Samyutta Nikaya Masthead


[Home]  [Sutta Indexes]  [Glossology]  [Site Sub-Sections]


 

Saɱyutta Nikāya,
V: Mahā-Vagga
47. Satipaṭṭhana Saɱyutta
4. Anussuta-Vagga

The Book of the Kindred Sayings
The Great Chapter,
47: Kindred Sayings on the Stations of Mindfulness
Chapter IV: Unheard Before

Sutta 40

Vibhaŋga Suttaɱ

Analysis

Translated by F. L. Woodward

Copyright The Pali Text Society
Commercial Rights Reserved
Creative Commons Licence
For details see Terms of Use.

 


 

[1][bodh][than] THUS have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī,
at Jeta Grove,
in Anāthapiṇḍika's Park.

Then the Exalted One addressed the monks,
saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," replied those monks to the Exalted One.

The Exalted One said:

I will teach you, monks,
a station of mindfulness,[ed1]
the cultivation of
a station of mindfulness,
and the practice leading to the cultivation of
a station of mindfulness.

Do ye listen to it.

And what, monks, is a station of mindfulness?

Herein a monk abides in body contemplating body
(as transient),
ardent,
composed
and mindful,
having restrained the dejection in the world
arising from coveting.

He dwells as regards feelings contemplating feelings
(as transient),
ardent,
composed
and mindful,
having restrained the dejection in the world
arising from coveting.

He dwells as regards mind contemplating mind
(as transient),
ardent,
composed
and mindful,
having restrained the dejection in the world
arising from coveting.

He dwells as regards mind-states contemplating mind-states
(as transient),
ardent,
composed
and mindful,
having restrained the dejection in the world
arising from coveting.

This, monks, is called
'a station of mindfulness.'

 


 

And of what sort, monks,
is the cultivation of a station of mindfulness?

Herein a monk dwells contemplating the rise of things[1] in body.

He so dwells contemplating the fall of things[2] in body.

He dwells contemplating both the rise and the fall of things in body,
ardent,
composed
and mindful,
having restrained the dejection in the world
arising from coveting.

Herein a monk dwells contemplating the rise of things in feelings.

He so dwells contemplating the fall of things in feelings.

He dwells contemplating both the rise and the fall of things in feelings,
ardent,
composed
and mindful,
having restrained the dejection in the world
arising from coveting.

Herein a monk dwells contemplating the rise of things in mind.

He so dwells contemplating the fall of things in mind.

He dwells contemplating both the rise and the fall of things in mind,
ardent,
composed
and mindful,
having restrained the dejection in the world
arising from coveting.

Herein a monk dwells contemplating the rise of things in mind-states.

He so dwells contemplating the fall of things in mind-states.

He dwells contemplating both the rise and the fall of things in mind-states,
ardent,
composed
and mindful,
having restrained the dejection in the world
arising from coveting.

This, monks, is called
'the cultivation of a station of mindfulness.'

 


 

And of what sort, monks,
is the practice leading to
the cultivation of a station of mindfulness?

It is just this Ariyan eightfold way,
to wit:

Right view
right aim,
right speech,
right action,
right living,
right effort,
right mindfulness,
right concentration.

This, monks, is called
the practice leading to
the cultivation of a station of mindfulness.

 


[1] Samudaya-dhammā.

[2] Vaya-dhammā, Cf. Dhp. 113.

 


[ed1] Woodward's translation of '-paṭṭhāna' as 'stations' breaks down here where the use is put into the singular. Woodward inserts 'The Four' here, but below uses 'a station' which is very awkward when it deals with the four together. I have changed it here to the singlular for internal consistency and consistency with the Pali. Bhk. Bodhi translates 'establishment'. Since '-paṭṭhāna' can also be understood in the sense of 'pasture' (resort or establishment as in residence, or alternatively as basis of nourishment) which would face the same issues, if 'station' or 'pasture' or 'resort' or the like is for some reason preferred, the solution would be to set up the sutta so that the whole sequence was repeated four times, once for each of the 'stations'.


Contact:
E-mail
Copyright Statement