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Saɱyutta Nikāya
5. Mahā-Vagga
55. Sot'Āpatti Saɱyutta
1. Veḷu-Dvāra Vagga

The Book of the Kindred Sayings
5. The Great Chapter
55. Kindred Sayings on Streamwinning
1. Veḷudvāra

Sutta 8

Paṭhama Giñjakā-Vasatha Suttaɱ

Brick Hall (a)

Translated by F. L. Woodward
Edited by Mrs. Rhys Davids

Copyright The Pali Text Society
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[311]

[1] THUS have I heard:

On a certain occasion the Exalted One was staying at Ñatika,[1]
in Brick Hall.

Now on that occasion the venerable Ānanda came to see the Exalted One
on coming to him greeted him courteously,
and after the exchange of greetings and compliments
sat down at one side.

Seated at one side he said to the Exalted One:

[312] "Lord, the monk named Sāḷha bas made an end.[2]

What is his lot?

What is his destiny in the life to come?

Lord, the nun named Nandā has made an end.

What is her lot?

What is her destiny in the life to come?

Lord, Sudatta, the lay-disciple has made an end.

What is his lot?

What is his destiny in the life to come?

Lord, Sujata,[3] the lay-woman disciple has made an end.

What is her lot?

What is her destiny in the life to come?"

"The monk Sāḷha, Ānanda,
who has made an end,
by destroying the āsavas,
in this very life,
by his own understanding
realized the heart's release,
the release by insight,
and attaining to it
dwelt therein.

"(in the Pure Abodes)." Not necessarily.

p.p. explains it all — p.p.

Nandā the nun, Ānanda,
who has made an end,
by wearing out the five fetters of the lower sort,
has taken birth spontaneously
(in the Pure Abodes),
there to pass away,
destined never to return thence.

Sudatta, the lay-disciple, Ānanda,
who has made an end,
by destroying three fetters[4]
and by weakening those of lust,
hatred
and delusion,
is a once-returner:
coming back to this world just once more
he will make an end of ill.

Sujātā, the lay-woman disciple, Ānanda,
who has made an end,
by destroying three fetters,
is a stream-winner,
not doomed to the Downfall,
assured,
bound for enlightenment.

Indeed, Ānanda,
it is no wonder
that a human being should make an end.

But if, when each one dies,
you come and ask me about the matter,
it is troublesome to the Tathāgata.

Wherefore, Ānanda, I wi11 teach you a Norm-teaching
called 'The Mirror of the Norm,'[5]
possessing which
the Ariyan disciple may,
if he please,
himself proclaim of himself
thus:

'Cut off for me is Purgatory,
cut off is rebirth in an animal womb,
cut off is the realm of ghosts,
the Woeful Way and the Downfall.

Stream-winner am I,
not doomed to the Downfall,
assured,
one bound for enlightenment!'

[313] And of what sort, Ānanda,
is that Norm-teaching
called 'Mirror of the Norm,'
possessed of which
the Ariyan disciple may,
if he please,
himself proclaim of himself
thus:

'Cut off for me is Purgatory,
cut off is rebirth in an animal womb,
cut off is the realm of ghosts,
the Woeful Way and the Downfall.

Stream-winner am I,
not doomed to the Downfall,
assured,
one bound for enlightenment!'?

Herein, Ānanda, the Ariyan disciple is blessed
with unwavering loyalty to the Buddha,
thus:

'He it is the Exalted One,
Arahant,
a fully Enlightened One,
perfect in knowledge and practice,
a Happy One,
world-knower,
unsurpassed charioteer
of men to be tamed,
teacher of devas and mankind,
a Buddha,
an Exalted One.'

He is blessed
with unwavering loyalty to the Norm,
thus:

'Well proclaimed by the Exalted One
is the Norm,
seen in this very life,
a thing not involving time,
inviting one to come and see,
leading onward,
to be known for themselves
by the wise.'

He is blessed
with unwavering loyalty to the Order,
thus:

'Walking righteously is the Exalted One's Order,
walking uprightly,
walking in the right way,
walking dutifully
is the Exalted One's Order of Disciples:
namely,
the four pairs of men,
the eight sorts of men.

That is the Exalted One's Order of Disciples.

Worthy of honour are they,
worthy of reverence,
worthy of offerings,
worthy of salutations with clasped hands, -
a field of merit unsurpassed for the world.'

He is blessed
with the virtues dear to the Ariyans,
virtues unbroken,
whole,
unspotted,
untarnished,
giving freedom,
praised by the wise:
virtues untainted (by craving or delusion),
which lead to concentration of the mind.'

This, Ānanda, is that Norm-teaching
called 'Mirror of the Norm,' possessed of which which
the Ariyan disciple may,
if he please,
himself proclaim of himself
thus:

'Cut off for me is Purgatory,
cut off is rebirth in an animal womb,
cut off is the realm of ghosts,
the Woeful Way and the Downfall.

Stream-winner am I,
not doomed to the Downfall,
assured,
one bound for enlightenment!'"

 


[1] Cf. Dialog. ii, 97 n., where it is called Nādika (of the Nādikas); K.S. ii, 50 n., iv, 55. Text and Comy. read Ñātika ('the village of two kinsmen,' Cūlapāti and Mahñpīti). Brick Hall was what we should call a 'rest-house,' or 'dāk-bungalow.'

"dense". Or maybe not. This sutta deals with how a stream-winner may determine this condition for himself. It does not deal with the curiosity of others.

p.p. explains it all — p.p.

[2] For the same events and persons cf. D. ii, 91; Dialog. ii, 98. The other names of D. ii occur in the next Sutta. All three Suttas (viii-x) should here form one as in D., otherwise we must suppose Ānanda to have been very dense or importunate in troubling the Master on two further occasions with the same question. Cf. Gotama the Man, p. 167.

[3] Dialog. spells Sugatā.

[4] I.e, the first three.

[5] Dhammādāsaŋ. Comy. dhamma-mayaŋ ādāsaŋ.


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