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Sacred Books of the Buddhists
The Book of the Discipline,
Volume V Cullavagga
Khandhaka IX. On Suspending the Pātimokkha
Chapter 5.

Translated by I.B. Horner, M.A.,
Associate of Newham College, Cambridge

Copyright The Pali Text Society
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[sbe]"Lord, if a monk is reproving,[1] willing to reprove another, when he has considered how many states within himself may he reprove the other?"

[346] "Upāli, if a monk is reproving, willing to reprove another, when he has considered five states within himself may he reprove the other.

Upāli, when a monk is reproving, willing to reprove another, he should consider thus:

'Now, am I quite pure in bodily conduct,[2] am I possessed of pure bodily conduct, flawless, faultless?

Is this state found in me, or not?

'If, Upāli, this monk is not quite pure in bodily conduct, is not possessed of bodily conduct that is quite pure, flawless, faultless, there will be those who will say to him:

'Please do you, venerable one, train yourself as to body' — thus will those say to him.

"And again, Upāli, if a monk is reproving, willing to reprove another, he should consider thus:

'Now, am I quite pure in the conduct of speech, am I possessed of conduct in speech that is quite pure, flawless, faultless?

Is this state found in me, or not?

'If, Upāli, that monk is not quite pure in the conduct of speech ....

'Please do you, venerable one, train yourself as to speech ' — thus will those say to him.

"And again, Upāli, if a monk is reproving, willing to reprove another, he should consider thus:

"Now is a mind of loving­kindness, without malice towards my fellow Brahma-farers, established in me?

Is this state found in me, or not?

'If, Upāli, a mind of loving-kindness, without malice towards his fellow Brahma-farers, is not established in the monk, there will be those who will say to him:

'Please do you, venerable one, establish a mind of loving-kindness towards your fellow Brahma-farers' — thus those will say to him.

"And again, Upāli, if a monk is reproving, willing to reprove another, he should consider thus:

'Now, am I one who has heard much, an expert in the heard, a storehouse of the heard?

Those things which are lovely at the beginning, lovely in the middle, lovely at the ending, and which, with the spirit, with the letter, declare the Brahma-faring utterly fulfilled, wholly purified - are such things much heard by me, learnt by heart, repeated out loud, pondered upon, carefully attended to, well penetrated by vision?[3]

Now, is this state found in me, or not?'

If, Upāli, the monk has not heard much ... if such [347] things have not been . . . well penetrated by vision, there will be those who will say to him:

'Please do you, venerable one, master the tradition'[4] - there will be those who speak thus to him.

"And again, Upāli, if a monk is reproving, willing to reprove another, he should consider thus:

'Now,[5] are both the Pātimokkhas properly handed down[6] to me in detail, properly sectioned, properly regulated, properly investigated clause by clause, as to the linguistic form?

Is this state found in me, or not?

'If, Upāli, the two Pātimokkhas are not properly handed down to the monk in detail ... as to the linguistic form, and if they say:

'Now where, your reverence, was this spoken by the Lord?'[7] and if questioned thus he is not able to explain, there will be those who will say to him:

'Please do you, venerable one, master discipline' - there will be those who speak thus to him.

Upāli, if a monk is reproving, willing to reprove another, when he has considered these five states within himself, he may reprove the other.

 


 

"Lord, if a monk is reproving.[8] willing to reprove another, having caused how many states to be set up within himself, may he reprove the other?"

"Upāli, if a monk is reproving, willing to reprove another, having caused five states to be set up within himself, may he reprove the other.

If he thinks,

'I will speak at a right time, not at a wrong time;[9]

I will speak about fact[10] not about what is not fact;

I will speak with gentleness, not with harshness;

I will speak about what is connected with the goal, not about [348] what is unconnected with the goal;

I will speak with a mind of loving-kindness, not with inner hatred.'

Upāli, if a monk is reproving, willing to reprove another, having made these five states to be set up within himself, he may reprove the other."

 


 

"Lord, in how many ways may remorse be caused in a monk who reproves according to what is not the rule?"

"Upāli, in five ways[11] may remorse be caused in a monk who reproves according to what is not the rule.

One says:

'The venerable one reproved at a wrong time, not at a right time - you have need for remorse.[12]

The venerable one reproved about what is not fact, not about what is fact - you have need for remorse.

The venerable one reproved with harshness, not with gentleness ...

with what is unconnected with the goal, not with what is connected with the goal ...

with inner hatred, not with a mind of loving-kindness - you have need for remorse.'

Upāli, in these five ways may remorse he caused in a monk who reproves according to what is not the rule.

What is the reason for this?

To the end that no other monk might think that one might be reproved about what is not fact."

 


 

"But, Lord, in how many ways may no remorse be caused in a monk who has been reproved according to what is not the rule?"

"Upāli, in five ways may no remorse be caused in a monk who has been reproved according to what is not the rule.

One says:

'The venerable one reproved at a wrong time, not at a right time - you have no need for remorse.[13]

The venerable one reproved . . . with inner hatred, not with a mind of loving-kindness - you have no need for remorse.'

Upāli, in these five ways may no remorse be caused in a monk who has been reproved according to what is not the rule."

 


 

"Lord, in how many ways may no remorse be caused in a monk who reproves according to rule?"

"In five ways,[14] Upāli, may no remorse be caused in a monk [349] who reproves according to rule.

One says:

'The venerable one reproved at a right time, not at a wrong time - you have no need for remorae.

The venerable one reproved ... not with inner hatred, but with a mind of loving-kindness - you have no need for remorse.'

In these five ways, Upāli, may no remorse be caused in a monk who reproves according to rule.

What is the reason?

To the end that another monk should think that one should be reproved about what is fact."

 


 

"But, Lord, in how many ways may remorse be caused in a monk who has been reproved according to rule?"

"In five ways Upāli, may remorse be caused in a monk who has been reproved according to rule.

One says:

'The venerable one reproved at a right time, not at a wrong time - you have need for remorse.

The venerable one reproved ... not with inner hatred, but with a mind of loving-kindness - you have need for remorse.'

Upāli, in these five ways may remorse be caused in a monk whohas been reproved according to the rule."

 


 

"Lord, if a monk is reproving, willing to reprove another, having attended to how many states within himself may he repeove the other?

Upāli, if a monk is reproving, willing to reprove another, having attended to five states within himself, he may reprove the other: compassion, seeking welfare, sympathy, removal of offences, aiming at discipline.

Upāli, if a monk is reproving willing to reprove another, having attended to these five states within himself,he may reprove the other."

But, Lord, in how many mental objects should there be support for a monk who has been reproved?"

Upāli, there should be support in two mental objects for a monk who has been reproved: in truth and in being imperturbable."[15]

Told is the Ninth Section: that on suspending the Pātimokkha.

 


[1] Cf. A. v. 79 ff., addressed to "monks."

[2] Cf. M. ii. II3

[3] Cf. CV. IV. 14. 19.

[4] āgama; here in opposition to vinaya, see next clause. On āgatāgama one to whom the tradition has been handed down, see B.D. iii. 71, n. 1.

[5] As at Vin. iv. 51 (B.D. ii. z66, where see notes), and above CV. IV.14.19.

[6] āgatāini; cf. āgatāgama and suttāgata at e.g. Vin. iv. 144 (B.D. iii. 43, n. 5).

[7] VA. 1289 explains. "in which town was th1s rule of training spoken by the Lord?" - thus making "where" refer to locality and not to context.

[8] Cf. A. iii. 196, where this passage is put into the mouth of Sanputta. A. v. 81 (addressed to monks). The five recur at D. iii. 236. Cf. also M. i. 95.

[9] Cf. M. i. 126, A. iii. 243. VA. 1289 explains "one monk having obtained leave from another (to reprove him), when he is reproving him speaks at a right time. But reproving him in the midst of an Order or a group, in a hut where tickets and conjey are distributed, in a quadrangular building, when he is walking for alms, on a road, on a seat or in a hall, when he is among his supporters, or at the moment of the Invitation - this is called at a wrong time."

[10] bhūtena, about what has happened. VA. 1290 explams by taccha, what is true, real, justified.

[11] Cf. A. iii. 197.

[12] Here presumably the reprover is being spoken to.

[13] Here the one reproved is being spoken to.

[14] Cf. A. iii. 198.

[15] akappa, being free from anger, immovable. Cf. A. iii. 198, which slightly elaborates the thoughts a reproved monk might have.


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