless

[93.4] Just as, monks, of all scented heart-woods whatsoever
the red saldal-wood is reckoned chief, —
even so, monks, of all profitable conditions,
which are rooted in earnestness,
which join together in earnestness, —
of those conditions
earnestness is reckoned chief.

Of the earnest monk
it may be expected
that he will cultivate,
that he will make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

And how, monks,
does a monk who is earnest
cultivate
and make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom?

Herein a monk cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is mindfulness,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is investigation of the Norm,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is energy,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is zest,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is tranquillity,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is concentration,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is equanimity,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest
cultivates
and makes much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest cultivates and makes much of the seven limbs of wisdom.

 

§

 

iv. Ending in Nibbāna

[93.5] Just as, monks, of all scented heart-woods whatsoever
the red saldal-wood is reckoned chief, —
even so, monks, of all profitable conditions,
which are rooted in earnestness,
which join together in earnestness, —
of those conditions
earnestness is reckoned chief.

Of the earnest monk
it may be expected
that he will cultivate,
that he will make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

And how, monks,
does a monk who is earnest
cultivate
and make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom?

Herein a monk cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is mindfulness,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is investigation of the Norm,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is energy,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is zest,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is tranquillity,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is concentration,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is equanimity,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest
cultivates
and makes much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

 


 

Sutta 94

Jasmine

i. Seclusion

[94.1] THUS have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī.

Then the Exalted One addressed the monks,
saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," replied those monks to the Exalted One.

The Exalted One said:

[94.2] Just as, monks, of all scented flowers whatsoever
the jasmine is reckoned chief,
even so, monks, of all profitable conditions,
which are rooted in earnestness,
which join together in earnestness, —
of those conditions
earnestness is reckoned chief.

Of the earnest monk
it may be expected
that he will cultivate,
that he will make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

And how, monks,
does a monk who is earnest
cultivate
and make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom?

Herein a monk cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is mindfulness,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is investigation of the Norm,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is energy,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is zest,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is tranquillity,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is concentration,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is equanimity,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest
cultivates
and makes much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

 

§

 

ii. Ending in Restraint of Passion

[94.3] Just as, monks, of all scented flowers whatsoever
the jasmine is reckoned chief,
even so, monks, of all profitable conditions,
which are rooted in earnestness,
which join together in earnestness, —
of those conditions
earnestness is reckoned chief.

Of the earnest monk
it may be expected
that he will cultivate,
that he will make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

And how, monks,
does a monk who is earnest
cultivate
and make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom?

Herein a monk cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is mindfulness,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivatesthe limb of wisdom
that is investigation of the Norm
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is energy,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is zest,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is tranquillity,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is concentration,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is equanimity,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest
cultivates
and makes much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

 

§

 

iii. Ending in the Deathless

[94.4] Just as, monks, of all scented flowers whatsoever
the jasmine is reckoned chief,
even so, monks, of all profitable conditions,
which are rooted in earnestness,
which join together in earnestness, —
of those conditions
earnestness is reckoned chief.

Of the earnest monk
it may be expected
that he will cultivate,
that he will make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

And how, monks,
does a monk who is earnest
cultivate
and make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom?

Herein a monk cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is mindfulness,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is investigation of the Norm,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is energy,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is zest,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is tranquillity,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is concentration,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is equanimity,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest
cultivates
and makes much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest cultivates and makes much of the seven limbs of wisdom.

 

§

 

iv. Ending in Nibbāna

[94.5] Just as, monks, of all scented flowers whatsoever
the jasmine is reckoned chief,
even so, monks, of all profitable conditions,
which are rooted in earnestness,
which join together in earnestness, —
of those conditions
earnestness is reckoned chief.

Of the earnest monk
it may be expected
that he will cultivate,
that he will make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

And how, monks,
does a monk who is earnest
cultivate
and make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom?

Herein a monk cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is mindfulness,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is investigation of the Norm,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is energy,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is zest,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is tranquillity,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is concentration,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is equanimity,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest
cultivates
and makes much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

 


 

Sutta 95

Prince

i. Seclusion

[95.1] THUS have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī.

Then the Exalted One addressed the monks,
saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," replied those monks to the Exalted One.

The Exalted One said:

[95.2] Just as, monks, all petty princes whatsoever
follow in the train of the universal monarch,
even so, monks, of all profitable conditions,
which are rooted in earnestness,
which join together in earnestness, —
of those conditions
earnestness is reckoned chief.

Of the earnest monk
it may be expected
that he will cultivate,
that he will make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

And how, monks,
does a monk who is earnest
cultivate
and make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom?

Herein a monk cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is mindfulness,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is investigation of the Norm,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is energy,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is zest,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is tranquillity,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is concentration,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is equanimity,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest
cultivates
and makes much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

 

§

 

ii. Ending in Restraint of Passion

[95.3] Just as, monks, all petty princes whatsoever
follow in the train of the universal monarch,
even so, monks, of all profitable conditions,
which are rooted in earnestness,
which join together in earnestness, —
of those conditions
earnestness is reckoned chief.

Of the earnest monk
it may be expected
that he will cultivate,
that he will make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

And how, monks,
does a monk who is earnest
cultivate
and make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom?

Herein a monk cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is mindfulness,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivatesthe limb of wisdom
that is investigation of the Norm
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is energy,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is zest,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is tranquillity,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is concentration,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is equanimity,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest
cultivates
and makes much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

 

§

 

iii. Ending in the Deathless

[95.4] Just as, monks, all petty princes whatsoever
follow in the train of the universal monarch,
even so, monks, of all profitable conditions,
which are rooted in earnestness,
which join together in earnestness, —
of those conditions
earnestness is reckoned chief.

Of the earnest monk
it may be expected
that he will cultivate,
that he will make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

And how, monks,
does a monk who is earnest
cultivate
and make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom?

Herein a monk cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is mindfulness,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is investigation of the Norm,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is energy,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is zest,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is tranquillity,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is concentration,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is equanimity,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest
cultivates
and makes much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest cultivates and makes much of the seven limbs of wisdom.

 

§

 

iv. Ending in Nibbāna

[95.5] Just as, monks, all petty princes whatsoever
follow in the train of the universal monarch,
even so, monks, of all profitable conditions,
which are rooted in earnestness,
which join together in earnestness, —
of those conditions
earnestness is reckoned chief.

Of the earnest monk
it may be expected
that he will cultivate,
that he will make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

And how, monks,
does a monk who is earnest
cultivate
and make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom?

Herein a monk cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is mindfulness,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is investigation of the Norm,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is energy,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is zest,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is tranquillity,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is concentration,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is equanimity,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest
cultivates
and makes much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

 


 

Sutta 96

Moon

i. Seclusion

[96.1] THUS have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī.

Then the Exalted One addressed the monks,
saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," replied those monks to the Exalted One.

The Exalted One said:

[96.2] Just as, monks, of all starry bodies whatsoever
the radiance does not equal one-sixteenth part
of the radiance of the moon;
just as the moon is reckoned chief of them,
even so, monks, of all profitable conditions,
which are rooted in earnestness,
which join together in earnestness, —
of those conditions
earnestness is reckoned chief.

Of the earnest monk
it may be expected
that he will cultivate,
that he will make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

And how, monks,
does a monk who is earnest
cultivate
and make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom?

Herein a monk cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is mindfulness,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is investigation of the Norm,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is energy,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is zest,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is tranquillity,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is concentration,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is equanimity,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest
cultivates
and makes much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

 

§

 

ii. Ending in Restraint of Passion

[96.3] Just as, monks, of all starry bodies whatsoever
the radiance does not equal one-sixteenth part
of the radiance of the moon;
just as the moon is reckoned chief of them,
even so, monks, of all profitable conditions,
which are rooted in earnestness,
which join together in earnestness, —
of those conditions
earnestness is reckoned chief.

Of the earnest monk
it may be expected
that he will cultivate,
that he will make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

And how, monks,
does a monk who is earnest
cultivate
and make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom?

Herein a monk cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is mindfulness,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivatesthe limb of wisdom
that is investigation of the Norm
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is energy,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is zest,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is tranquillity,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is concentration,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is equanimity,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest
cultivates
and makes much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

 

§

 

iii. Ending in the Deathless

[96.4] Just as, monks, of all starry bodies whatsoever
the radiance does not equal one-sixteenth part
of the radiance of the moon;
just as the moon is reckoned chief of them,
even so, monks, of all profitable conditions,
which are rooted in earnestness,
which join together in earnestness, —
of those conditions
earnestness is reckoned chief.

Of the earnest monk
it may be expected
that he will cultivate,
that he will make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

And how, monks,
does a monk who is earnest
cultivate
and make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom?

Herein a monk cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is mindfulness,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is investigation of the Norm,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is energy,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is zest,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is tranquillity,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is concentration,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is equanimity,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest
cultivates
and makes much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest cultivates and makes much of the seven limbs of wisdom.

 

§

 

iv. Ending in Nibbāna

[96.5] Just as, monks, of all starry bodies whatsoever
the radiance does not equal one-sixteenth part
of the radiance of the moon;
just as the moon is reckoned chief of them,
even so, monks, of all profitable conditions,
which are rooted in earnestness,
which join together in earnestness, —
of those conditions
earnestness is reckoned chief.

Of the earnest monk
it may be expected
that he will cultivate,
that he will make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

And how, monks,
does a monk who is earnest
cultivate
and make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom?

Herein a monk cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is mindfulness,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is investigation of the Norm,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is energy,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is zest,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is tranquillity,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is concentration,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is equanimity,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest
cultivates
and makes much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

 


 

Sutta 97

Sun

i. Seclusion

[97.1] THUS have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī.

Then the Exalted One addressed the monks,
saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," replied those monks to the Exalted One.

The Exalted One said:

[97.2] Just as, monks, in the autumn season,
when the sky is opened up
and cleared of clouds,
the sun,
leaping up into the firmament,
drives away all darkness,
and shines
and burns
and flashes forth,
even so, monks, of all profitable conditions,
which are rooted in earnestness,
which join together in earnestness, —
of those conditions
earnestness is reckoned chief.

Of the earnest monk
it may be expected
that he will cultivate,
that he will make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

And how, monks,
does a monk who is earnest
cultivate
and make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom?

Herein a monk cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is mindfulness,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is investigation of the Norm,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is energy,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is zest,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is tranquillity,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is concentration,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is equanimity,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest
cultivates
and makes much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

 

§

 

ii. Ending in Restraint of Passion

[97.3] Just as, monks, in the autumn season,
when the sky is opened up
and cleared of clouds,
the sun,
leaping up into the firmament,
drives away all darkness,
and shines
and burns
and flashes forth,
even so, monks, of all profitable conditions,
which are rooted in earnestness,
which join together in earnestness, —
of those conditions
earnestness is reckoned chief.

Of the earnest monk
it may be expected
that he will cultivate,
that he will make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

And how, monks,
does a monk who is earnest
cultivate
and make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom?

Herein a monk cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is mindfulness,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivatesthe limb of wisdom
that is investigation of the Norm
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is energy,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is zest,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is tranquillity,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is concentration,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is equanimity,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest
cultivates
and makes much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

 

§

 

iii. Ending in the Deathless

[97.4] Just as, monks, in the autumn season,
when the sky is opened up
and cleared of clouds,
the sun,
leaping up into the firmament,
drives away all darkness,
and shines
and burns
and flashes forth,
even so, monks, of all profitable conditions,
which are rooted in earnestness,
which join together in earnestness, —
of those conditions
earnestness is reckoned chief.

Of the earnest monk
it may be expected
that he will cultivate,
that he will make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

And how, monks,
does a monk who is earnest
cultivate
and make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom?

Herein a monk cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is mindfulness,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is investigation of the Norm,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is energy,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is zest,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is tranquillity,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is concentration,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is equanimity,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest
cultivates
and makes much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest cultivates and makes much of the seven limbs of wisdom.

 

§

 

iv. Ending in Nibbāna

[97.5] Just as, monks, in the autumn season,
when the sky is opened up
and cleared of clouds,
the sun,
leaping up into the firmament,
drives away all darkness,
and shines
and burns
and flashes forth,
even so, monks, of all profitable conditions,
which are rooted in earnestness,
which join together in earnestness, —
of those conditions
earnestness is reckoned chief.

Of the earnest monk
it may be expected
that he will cultivate,
that he will make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

And how, monks,
does a monk who is earnest
cultivate
and make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom?

Herein a monk cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is mindfulness,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is investigation of the Norm,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is energy,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is zest,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is tranquillity,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is concentration,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is equanimity,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest
cultivates
and makes much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

 


 

Sutta 98

Cloth

i. Seclusion

[98.1] THUS have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī.

Then the Exalted One addressed the monks,
saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," replied those monks to the Exalted One.

The Exalted One said:

[98.2] Just as, monks, of all woven cloths whatsoever
the cloth of Benares is reckoned chief,
even so, monks, of all profitable conditions,
which are rooted in earnestness,
which join together in earnestness, —
of those conditions
earnestness is reckoned chief.

Of the earnest monk
it may be expected
that he will cultivate,
that he will make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

And how, monks,
does a monk who is earnest
cultivate
and make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom?

Herein a monk cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is mindfulness,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is investigation of the Norm,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is energy,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is zest,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is tranquillity,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is concentration,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is equanimity,
which is based on seclusion,
on dispassion,
on cessation,
which ends in self-surrender.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest
cultivates
and makes much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

 

§

 

ii. Ending in Restraint of Passion

[98.3] Just as, monks, of all woven cloths whatsoever
the cloth of Benares is reckoned chief,
even so, monks, of all profitable conditions,
which are rooted in earnestness,
which join together in earnestness, —
of those conditions
earnestness is reckoned chief.

Of the earnest monk
it may be expected
that he will cultivate,
that he will make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

And how, monks,
does a monk who is earnest
cultivate
and make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom?

Herein a monk cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is mindfulness,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivatesthe limb of wisdom
that is investigation of the Norm
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is energy,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is zest,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is tranquillity,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is concentration,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

He cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is equanimity,
which ends in the restraint of passion,
which ends in the restraint of hatred,
which ends in the restraint of illusion.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest
cultivates
and makes much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

 

§

 

iii. Ending in the Deathless

[98.4] Just as, monks, of all woven cloths whatsoever
the cloth of Benares is reckoned chief,
even so, monks, of all profitable conditions,
which are rooted in earnestness,
which join together in earnestness, —
of those conditions
earnestness is reckoned chief.

Of the earnest monk
it may be expected
that he will cultivate,
that he will make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

And how, monks,
does a monk who is earnest
cultivate
and make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom?

Herein a monk cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is mindfulness,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is investigation of the Norm,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is energy,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is zest,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is tranquillity,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is concentration,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is equanimity,
which plunges into the deathless,
which has the deathless for its aim,
which has the deathless for its end.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest
cultivates
and makes much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest cultivates and makes much of the seven limbs of wisdom.

 

§

 

iv. Ending in Nibbāna

[98.5] Just as, monks, of all woven cloths whatsoever
the cloth of Benares is reckoned chief,
even so, monks, of all profitable conditions,
which are rooted in earnestness,
which join together in earnestness, —
of those conditions
earnestness is reckoned chief.

Of the earnest monk
it may be expected
that he will cultivate,
that he will make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.

And how, monks,
does a monk who is earnest
cultivate
and make much of
the seven limbs of wisdom?

Herein a monk cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is mindfulness,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is investigation of the Norm,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is energy,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is zest,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is tranquillity,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is concentration,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna;

he cultivates the limb of wisdom
that is equanimity,
which flows to Nibbāna,
which slides to Nibbāna,
which tends to Nibbāna.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest
cultivates
and makes much of
the seven limbs of wisdom.


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