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Saɱyutta Nikāya:
V. Mahā Vagga
54. Ānāpāna Saɱyutta

Kindred Sayings About
In-Breathing and Out-Breathing

1. Ekadhammavaggo

Book 1: The One Condition

Sutta 8

Dīpo Sutta

The lamp

Translated by F. L. Woodward
Edited by Mrs. Rhys Davids

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[1][bodh][olds][than] THUS have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī at Jeta Grove, in Anāthapiṇḍika's Park.

The Exalted One said:

"Monks, intent concentration on in-breathing and out-breathing, if cultivated and made much of, is of great fruit, of great profit. And how cultivated and made much of is it of great fruit and great profit?

In this method, a monk who goes to a forest or the root of a tree, or a lonely place, sits down cross-legged... (as before). He knows: A long breath I draw in. He knows: A long breath I breathe out. He knows: A short breath I draw in. He knows: A short breath I breathe out.... He makes up his mind (repeating): "Contemplating renunciation I shall breathe out."

"Thus cultivated, thus made much of, the intent concentration on in-breathing and out-breathing is of great fruit, of great profit.

Formerly, monks, before I myself was enlightened with the perfect wisdom, and was yet a Bodhisattva, I used generally to spend my time in this way of living. As I generally lived in this way, neither my body nor my eyes were fatigued,[15] and my mind was freed from the āsavas.

Wherefore, monks, if a monk should desire: May neither my body nor my eyes be fatigued, and by not clinging may my mind be freed from the āsavas, — he must give strict attention to this same intent concentration on in-breathing and out-breathing.

Wherefore, monks, if a monk should desire: Whatsoever memories and plans I have, attached to the worldly life,[16] may they be abandoned, — he must give strict attention to this same intent concentration... .

Wherefore, monks, if a monk should desire: May I dwell conscious of repugnance for what is not repugnant ... May I dwell unconscious of repugnance for what is repugnant ... May I dwell conscious of repugnance both for what is not repugnant and for what is ... Both for what is repugnant and what is not, may I dwell unconscious of repugnance, — he must do likewise.

If he should desire: Rejecting alike what is non-repugnant and what is repugnant, may I dwell indifferent, mindful and composed, — he must do likewise.

If he should desire: Aloof from sensuality, aloof from evil conditions, having entered on the first trance, which is accompanied by thought directed and sustained, that is born of seclusion, zestful and easeful, may I abide therein, — he must do likewise.

If he should desire: By the calming down of thought directed and sustained, entering on that inward calm, that onepointedness of mind apart from thought directed and sustained, that is born of mental balance, zestful and easeful, which is the second trance, may I abide therein, — he must do likewise.

If he should desire: By the fading out of zest may I dwell indifferent, mindful and composed: entering on the third trance, which the Ariyans describe thus: — "He who is indifferent and mindful dwells happily," — he must do likewise.

If he should desire: By the abandoning of ease, by the abandoning of discomfort, by the ending of the happiness and unhappiness which I had before, having entered on that state which is neither pleasant nor painful, that utter purity of mindfulness reached by indifference, the fourth trance, may I abide therein, — he must do likewise.

If he should desire: Passing utterly beyond all consciousness of object, by ending the consciousness of reaction, by disregarding consciousness of diversity, thinking "infinite is space,"may I attain and abide in the sphere of infinite space, — he must do likewise.

If he should desire: Passing utterly beyond the sphere of the infinity of space, reaching the sphere of infinite consciousness, thinking "infinite is consciousness," may I abide therein, — he must do likewise.

If he should desire: Passing utterly beyond the sphere of infinite consciousness, thinking "there is nothing at all," reaching the sphere of nothingness may I abide therein, — he must do likewise.

If he should desire: Passing utterly beyond the sphere of nothingness, and reaching the sphere of neither consciousness nor unconsciousness, let me abide therein, — he must give strict attention to this same intent concentration on in-breathing and out-breathing.

Lastly, if a monk should desire: Passing utterly beyond the sphere of neither consciousness nor unconsciousness, reaching the ceasing of consciousness and sensation, let me so abide, — he must give strict attention to this same intent concentration on in-breathing and out-breathing.

Now, monks, if intent concentration of this sort be cultivated and made much of, when he feels a pleasant feeling he understands: That is impermanent. He understands: I do not cling to it. He understands: It has no lure for me.[17]

If he feels a painful feeling he understands likewise.

So also if he feels a feeling that is neutral.

If he feels a pleasant feeling, he feels it as one released from bondage to it. So also, if he feels a painful feeling and a neutral feeling, he feels them as one released from bondage to them.

If he has a feeling that his bodily endurance has reached its limit, he is aware that he so feels. When he has a feeling that life has reached its limit, he is aware that he feels so. He understands: When body breaks up, after life is used up, all my experiences in this world will lose their lure and grow cold.[18]

Just as, monks, because of oil and because of a wick a lamp keeps burning; but if oil and wick be used up the lamp would go out, because it is not fed, — even so, monks, when one has a feeling that his bodily endurance has reached its limit, that life has reached its limit; when he has a feeling that when body breaks up, after life is used up, all his experiences in this world will lose their lure and grow cold, — then indeed a monk is aware that he so feels.'

 


[15]Comy. 'In some other exercises (kammaṭṭhānesu) the body is tired and the eyesight afflicted.' He may here refer to the usual exercises of hatha-yoga, such as, unnatural postures, staring at a bright object or retaining the breath, etc.

[16]Geha-sita-sara-saŋkappā. With the refrain: If, etc., cf. M. No.3.

[17]Cf. K.S. iv, 143.

[18]Cf. S. ii, 83.


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