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Much Ado about Nothing

The Harvard Psychedelic Club
by
Don Lattin
HarperCollins, New York, 2011

AN E-MAIL SENT TO DR. WEIL copy to Dr. Alpert, two of the characters presented in this book.

In it I find the very sad situation that exists between Dr. Weil and Richard Alpert jumping out at me.

Beginning with the 'given' that there is kamma (that's Pali, the language/teaching of Gotama, AKA the Buddha, aka, the Awakened One), and that according to Gotama's view kamma is intent and that one experiences the consequences of intentional acts in accordance with that intent, and that further (I need to add this because it is largely unheardof in the West) the consequences of kamma are not one-for-one, but hugely magnified, Dr. Weil's wish that he be forgiven by Dr. Alpert could be satisfied by his giving to Dr. Alpert every material gain since his act of betrayal as well as a statement to Dr. Alpert of his understanding of the issue and intent to change his behavior.

How so? Because it is clear that Dr. Weil's actions resulted in the 'theft' of the energies of both Dr. Alpert and Dr. Leary that would have propelled them in career directions significantly different than those that resulted after that energy had been taken. It is clear that Dr. Weil's material gains are entirely dependent on that initial act of betrayal: it is that act which is the foundation for all that follows, and it is further clear that given Dr. Weil's delight in his fame and material possessions, that given the opportunity to start over, he would do it again.

It is my perception that this is what is disturbing Dr. Alpert in such a way as is (correctly!) preventing him from forgiving Dr. Weil.

Forgiveness is not a kammic thing. Understanding is. Forgiveness is a matter for Dr. Alpert to deal with. But there is no need to forgive what one has not been asked to forgive, and what Dr. Weil has asked to be forgiven for is not what he did. What Dr. Weil needs is acknowledgement of his renewed direction from either his victims or from some other person of strong enough substance to insure Dr. Weil has both understood as it is what he has done and is truly set on reform. At such a time as such is done, he will be freed from any need to have Dr. Alpert's forgiveness. Lack of forgiveness will then be Dr. Alpert's problem alone.

Taking bets on whether this gets to Dr. Weil and whether or not it is given consideration.


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