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Saŋyutta Nikāya,
V: MahāVagga
56. Sacca Saŋyutta
VI. Abhisamaya Vagga

The Book of the Kindred Sayings
Part V: The Great Chapter
56: Kindred Sayings about the Truths
VI. Comprehension

Sutta 53

Paṭhama Sambejja Suttaṃ

Confluence (a)

Translated by F. L. Woodward

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[1] THUS have I heard:

Then the Exalted One addressed the monks,
saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," replied those monks to the Exalted One.

The Exalted One said:

"Suppose, monks, that where these great rivers,
to wit:
Ganges,
Yamunā,
Aciravatī,
Sarabhū
and Mahī

flow together,
meet together,
a man draws two or three drops of water.

Now what think ye, monks?

Which is the more,
those two or three drops of water
thus drawn up or the water at the confluence?"

"Why, lord, this is the more,
the water at the confluence.

Exceeding small are the two or three drops of water drawn up:
they cannot be reckoned,
they cannot be compared therewith.

They do not amount to the merest fraction
of a part of the water at the confluence, -
these two or three drops of water thus drawn up."

"Well, just so, monks,
for the Ariyan disciple who is blessed with vision,
for the person who has understanding,
far greater is this Ill which he has destroyed,
which he has used up,
and infinitely small
is that Ill which remains.

It cannot be reckoned,
cannot be compared therewith.

It does not come to the merest fraction
of a part of it
when set beside that Ill
which he has destroyed,
which he has used up, -
that is, it is just a period of seven lives at most
for the man who understands,
as it really is:
the meaning of:
'this is Ill'
who understands,
as it really is:
the meaning of:
'this is the arising of Ill'
who understands,
as it really is:
the meaning of:
'this is the ceasing of Ill'
who understands,
as it really is:
the meaning of:
'this is the practice that leads to the ceasing of Ill.'

Wherefore, monk, an effort must be made to realize:

'This is Ill'.

'This is the arising of Ill.'

'This is the ceasing of Ill.'

This is the practice that leads to the ceasing of Ill.'"


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