The Pali Line

Jagarianuyoga

didn't didn't

Jagarianuyoga — Self Discipline

"I'll guard the gold,
and you go Yoga Class."

"Indians never attack at night,"
said the Indian. "I'll guard the gate
an you go s l e e e e e p e e d e e p e e s l e e p e e"

 


 

These 4 should not be dealt with
carelessly simply because they are young:

A crown prince
A poisonous snake
A fire
A sorcerer's apprentice

SN 1.3:1

 


 

Guarding the Senses

These are the senses:

Sight
Hearing
Smell
Taste
Touch
Knowing

These are what are called
the Doors to the Senses:

The Eye
The Ear
The Nose
The Tongue
The Body
The Mind

The experience of sense awareness arises as a consequence of contact.

Contact is the simultaneous presence of sense organ with it's appropriate stimulus and consciousness.

A visual object comes within the scope of the eye, and the result is sensation associated with the sight (experienced as pleasant, unpleasant, or not-unpleasant-but-not pleasant); perception and consciousness.

A previous act of identification with the activities that started the process [intent to create personal experience coupled to deeds of body, speech and mind] puts a sort of 'mark of ownership' on the consequences and it is identifying (claiming, recognizing) these markers that results in the experience known as "My sight", or "I am seeing."

The experience of sensation — that is, the subjective reaction to or evaluation of the unpleasant or pleasant (physical, verbal or mental) — changes in accodance with whether or not the individual is oriented to gain in the experience of worldly pleasures or to attaining an end to kamma. For example the experience of pleasant sensation arising from kamma to be experienced as worldly pleasure can be changed to the perception of the unpleasant implications of that situation for one seeking to end kamma. Thus the pleasant can be experienced as pleasant or unpleasant, the unpleasant can be experienced as unpleasant or pleasant, or both can be experienced indifferently.

p.p. explains it all — p.p.

Arising from this experience comes liking or disliking depending on the sensation and whether or not one's original intent was to create worldly experience or to escape the world.

Both liking and disliking, are, in the Pali, forms of wanting and lead to action that repeats the cycle and results in an outcome determined by kamma.

For this reason, the beggar trains himself to be wary of sights, sounds, scents, flavors, touches, and thoughts.

Being aware of the danger,
he guards "The Doors of the Senses"
and when an object of sense
comes into the range
of an organ of sense,
he neither dwells on its general appearance
nor it's details.
— He is aware of it, but does not 'think about' it
or dwell on the sensation associated with it
or take delight in it
or react to it's influence
or say to himself 'sensing, sensing, sensing'.

 


 

Moderate Eating

Here the practice of the time called "The OneMealMan Practice", will be described in order to provide an idea of how the modern practitioner might modify his own eating habits in order to further his Dhamma progress:

Noon means up to two finger-widths past the point where a perpendicular stick casts no shadow in North India — that is, until about 1:00, clock-time.

p.p. explains it all — p.p.

In this case
a beggar eats one meal a day,
after sunup,
before noon.

For a sutta dealing with the introduction of this practtice, resistance to it, and Gotama's justification of it, see MN 70.

p.p. explains it all — p.p.

The original practice consisted of two styles, called "Hard Man" and "Soft Man".

Hard Man practice
was the practice of eating
at one sitting
from the contents of one bowl.

The meal is done,
no matter how much was eaten,
if the beggar rose up from eating
(hand-out bowl clean —
we would say "gets up from the table").

In the Soft Man Practice
(which was the practice adopted by Gotama),
a beggar could eat several bowls-full
at several sittings
and even take one bowl-full
back to his residence
for eating later,
provided all eating was completed
before noon.

The Buddha's usual actual practice,
we can gather from his own statements
and descriptions found in the Pali,
was to eat one bowl full at one sitting.
Occasionally he would take additional food,
which is why he would be described as practicing
"Soft Man Style".

At one time he pointed out:

"It is not because I am austere
in my eating practices
that those who follow me
respect me as they do,
for there are those
whose practices are far more austere than mine,
it is because I teach a higher Dhamma
that they respect me as they do."

Modifications were made to both practices at the request of laymen wishing to make good kamma.

These were that a beggar of either style could, if he had such, drink a beverage and eat a piece of bread or pastry upon rising up before going on his begging rounds.

All beggars ate whatever they wished that was allowable that was placed in the bowl.

There was, at one time, a huge dispute over what was and what was not proper to eat.

The dispute was begun by the infamous Buddhist bad guy, Devadatta, who tried to institute the practice of not eating flesh. (He wanted to prove himself more austere than Gotama).

The dispute threatened to disrupt the Order, and so Gotama laid out the rules of what was proper to "accept" in a formula he called "The Threes:"

Flesh was acceptable if

It was not

1. Seen
2. Heard
3. Suspected

To have been
1. killed by one's self
2. requested to have been killed by one's self
3. killed specifically for him.

An individual could be a vegetarian if he wished,
but there was no bad kamma
(and no rule)
associated with eating something
"killed on speculation"
by a butcher or hunter
or found dead, etc.

It is the intent that is the important thing,
and in such a case
there is no intent
(that is, by the beggar,
or by another for that specific beggar
that that beggar is aware of).

It is possible to adopt the One-Meal-Man practice and be quite fat and happy,
but one should approach this sort of diet with good sense.

There is a reasonable period of adjustment of a few weeks during which there will be for some a fair to middling battle with desire for food.

(and this desire may re-surface from time-to-time usually in association with other unrelated changes)

A six month or so period follows during which there is considerable weight loss
(especially for people who are overweight)
and during this time one should be careful not to exceed one's limits.

This is a practice that was intended to provide adequate sustenance to a beggar whose desire to bring kamma to an end had already caused him to become a homeless wanderer, willing to die if necessary, to achieve his goals.

It was not designed for a modern family man working long hours or doing manual labor or who was under a great deal of stress.

After a period of adjustment the body will return to a normal healthy weight and the energy level will be high and there will be a substantial improvement in one's feelings of well being.

At this point it is possible to work long hours, do manual labor and keep up with the strongest of them or work under great stress without problems.

It is during the period of adjustment that caution should be taken.

One meal or many meals,
all are advised to eat moderately,

Not for the pleasure of taste
Not out of habit
Not to fill time
Not for good looks
Not for show of wealth,
But only just sufficient to keep the body going a little further on This Way, thinking:

"By this moderate eating practice
I will bring old kamma to conclusion
and set going no new kamma,
and I will have sufficient sustenance,
while living blamelessly."

Some of the benefits of moderate eating are:

There are few things that are as swift in the furtherance of the attainment of magic powers and clarity of view than a little hunger! It re-awakens the hunter in one.

p.p. explains it all — p.p.

One wants little
In times of scarcity one is prepared
The body is healthy: One has few illnesses and recovers from illnesses quickly
One's time is not wasted in slavery to the belly
The mind is clear and alert
One is of little trouble to one's supporters.

 


 

Content with Little

Content with little
Like a bird on the wing
That takes with him only his wings
As he flies
So the beggar, beggars
Takes only his bowl and robes
And goes whithersoever he will

 


 

The Wakeful Watch

foot

For the sake of those wishing to adjust their own habits of wakefulness, here is the Pali ideal:

The ideal, when asleep, is to remain wide-awake — clearly conscious. If dreaming, watch the dreams with an awareness of separateness. This is approximately 100% the opposite of what is taught by Carlos Castenada's Don Juan, where the objective is 'being in dreaming'. Don Juan's idea is to create a 'dreaming body' — a dream-like and fluid identified-with self-conscious self-controlled body that acts in the dream state. Here the approach is to separate from any identified-with state.

The Buddha was said to have slept only rarely, on occasions when he was ill,
or when he was very old, during the hottest part of the day.

p.p. explains it all — p.p.

During the day, pace back and forth and sit, clearing the mind of distracting mental states.

During the first watch of the night, pace back and forth and sit, clearing the mind of distracting mental states.

During the majjhima (middle/magic) watch of the night, lie down in the lion posture (on the right side, with the head supported by the right arm, and with the legs one on top of the other so that one foot is over the other — bone on bone!) and, clearly conscious and wide awake, focus the mind on the time of rising up again.

During the last watch, after rising up, pace back and forth and sit, clearing the mind of distracting mental states.

 

 

 

 

 


 

On Guarding the Senses, Moderate Eating, and Vigilance

From the Maha-Assapura-Sutta, Majjhima Nikaya, I #39

Translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.
Provenance, terms and conditons

 


 

I have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was staying among the Angas.

Now, the Angas have a town named Assapura.

There the Blessed One addressed the monks, "Monks!"

"Yes, lord," the monks responded.

The Blessed One said:

"'Contemplative, contemplatives'

that is how people perceive you.

And when asked,

'What are you?'

you claim that

'We are contemplatives.'

So, with this being your designation and this your claim,
this is how you should train yourselves:

'We will undertake and practice those qualities that make one a contemplative,
that make one a brahman,
so that our designation will be true
and our claim accurate;
so that the services of those whose robes,
alms-food,
lodging,
and medicinal requisites we use
will bring them great fruit and great reward;
and so that our going forth
will not be barren,
but fruitful and fertile.'

Conscience and concern

"And what, monks, are the qualities that make one a contemplative,
that make one a brahman?

'We will be endowed with conscience and concern
(for the consequences of wrong-doing)':

That's how you should train yourselves.

Now the thought may occur to you,

'We are endowed with conscience and concern.
That much is enough,
that much means we're done,
so that the goal of our contemplative state
has been reached.
There's nothing further to be done,'

and you may rest content with just that.

So I tell you, monks.

I exhort you, monks.

Don't let those of you who seek the contemplative state
fall away from the goal of the contemplative state
when there is more to be done.

Purity of conduct

"And what more is to be done?

'Our bodily conduct will be pure,
clear and open,
unbroken and restrained.

We will not exalt ourselves
nor disparage others
on account of that pure bodily conduct':

That's how you should train yourselves.

Now the thought may occur to you,

'We are endowed with conscience and concern.
Our bodily conduct is pure.
That much is enough,
that much means we're done,
so that the goal of our contemplative state
has been reached.
There's nothing further to be done,'

and you may rest content with just that.

So I tell you, monks.

I exhort you, monks.

Don't let those of you who seek the contemplative state
fall away from the goal of the contemplative state
when there is more to be done.

"And what more is to be done?

'Our verbal conduct ...
our mental conduct will be pure,
clear and open,
unbroken and restrained.

We will not exalt ourselves
nor disparage others
on account of that pure verbal ...
mental conduct':

That's how you should train yourselves.

Now the thought may occur to you,

'We are endowed with conscience and concern.
Our bodily conduct is pure.
Our verbal conduct ...
our mental conduct is pure.
That much is enough,
that much means we're done,
so that the goal of our contemplative state
has been reached.
There's nothing further to be done,'

and you may rest content with just that.

So I tell you, monks.

I exhort you, monks.

Don't let those of you who seek the contemplative state
fall away from the goal of the contemplative state
when there is more to be done.

"And what more is to be done?

'Our livelihood will be pure,
clear and open,
unbroken and restrained.

We will not exalt ourselves
nor disparage others
on account of that pure livelihood':

That's how you should train yourselves.

Now the thought may occur to you,

'We are endowed with conscience and concern.
Our bodily conduct is pure.
Our verbal conduct ...
our mental conduct is pure.
Our livelihood is pure.
That much is enough,
that much means we're done,
so that the goal of our contemplative state has been reached.
There's nothing further to be done,'

and you may rest content with just that.

So I tell you, monks.

I exhort you, monks.

Don't let those of you who seek the contemplative state
fall away from the goal of the contemplative state
when there is more to be done.

Restraint of the senses

"And what more is to be done?

'We will guard the doors to our sense faculties.

On seeing a form with the eye,
we will not grasp at any theme or variations
by which — if we were to dwell
without restraint over the faculty of the eye
— evil, unskillful qualities
such as greed or distress
might assail us.
We will practice for its restraint.
We will protect the faculty of the eye.
We will achieve restraint
with regard to the faculty of the eye.

On hearing a sound with the ear ...
On smelling an aroma with the nose ...
On tasting a flavor with the tongue ...
On feeling a tactile sensation with the body ...
On cognizing an idea with the intellect,
we will not grasp at any theme or variations
by which — if we were to dwell
without restraint over the faculty of the intellect
— evil, unskillful qualities
such as greed or distress
might assail us.
We will practice for its restraint.
We will protect the faculty of the intellect.
We will achieve restraint
with regard to the faculty of the intellect':

That's how you should train yourselves.

Now the thought may occur to you,

'We are endowed with conscience and concern.
Our bodily conduct is pure.
Our verbal conduct ...
our mental conduct is pure.
Our livelihood is pure.
We guard the doors to our sense faculties.
That much is enough,
that much means we're done,
so that the goal of our contemplative state
has been reached.
There's nothing further to be done,'

and you may rest content with just that.

So I tell you, monks.

I exhort you, monks.

Don't let those of you who seek the contemplative state
fall away from the goal of the contemplative state
when there is more to be done.

Moderation in eating

"And what more is to be done?

'We will have a sense of moderation in eating.

Remember! If you are reading the suttas in English, you are reading a translation and translations are interpretations! For your own safety you need to begin to learn a few terms in Pali so that you will be able to compare between translations and between sutta and sutta!
Iti purāṇañ ca vedanaṃ paṭihankhāmi navañ ca vedanaṃ na uppādessāmi.
'Thus former sensation slap-back and to no new sensation giving-rise'
'Feeling' for 'Sensation' is not a problem, but it is not 'destroying old feelings of hunger' and 'not creating new feelings from overeating' that is the point here; it is stopping the cycle of intentional actions producing identified-with consequences that is the point. 'Hunger' and 'Overeating' are not in the Pali and are not the problems. That 'Iti,' 'Thus' points the way. The emphasis needs to be on the lack of desire connected with the eating, not on the destruction of the feeling of hunger. One slaps back the arising sensations by not indulging in their pleasantness (as tastes, means for beautification, for show of wealth ...) thus providing no platform for new desires for more or different foods as one eats and it is by that and not by not overeating that the arising of new sensations is prevented.

See also SN 4.35.120

p.p. explains it all — p.p.

Considering it appropriately,
we will take food not playfully,
nor for intoxication,
nor for putting on bulk,
nor for beautification,
but simply for the survival and continuance of this body,
for ending its afflictions,
for the support of the holy life, thinking,
"I will destroy old feelings [of hunger]
and not create new feelings [from overeating].
Thus I will maintain myself,
be blameless,
and live in comfort"':

That's how you should train yourselves.

Now the thought may occur to you,

'We are endowed with conscience and concern.
Our bodily conduct is pure.
Our verbal conduct ...
our mental conduct is pure.
Our livelihood is pure.
We guard the doors to our sense faculties.
We have a sense of moderation in eating.
That much is enough,
that much means we're done,
so that the goal of our contemplative state
has been reached.
There's nothing further to be done,'

and you may rest content with just that.

So I tell you, monks.

I exhort you, monks.

Don't let those of you who seek the contemplative state
fall away from the goal of the contemplative state
when there is more to be done.

Wakefulness

"And what more is to be done?

'We will be devoted to wakefulness.
During the day,
sitting and pacing back and forth,
we will cleanse the mind of any qualities
that would hold it in check.

During the first watch of the night,
sitting and pacing back and forth,
we will cleanse the mind of any qualities
that would hold it in check.

During the second watch of the night
reclining on his right side,
we will take up the lion's posture,
one foot placed on top of the other,
mindful, alert,
with the mind set on getting up
[either as soon as we awaken or at a particular time].

During the last watch of the night,
sitting and pacing back and forth,
we will cleanse the mind of any qualities
that would hold it in check':

That's how you should train yourselves.

Now the thought may occur to you,

'We are endowed with conscience and concern.
Our bodily conduct is pure.
Our verbal conduct ...
our mental conduct is pure.
Our livelihood is pure.
We guard the doors to our sense faculties.
We have a sense of moderation in eating.
We are devoted to wakefulness.
That much is enough,
that much means we're done,
so that the goal of our contemplative state
has been reached.
There's nothing further to be done,'

and you may rest content with just that.

So I tell you, monks.

I exhort you, monks.

Don't let those of you who seek the contemplative state
fall away from the goal of the contemplative state
when there is more to be done.

 

§

 

I stop here because this is as far as we have discussed, but this sutta goes on to describe the other things that are further to be done:

and I protest to you, friends,

I declare to you,

while you are aiming at the destruction of dukkha,
fall not short of the destruction of dukkha,
if there is something further to be done.

And what is further to be done?

The development of memory and clear consciousness,
the elimination of involvement with:

Wanting,
Deviance,
Sloth and torpor,
Fear and trembling,
and doubt.

The attainment of High Serenity,
the recollection of former habitations,
the knowledge of the outcome of kamma,
the knowledge and vision of the destruction of the corrupting influences:

Sense Pleasure,
Living,
Blindness

and,
in the freedom from the āsavas,
the knowledge that one is free,
and the comprehension that birth is left behind,
the best life has been lived,
duty's doing is done,
and that there is no more being
any kind of an "it" in any place of "atness" left for one.

 


 

No Other Single Sight

AN: The Book of Ones

 

Beggars!
I see no other single sight
By which a man's mind is more enslaved
Than by that of a woman
Indeed, beggars,
The sight of a woman
Obsesses a man's mind.

 

§

 

Beggars!
I see no other single sound, scent, taste or touch
By which a man's mind is more enslaved
Than by that of a woman
Indeed, beggars,
The sound, scent, taste and touch of a woman
Obsesses a man's mind

 

§

 

Beggars!
I see no other single sight
By which a woman's mind is more enslaved
Than by that of a man
Indeed, beggars,
The sight of a man
Obsesses a woman's mind.

 

§

 

Beggars!
I see no other single sound, scent, taste or touch
By which a woman's mind is more enslaved
Than by that of a man
Indeed, beggars,
The sound, scent, taste and touch of a man
Obsesses a woman's mind

 


 

The Mind is Pure

AN 1.49

 

The mind, beggars, is pure,
but is defiled by corruption from without.

This the uneducated common man
does not understand as it really is.

Because he does not understand this,
the uneducated common man
makes no effort to cultivate the mind,
I say

 

§

 

The mind, beggars, is pure,
and can be cleansed of corruptions
that came from without.

This the well tamed,
well trained,
well educated
student of the Aristocrats understands
as it really is.

Thus there is
for the well tamed,
well trained,
well educated
student of the Aristocrats
cultivation of the mind,
say I

 


 

Energetic Effort

AN: The Book of Ones

 

Beggars!
I see no other single thing
Of more power to cause
The arising of good conditions
Not yet in the here and now, or
The subsidence of bad conditions
Already in the here and now, as
energetic effort

In the beggar that makes energetic effort
good conditions not yet in the here and now appear, and
bad conditions in the here and now disappear

 


 

Wanting Little

AN: The Book of Ones

 

Beggars!
I see no other single thing
Of more Power to cause
The arising of good conditions
Not yet in the here and now, or
The subsidence of bad conditions
Already in the here and now, as
Wanting little
In the beggar that wants little
Good conditions not yet in the here and now appear, and
Bad conditions in the here and now disappear

 


 

Contentment

AN: The Book of Ones

 

Beggars!
I see no other single thing
Of more power to cause
The arising of good conditions
Not yet in the here and now, or
The subsidence of bad conditions
Already in the here and now, as
Contentment
In the beggar that is content
Good conditions not yet in the here and now appear, and
Bad conditions in the here and now disappear

 


 

Studious Etiological Examination

AN: The Book of Ones

 

Beggars!
I see no other single thing
Of more power to cause
The arising of good conditions
Not yet in the here and now, or
The subsidence of bad conditions
Already in the here and now, as
Studious etiological examination
In the beggar that gives studious etiological examination to things
Good conditions not yet in the here and now appear, and
Bad conditions in the here and now disappear

 


 

Objective Detachment

AN: The Book of Ones

 

Beggars!
I see no other single thing
Of more power to cause
The arising of good conditions
Not yet in the here and now, or
The subsidence of bad conditions
Already in the here and now, as
objective detachment
In the beggar who is objectively detached
Good conditions not yet in the here and now appear, and
Bad conditions in the here and now disappear

 


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 [ The Gradual Course ]  [ I. Nidana ]  [ II.Dana — Giving ]  [ II.Sila — Ethical Culture ]  [ III. Jagarianuyoga — Self Discipline ]  [ The Second Lesson ]  [ The Third Lesson ]  [ The Fourth Lesson ]  [ The Fifth Lesson ]  [ The Sixth Lesson ]  [ The Seventh Lesson ]  [ The Eighth Lesson ]  [ TheGreatMastersSatisfactionPastures ]  [ HighGetnHigh ]  [ The 10th Question I ]  [ The 10th Question II ]


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