Samyutta Nikaya Masthead


[Home]  [Sutta Indexes]  [Glossology]  [Site Sub-Sections]


 

Saɱyutta Nikāya,
V: Mahā Vagga
52. Anuruddha Saɱyutta
I. Rahogata Vagga

The Book of the Kindred Sayings
V. The Great Chapter
52. Kindred Sayings about Anuruddha
Chapter I: In Solitude

Suttas 4-6

Translated by F. L. Woodward
Edited by Mrs. Rhys Davids

Copyright The Pali Text Society
Commercial Rights Reserved
Creative Commons Licence
For details see Terms of Use.

 


 

Sutta 4

Paṭhama Kaṇṭakī Suttaɱ

Cactus Grove (a)

[4.1][olds] THUS have I heard:

On a certain occasion the venerable Anuruddha, Sāriputta and Moggallāna the Great were staying at Sāketa, in Cactus Grove.[1]

Then the venerable Sāriputta
and Moggallāna the Great,
rising at eventide from their solitude,
went to visit the venerable Anuruddha,
and on coming to him
greeted him courteously,
and after the exchange of greetings and courtesies
sat down at one side.

As they thus sat
the venerable Sāriputta said this
to the venerable Anuruddha:

[265] "Friend Anuruddha,
what states should be abandoned
by a monk who is a pupil,
after he has attained them?"

"Friend Sāriputta,
the four arisings of mindfulness
should be abandoned
by a monk who is a pupil,
after he has attained them.

What four?

Herein, friend, a monk dwells in body contemplating body
(as transient),
ardent,
self-possessed
and mindful,
by restraining the dejection in the world
that arises from coveting.

So also, friend, a monk dwells in feelings contemplating feelings
(as transient),
ardent,
self-possessed
and mindful,
by restraining the dejection in the world
that arises from coveting.

So also, friend, a monk dwells in mind contemplating mind
(as transient),
ardent,
self-possessed
and mindful,
by restraining the dejection in the world
that arises from coveting.

So also, friend, a monk dwells in mind-states contemplating mind-states
(as transient),
ardent,
self-possessed
and mindful,
by restraining the dejection in the world
that arises from coveting.

By a monk who is a pupil, friend Sāriputta,
these four arisings of mindfulness
should be abandoned
after he has attained them."

 


 

Sutta 5

Dutiya Kaṇṭakī Suttaɱ

Cactus Grove (b)

[5.1][olds] THUS have I heard:

On a certain occasion the venerable Anuruddha, Sāriputta and Moggallāna the Great were staying at Sāketa, in Cactus Grove.

Then the venerable Sāriputta
and Moggallāna the Great,
rising at eventide from their solitude,
went to visit the venerable Anuruddha,
and on coming to him
greeted him courteously,
and after the exchange of greetings and courtesies
sat down at one side.

As they thus sat
the venerable Sāriputta said this
to the venerable Anuruddha:

"Friend Anuruddha,
what states should be abandoned
by a monk who is an adept,
after he has attained them?"[ed1]

"Friend Sāriputta,
the four arisings of mindfulness
should be abandoned
by a monk who is an adept,
after he has attained them.

What four?

Herein, friend, a monk dwells in body contemplating body
(as transient),
ardent,
self-possessed
and mindful,
by restraining the dejection in the world
that arises from coveting.

So also, friend, a monk dwells in feelings contemplating feelings
(as transient),
ardent,
self-possessed
and mindful,
by restraining the dejection in the world
that arises from coveting.

So also, friend, a monk dwells in mind contemplating mind
(as transient),
ardent,
self-possessed
and mindful,
by restraining the dejection in the world
that arises from coveting.

So also, friend, a monk dwells in mind-states contemplating mind-states
(as transient),
ardent,
self-possessed
and mindful,
by restraining the dejection in the world
that arises from coveting.

By a monk who is an adept, friend Sāriputta,
these four arisings of mindfulness
should be abandoned
after he has attained them."

 


 

Sutta 6

Tatiya Kaṇṭakī Suttaɱ

Cactus Grove (c)

[6.1][olds] THUS have I heard:

On a certain occasion the venerable Anuruddha, Sāriputta and Moggallāna the Great were staying at Sāketa, in Cactus Grove.

Then the venerable Sāriputta
and Moggallāna the Great,
rising at eventide from their solitude,
went to visit the venerable Anuruddha,
and on coming to him
greeted him courteously,
and after the exchange of greetings and courtesies
sat down at one side.

As they thus sat
the venerable Sāriputta said this
to the venerable Anuruddha:

"Friend Anuruddha,
by cultivating
and making much of what conditions
have you come by such mighty magic power and majesty?"

"Friend, it is by cultivating
and making much of
four arisings of mindfulness
that I have done so.

What four?

Herein, friend, I dwell in body contemplating body
(as transient),
ardent,
self-possessed
and mindful,
by restraining the dejection in the world
that arises from coveting.

So also, friend, I dwell in feelings contemplating feelings
(as transient),
ardent,
self-possessed
and mindful,
by restraining the dejection in the world
that arises from coveting.

I dwell in mind contemplating mind
(as transient),
ardent,
self-possessed
and mindful,
by restraining the dejection in the world
that arises from coveting.

I dwell in mind-states contemplating mind-states
(as transient),
ardent,
self-possessed
and mindful,
by restraining the dejection in the world
that arises from coveting.

It is by cultivating
and making much of
these four arisings of mindfulness, friend,
that I have come by mighty magic power and majesty.

Moreover, friend, it is by cultivating
and making much of
these four arisings of mindfulness,
that I have come to comprehend
the thousandfold world-system."

 


[1] Kaṇtakī-vana, supra, text, 174. Comy. (reading Tikaṇṭakī-, calls it mahā karamadda-vana, which, according to Childers, is Carissa carandas, a sort of shrub). Cf. supra, 176, infra, 303 of text.

 


[ed1] Woodward changes the phrasing here slightly: "Friend, Anuruddha, by a monk who is an adept what states should be abandoned ..." I have retained his original wording to parallel the Pali.


Contact:
E-mail
Copyright Statement