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Saŋyutta Nikāya,
V: Mahā Vagga
52. Anuruddha Saŋyutta
I. Rahogata Vagga

The Book of the Kindred Sayings
V. The Great Chapter
52. Kindred Sayings about Anuruddha
Chapter I: In Solitude

Sutta 8

Salalāgāra Suttaṃ

Sāl-tree Hut

Translated by F. L. Woodward
Edited by Mrs. Rhys Davids

Copyright The Pali Text Society
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[1] THUS have I heard:

Once the venerable Anuruddha was staying near Sāvatthī at Sāl-tree Hut.[1]

Then the venerable Anuruddha addressed the monks,
saying:

'Friends, take the case of the river Ganges
which flows to the east,
slides to the east,
tends to the east.

Then there comes a great crowd of folk
with pick and basket
saying:

"We will make this river Ganges
flow,
slide
and tend to the west."

Now what think ye, friends?

Could that great crowd of folk
make the river Ganges
flow,
slide
and tend to the west?'[2]

'Surely not, friend.

And why not?

It is because, as the river Ganges
flows,
slides
and tends to the east,
it were no easy thing
to make it flow
slide
tend to the west:
insomuch that fatigue and vexation
would be the lot
of that great crowd of folk.'

'Just so, friends,
in the case of a monk
who is cultivating the four arisings of mindfulness
and making much of them,
suppose the rajah's royal ministers
or his friends
or boon-companions
or kinsmen
or blood-relations
were to come to [267] that monk
and tempt him
with the offer of wealth,[3]
saying:

"Come, good man!

Why should these yellow robes torment you?

Why parade about
with shaven crown and bowl?

Come!
Return to the lower life,
enjoy possessions
and do deeds of merit."

But, friends, for that monk,
who is cultivating
and making much of
the four arisings of mindfulness,
to reject the training
and return to the lower life
were a thing impossible.

Why so?

Because, friends,
as that monk's heart has
for many a long day
been flowing,
sliding,
tending to seclusion,
for him to return to the lower life
were a thing impossible.

And how, friends,
does a monk cultivate,
make much of,
the four arisings of mindfulness?

Herein, friends,
a monk dwells in body contemplating body
(as transient),
being ardent,
self-possessed
and mindful,
by restraining the dejection in the world
that arises from coveting;

contemplating feelings in feelings
(as transient),
being ardent,
self-possessed
and mindful,
by restraining the dejection in the world
that arises from coveting;

contemplating mind in mind
(as transient),
being ardent,
self-possessed
and mindful,
by restraining the dejection in the world
that arises from coveting;

contemplating mind-states in mind-states (as transient),
(as transient),
being ardent,
self-possessed
and mindful,
by restraining the dejection in the world
that arises from coveting.

That, friends, is how a monk cultivates, makes much of the four arisings of mindfulness.'

 


[1] Salaḷāgāre. Comy. 'in a leaf-hut made of a sāl-tree, with a sāl-tree standing at the door. Hence the name.' Cf. JA. v, 430 - Mil. Panh. (trans.) ii, 224, where Rhys Davids says it is Sal or Hal = Shorea robusta.

[2] K.S. iv, 124; S. iv, 191.

[3] Lit. 'should offer by bringing up.' Abhihaṭṭhuṃ is ger. of abhihaṃsati. Pāli Dict. refs, to Vinaya Texts, ii, 440 n.


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