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Index of the Suttas of the
A'nguttara Nikaaya
Pa~ncaka-Nipaata

Key

Index of Sutta Indexes


 

A'nguttara Nikaaya

PTS: A'nguttara Nikaaya, The html formatted Pali Text Society edition of the Pali text.
Volume III Fives and Sixes, ed. by E. Hardy, London: Pali Text Society 1897.

PTS: A'nguttara Nikaaya, The Sri Lanka Buddha Jayanti Tripitaka Series Pali text
Volume III Fives and Sixes.

The Pali text for individual suttas listed below is adapted from the Sri Lanka Buddha Jayanti Tripitaka Series [BJT]. Pali vagga titles are links to this version of the Pali. Each translation is linked to it's Pali version and to the PTS, Olds and where available to the WP Bhk. Bodhi and ATI Bhk. Thanissaro translation, and each of these is in turn linked back to each of the others. Much, but not all the Pali has been checked against the Pali Text Society edition, and many of the suttas have been reformatted to include the original Pali (and/or organizational) phrase and sentence breaks.

PTS: The Book of the Gradual Sayings A'nguttara Nikaaya or More-Numbered Suttas
ATI: Translations of Bhikkhu Thanissaro and others originally located on Access to Insight
WP: The Numerical Discourses of the Buddha, Bhikkhu Bodhi translation
BD: The M. Olds translations

5. Pa~ncaka-Nipaata, III.1

PTS: The Book of the Fives
ATI: Book of the Fives
WP: The Book of the Fives

I. Sekhabala Vagga, III.1

PTS: The Learner's Power, Hare, trans., III.1
WP: The Trainee's Powers, 629

#1. Sekha-Bala-Sa'nkhitta Sutta.m, I.1

An undefined list of five Powers or Allys of the Seeker.

PTS: The powers in brief, Hare, trans., III.1
BD: The Seeker's Allies - In Sum, Olds, trans
WP: 1. In Brief, 629

#2. Sekha-Bala-Vitthata Sutta.m, III.2

The Allys or Powers of the Seeker analyzed separately.
Alternatively 'broken apart', i.e., analyzed in detail. The problem with translating Vitthaara as 'in detail' is that the way the Buddha taught, everything he says is 'in brief'; one can take each level and break it down further. So, for example this sutta is giving us 'more detail', but cannot be said to be a fully detailed analysis. There is much more to be learned about the Balas of the Seeker.

PTS: The powers in detail, Hare, trans., III.1
ATI: (Strengths) in Detail, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
BD: The Seeker's Allies - Analyzed Separately, Olds, trans.
WP: 2. In Detail, 629

#3. Dukkha Sutta.m, III.3

Five things that conduce to pain here and hereafter and five things that conduce to pleasure here and hereafter.

PTS: Ill, Hare, trans., III.2
BD: Pain, Olds, trans.
WP: 3. Suffering, 630

#4. Yathaabhata Sutta.m, III.3

Five things which conduce to being brought to a state such as Hell and five things which conduce to being brought to a state such as Heaven.

PTS: Due, Hare, trans., III.3
BD: To Suchas This State Brought, Olds, trans.
WP: 4. As If Brought There, 631

#5. Sikkhaapaccakkhaana Sutta.m, III.4

A bhikkhu or bhikkhuni rejecting The Seeking out of hand returning to lesser things, is subject as it were visibly, to five sorts of critical and deprecating thought from a standpoint consistant with Dhamma. The one who sticks with it, no matter how painful, incurs praise.

PTS: The Training, Hare, trans., III.3
BD: Rejecting The Seeking Out-of-Hand, Olds, trans.
MNL: Precepts, Sister Upalivana, trans.
WP: 5. Training, 631

#6. Akusala-Samaapatti Sutta.m, III.5

The Buddha explains how when faith, sense of shame, fear-of-blame, energy and wisdom are established as instinctive responses, unskillful states find it impossible to gain access.
The word to understand here is paccupa.t.thitaa. PED: Paccupa.t.thita [pp. of paccupa.t.thahati; [pa.ti+upa+sthaa] "to stand up before," to be present;] (re)presented, offered, at one's disposal, imminent, ready, present. I would say rather to have at one's disposal (uprising, upa) the reflex (pa.ti) previously established (sthaa, stood up) of ... In other words at the first appearance of danger faith etc. reflexively also appears: what we call an 'instinctive response' or 'muscle response' a habitual response recollected more by the musclulature than through thought processes. Hare: "is set on"; Bhk. Bodhi: "is securely settled in."
The point is to give assurance that one has not fallen off track simply because one is harassed in mind by unskillful things; as long as the skills of faith, etc. have been thoroughly ingrained in one's thought processes they will come forward and the skillful will prevail.

PTS: The stepping in, Hare, trans., III.4
WP: 6. Entering, 632
BD: Unskillful Aquirements, Olds, trans.

#7. Kaamesu-Palaa.lita Sutta.m, III.5

The Buddha explains how when faith, sense of shame, fear-of-blame, energy and wisdom are not yet established as instinctive responses, a bhikkhu is one who has gone forth from faith. But when these things are established as instinctive responses, one is able to protect oneself.

PTS: Of pleasures, Hare, trans., III.4
WP: 7. Sensual Pleasures, 633

#8. Cavana Sutta.m, III.6

The Buddha explains how when faith, sense of shame, fear-of-blame, energy and wisdom are lacking a bhikkhu is subject to falling away. But possessing these things he does not fall away.

PTS: He Falls Away, Hare, trans., III.5
WP: 8. Falling Away (1), 633

#9. Pa.thama Agaarava Sutta.m, III.7

The Buddha explains how when in a disrespectful bhikkhu faith, sense of shame, fear-of-blame, energy and wisdom are lacking he is subject to falling away. But possessing these things he does not fall away.
A qualified version of the previous. There is confusion in titles between the PTS and Bhk. Bodhi, but the suttas are the same.

PTS: No respect, Hare, trans., III.5
WP: 9. Falling Away (2), 634

#10. Dutiya Agaarava Sutta.m, III.8

The Buddha explains how when in a disrespectful bhikkhu faith, sense of shame, fear-of-blame, energy and wisdom are lacking he is incapable of progress in this Dhamma. But possessing these things he is capable of progress.
The inverse of the previous sutta. In terms of content there is a closer relationship of #9 to #10 than of #9 to #8

PTS: Without respect, Hare, trans., III.6
WP: 10. Irreverent, 634

II. Bala Vagga, III.9

PTS: The Powers, III.6
WP: Powers, 635

#11. Tathaagata Bala Sutta.m, III.9

The Buddha claims to have discovered and mastered things that had not been heard of before. He then states that faith, sense of shame, fear-of-blame, energy and wisdom are Powers of one who has 'got it' and that it is because he possesses these Powers, of those who have 'got it', he claims the place of chief.
There is no direct claim here that these Powers were unheard of before or that he was the discoverer of them. It is because he had these powers that he discovered what was unheard-of before (which would have been essentially the Four Truths) and set rolling the Dhamma wheel.

PTS: Things Unheard Of, Hare, trans., III.6
WP: 11. Not Heard Before, 635

#12. Kuu.ta Sutta.m aka Sekhabalaagga Sutta.m, III.10

Between the powers of faith, conscientiousness (sense of shame), fear of blame, energy and wisdom, wisdom is considered the peak. Hare translates 'pa~n~naa' as 'insight.'

PTS: The Peak, Hare, trans., III.7
WP: 12. Peak (1), 636

#13. Bala-Sa'nikhitta Sutta.m, III.10

The five Powers: faith, energy, memory, serenity and wisdom. Hare translates: faith, energy, mindfulness, concentration and insight.

PTS: The Powers In Brief, Hare, trans., III.7
WP: 13. In Brief, 636

#14. Bala-Vitthata Sutta.m, III.10

The Buddha defines faith-power, energy-power, mind-power, serenity-power and wisdom-power.

PTS: The Powers in Detail, Hare, trans., III.
WP: 14. In Detail, 636

#15. Bala-Da.t.thabba Sutta.m, III.11

Practices and accomplishments where faith-power, energy-power, mind-power, serenity-power and wisdom-power may be seen as they actually are. The word used here is 'da.t.tha' which is the seeing of one who sees, not the seeing of one who understands just the theory. Do these things and you will see the powers. Not things that are evidence of the powers.

PTS: Where To Be Seen, Hare, trans., III.8
WP: 15. To Be Seen, 637

#16. Dutiya Bala Agga Sutta.m, III.12

Between the power of faith, the power of energy, the power of mindfulness, the power of concentration, and the power of wisdom, the power of wisdom is considered the peak.

PTS: The Peak (2), Hare, trans., III.9
WP: 16. Peak (2), 638

#17. Attahita Sutta.m, III.12

By perfecting ethical behavior, serenity, release and knowledge and vision of release in himself, but not working to perfect these things in others one is working for one's own good, but not that of another.

PTS: For Whose Good? (a), Hare, trans., III.9
WP: 17. Welfare (1), 638

#18. Parahita Sutta.m, III.13

By striving to perfect ethical behavior, serenity, release and knowledge and vision of release in others, but not in himself, one is working for the good of others, but not for his own good.

PTS: For Whose Good? (b), Hare, trans., III.9
WP: 18. Welfare (2), 638

#19. N'eva Attahita-no Parahita Sutta.m, III.13

By neither striving for the perfection of ethical behavior, serenity, release and knowledge and vision of release in him self nor in others one is working for neither the good of himself nor of others.

PTS: For Whose Good? (c), Hare, trans., III.9
WP: 19. Welfare (3), 639

#20. Attahita-Parahita Sutta.m, III.14

By both striving for the perfection of ethical behavior, serenity, release and knowledge and vision of release in himself and in others one is working for the good of himself and of others.

PTS: For Whose Good? (c), Hare, trans., III.10
ATI: Benefit, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 20. Welfare (4), 639

III. Pa~nca'ngika Vagga, III.14

PTS: The Fivefold, III.10
WP: Five Factored, 640

#21. Pa.thama Agaarava Sutta.m, III.14

A Paticca Samuppada-like sutta showing the progressive interdependence of living respectfully and harmoniously with others, keeping the minor precepts, adhering to the seekers training, living ethically, understanding high views, and attaining serenity.

PTS: Without Respect (a), Hare, trans., III.10
WP: 21. Irreverent (1), 640

#22. Dutiya Agaarava Sutta.m, III.15

A Paticca Samuppada-like sutta showing the progressive interdependence of living respectfully and harmoniously with others, keeping the minor precepts, adhering to the seekers training, fully developing ethical behavior, attaining every degree of serenity, and fully developing wisdom.

PTS: Without Respect (b), Hare, trans., III.10
WP: 22. Irreverent (2), 640

#23. Upakkilesa Sutta.m, III.16

The Buddha likens the process of purifying the mind to the process of purifying gold. Then he describes five super-normal powers attainable with the purified mind.

PTS: The Debasements, Hare, trans., III.11
WP: 23. Defilements, 641

#24. Dussiila Sutta.m, III.19

The Buddha outlines the progressive interdependence of ethical behavior, serenity, knowing and seeing, disenchantment and dispassion, and knowing and seeing freedom. Hare who previously used 'insight' for 'pa~n~naa,' 'wisdom' here uses 'insight' for 'dassana,' seeing, so it is necessary to discover which he is referring to when you encounter this term in his translations. He has translated the final step, 'vimutti-~naa.na-dassana' 'emancipated knowledge and insight.' Bhk. Bodhi (more correctly) here has: 'knowledge and vision of liberation.' Literally: 'freedom-knowledge-seeing'. Where having known and seen freedom as freedom does result in emancipated knowledge and freedom, what is being spoken of in this sutta is the consequence of having dispassion and disenchantment. The immediate result of that is knowing and seeing freedom. It is not sufficient to attain freedom. One must know that one is free and know that this freedom is the freedom one has been seeking. Otherwise there will be nothing to prevent recrudescence of existence and birth. The earlier 'knowing and seeing' is the knowing and seeing of the Four Truths or the seeing of and approval of the theory, an achievement of the Streamwinner.

PTS: For the Wicked, Hare, trans., III.14
WP: 24. Immoral, 643

#25. Anuggahiita Sutta.m, III.20

Five things of great assistance in the development of freedom of heart and mind and the things that result from freedom of heart and mind.

PTS: Helped On, Hare, trans., III.15
ATI: Supported, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 25. Assisted, 644

#26. Vimuttaayatana Sutta.m, III.21

Five detailed descriptions of situations that result in freedom.
There is confusion throughout the translations and within the translations of individual translators between the translations of 'vimutti' and 'vimokkha'. The distinction is that 'vimokkha' is a temporary state, 'vimutti' is a synonym of Nibbaana.' I suggest 'Release' is better for 'Vimokkha' and 'Freedom' be used for 'Vimutti.'

PTS: Release, Hare, trans., III.15
WP: 26. Liberation, 644,
BD: Access to Freedom, Olds, trans.

#27. Samaadhi Sutta.m, III.24

Five knowledges that arise in one who developes immeasurable serenity.

PTS: Concentration, Hare, trans., III.17
ATI: (Immeasurable) Concentration, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 27. Concentration, 647
BD: Serenity, Olds, trans.

#28. Pa~nc'a'ngika-Samaadhi Sutta.m, III.25

Consummate Samadhi described as consisting of five dimensions (the four usual jhanas and observation of the sign) and yielding skill in the higher knowledges.
This description of the jhaanas has with it the similes which are very helpful in visualizing the progression of the jhaanas. [see also for these: DN 2, MN 39,MN 77] However Hare's translation reflects neither vision nor a close adherance to the Pali and messes up the imagry to the point of uselessness. Hare has especially botched up the simile for the fourth jhaana, and to complicate that either he has translated it backwards or there was an editorial error which reverses the meaning. The descriptions of the jhaanas and the similes that accompany them are not simply descriptions or recipes, they are also hypnotic suggestions which draw one into the jhaana. All their magic is lost if the repeated phrases are not repeated exactly and if the ordering of the words does not reflect the progressive deepening of the experience. See 'The First Burning' and following for my version.
In this sutta the fifth item (observing the sign) is one that is not seen elsewhere connected with sammaa samaadhi or the mastery of higher powers and it's meaning here is subject to question. There is no support in the sutta itself for the idea that this is paying attention to a concentration device, or the so called 'reflex image,' or to the subject of one's meditation. I believe the key is in the simile which is of a man observing another man while standing, observing while standing another man who is sitting, and sitting observing another man who is lying down. I believe what is being observed is the body and it's state of serenity and that there is, in the idea of 'a man', a symbolic imagry for memonic purposes which is humorous. Note that the final, always the highest state, is supine.

PTS: The Five-Limbed, Hare, trans., III.17
ATI: The Factors of Concentration, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 28. Five-Factored, 647

#29. Ca'nkamaa-Nisa.msa Sutta.m, III.29

Five advantages to be gained from use of a place to pace.

PTS: The Alley-Walk, Hare, trans., III.21
BD: The Place to Pace; Pali text, vocabulary, discussion, Olds trans., pic.
The Place to Pace, Olds, trans.
ATI: Walking, Aggacitta Bhikkhu and Kumara Bhikkhu, trans.
WP: 29. Walking Meditation, 651

#30. Nagita Sutta.m, III.30

The Buddha explains to his attendant Nagita why he will not accept the food-gifts of a large number of people who have gathered together to do him homage on hearing of his arival in their town.
It is interesting to try and understand the reasoning here as elsewhere the Buddha goes to great lengths to encourage giving. The distinction appears to be that these people have not arrived to hear Dhamma, but only to 'see' the Buddha and make merit by giving their gifts.
The key word to understand in this sutta is samaagama. Hare: 'homage'; Bhk. Thanissaro: 'honor'; Bhk. Bodhi: 'fame', PED: 'intercourse. sa'n= own, with, con; aagama = to cause to come. In the text Gotama indicates that it is a word for gains, honors, and fame. I think 'homage' covers more of this territory than 'honor' or 'fame.' Gotama apparently perceives the motives of the group as consisting of empty homage.
We know from the fact that Naagita was at this time Gotama's attendant, that this is an early event, so this supports the idea that in the early stages of the Buddha's career the meditation practice of choice was apparently the contemplation of the unpleasant and the disadvantages of existence rather than minding the breathing.
We don't know much about Naagita except that he was supposed to have been fat and lazy. See also: AN 6.42 and AN 8.86

PTS: The Venerable Nagita, Hare, trans., III.21
ATI: To Nagita, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 30. Naagita, 651

IV. Sumanaa Vagga, III.32

PTS: Sumanaa,Hare, trans., III.24
WP: Sumanaa, 653

#31. Sumanaa Sutta.m, III.32

Sumana, Raja Pasanadi's sister, has waited a long time to join the order as she first felt the need to take care of her grandmother. Before even she is initiated she becomes a non-returner and then an arahant. In this sutta she asks the Buddha about the results of making gifts.

PTS: Sumanaa, the Rajah's Daughter, Hare, trans., III.24
BD: discussion
Princess Sweetmind, Olds, trans.
WP: 31. Sumanaa, 653

#32. Cundii Sutta.m, III.35

Cundi asks the Buddha about trust in what teacher, what Dhamma, what Order, what practices in ethical conduct yield the best results.

PTS: Cundi, the rajah's daughter, Hare, trans., III.26
WP: 32. Cundii, 655

#33. Uggaho Me.n.dakanattaa Sutta.m, III.36

Uggaha invites the Buddha to a meal to instruct his daughters in the behavior that will profit them in this life and the life hereafter.

PTS: Uggah, a Householder, Hare, trans., III.29
WP: 33. Uggaha, 657
Discussion

#34. Siihasenaapati Sutta.m, III.38

Siha the General asks the Buddha if there is any visible result of giving. He is given five examples.

PTS: Siiha, the general, Hare, trans., III.31
ATI: To General Siha (On Generosity), Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
BD: discussion
General Lionheart, Olds, trans.
WP: 34. Siiha, 659

#35. Daanaa-Nisa.msa Sutta.m, III.41

Five advantages to be gained as a result of giving.

PTS: The Advantages from Gifts, Hare, trans., III.32
BD: discussion
Advantage, Olds, trans.
WP: 35. The Benefits of Giving, 660

#36. Kaaladaana Sutta.m, III.41

Five occasions when it is the right time to give.

PTS: The Timely Gift, Hare, trans., III.33
ATI: Seasonable Gifts, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
BD: discussion
The Right Time, Olds, trans.
WP: 36. Timely, 661

#37. Bhojana Sutta.m, III.42

Five benefits from giving food to a bhikkhu.

PTS: The Gift of a Meal, Hare, trans., III.34
ATI: A Meal, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
BD: discussion
The Food Giver
WP: 37. Food, 662

#38. Saddha Sutta.m, III.42

Five advantages of faith in the Buddha, Dhamma and Sangha.

PTS: The Advantages of Believing, Hare, trans., III.34
ATI: Conviction, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 38. Faith, 662

#39. Putta Sutta.m, III.43

Five thoughts in the minds of those who wish for a son.
It is interesting that 'carrying on the family's name,' the reason given for such a wish one hears most frequently here today [USA Saturday, July 05, 2014 4:57 AM] is not one of these. I wonder where and why the idea of giving the names of both male and female lines fell off. Ancient India and some cultures, and the ancient European aristocracy preserve this system. There was a movement here for a while to use hyphonated names, but I believe this was more a desire to appear aristocratic than to restore gender equality and for that reason it seems to have been a passing fad.

PTS: They Desire a Son, Hare, trans., III.35
WP: 39. Son, 663

#40. Mahaa Saala Sutta.m, III.44

Supported by a clan chief that has faith, a family grows in five ways.

PTS: Sal Trees, Hare, trans., III.36
WP: 40. Sal Trees, 664

V. Mu.n.daraaja Vagga, III.45

PTS: Raajah Mu.n.da, Hare, trans., III.37
WP: Mu.nda the King, 665

#41. Pa~nca Bhogaaadiya Sutta.m, III.45

Wealth management for the Buddhist. Five steps to take to enjoy and protect one's wealth that leave one satisfied that one has done the best one could whether wealth increases or is lost.

PTS: On Getting Rich, Hare, trans., III.37
ATI: Benefits to be Obtained (from Wealth), Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
BD: On Make'n Mula - discussion
On Make'n Mula, Olds, trans.
WP: 41. Utilization, 665

#42. Sappurisa Sutta.m, III.46

When a good person is born into a family it brings advancement, benefits and happiness to many people.

PTS: The Good Man, Hare, trans., III.38
WP: 42. The Good Person, 667

#43. Pa~nca I.t.thadhamma Sutta.m, III.47

The Buddha tells Anathapindika, that long life, beauty, happiness, honor and rebirth in heaven hereafter is not to be got by prayers or wishing - one must walk the walk-to-walk ('patipada') to get these things.
Hare quotes the Commentary: living a generous, ethical life guided by wisdom. Elsewhere in the suttas themselves long life is said to be got through harmlessness, beauty through being good tempered, honor through non-envy and respect of others, and rebirth in heavon through giving and mental culture. Generosity alone is also mentioned as yielding all these results. And wisdom would guide one to doing all these things if for no other reason than covering one's bets.

PTS: What is Welcome, Hare, trans., III.39
ATI: What is Welcome, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 43. Wished For, 667

#44. Manaapadaayii Sutta.m, III.49

A sutta about Ugga the Housefather of Vesali who is a giver of good things in a very gracious manner.
Here is a good model of how to give and receive.

PTS: The Giver of Good Things, Hare, trans., III.40
WP: 44. The Giver of the Agreeable, 669

#45. Pu~n~naabhisanda Sutta.m, III.51

Five gifts that when given to a bhikkhu who is able to attain unbounded serenity yield incalculably rich results. This sutta serves the double purpose of encouraging the layman to give and to admonish the bhikkhus to be worthy to receive. It illustrates the fact that the consequences of kamma do not rely solely on the actor.

PTS: Yields in merit, Hare, trans., III.42
WP: 45. Streams, 671

#46. Pa~nca Sampadaa Sutta.m, III.53

Five things which are real achievements when brought to perfection.

PTS: The Perfectings, Hare, trans., III.44
WP: 46. Accomplishments, 672

#47. Pa~nca Dhana Sutta.m, III.53

Five things which should be considered treasures.

PTS: Treasures, Hare, trans., III.44
WP: 47. Wealth, 672

#48, Alabbhaniiya.thaana Sutta.m, III.54

The distinction between the disciples of Gotama and the commoner in facing aging, sickness and death, passing away, and dissapearance.

PTS: States Not To Be Got To, Hare, trans., III.45
BD: The Unattainable, Olds, trans.
WP: 48. Situations, 674

#49. Kosala Sutta.m, III.57

Pasenadi, king of Kosala is visiting the Buddha when he is told of the death of his chief Queen, Mallika. He is very upset and Gotama instructs him with the distinction between the disciples of Gotama and the commoner in facing aging, sickness and death, passing away, and dissapearance.
The instruction is identical with the previous sutta. It is very difficult for us in the West to see how this sort of response to a person in grief could be understood as compassion. I have personally faced the situation and not been able to respond as directly as in this example. The best I could come up with was to say that "In the ancient system of the Buddha the response to a person in grief was to say something like 'It is the destiny of all personal things to come to an end.' And then explain that however much grief might be being felt, what it came down to was that this was not grief for the dead person, but grief for the self missing the companionship of the dead person, and that by letting go of this display of grief he would be saving himself useless and embarassing display of self-pity. The idea that the display of grief is a joy to one's enemies and a pain to one's friends is also a strong argument in this situation.

PTS: The Kosalan, Hare, trans., III.
ATI: The Kosalan, Hecker and Sister Khema, trans.
The Kosalan, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 49. Kosala, 676

#50. Naarada Sutta.m, III.57

The Venerable Narada instructs rajah Munda with a sutta that draws the distinction between the disciples of Gotama and the commoner in facing aging, sickness and death, passing away, and dissapearance.
The sutta that is given to rajah Mu.n.da is identical to that of the previous two suttas, and the circumstance is similar to the previous sutta, but this is happening many years later and the king is the great grandson of Ajaatasattu. In SN 2.12.68 we see Bhk. Naarada before he became arahant.

PTS: The Venerable Naarada, Hare, trans., III.
WP: 50. Naarada, 677

VI. Niivara.na Vagga, III.63

PTS: The Hindrances, Hare, trans., III.51
WP: Hindrances, 679

#51. Niivara.na Sutta.m, III.63

The Buddha likens a person mastered by wishing for sense pleasure, hate, lazy ways and inertia, fear and trembling, and doubt and vacillation (the Nivaranas - diversions) to a stream which has been diverted and no longer has it's original strength or free will. Then he likens a person who has mastered desire for sense pleasures, hatred, lazy ways and inertia, fear and trembling and doubt and vacillation to a stream whose diversions have been closed off and which has regained its strength and free will.
Once again the simile points the way to the correct translation of 'nivarana', that is, 'diversion' or that which diverts. The majority of translators use 'hindrance', but it can be seen from the simile that what is being spoken of is not an obstruction (another translation that has been used) but something that is syphoning off the forward momentum of the stream. I think we can see here a difference in the mentality of this day and age [USA, Sunday, July 13, 2014 11:47 AM A.D.] from that of the followers of Gotama in his day and age [c.500 B.C.], that is the tendency to put off our problems onto the world or others. That which obstructs does not involve the will of the individual or necessarily reduce his strength and freedom, whereas diversions are by their nature participated in by the individual and to whatever degree that is so weaken his strength and diminish his individual willpower.

PTS: A Check, Hare, trans., III.51
ATI: Obstacles, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 51. Obstructions, 679

#52. Akusalaraasi Sutta.m, III.65

The Buddha declares the diversions as a constillation of the unskillful. See also for this: SN 5.47.5

PTS: The Heap, Hare, trans., III.53
WP: 52. A Heap, 680

#53. Padhaaniya'nga Sutta.m, III.65

The Buddha describes five personal dimensions to making effort.

PTS: The Limbs, Hare, trans., III.53
ATI: Factors (for Exertion), Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 53. Factors, 681

#54. Asamaya - Samaya Sutta.m, III.65

The Buddha describes features of the seasonable and unseasonable time for making effort.

PTS: Times for Striving, Hare, trans., III.54
WP: 54. Occasions, 681
Discussion

#55. Maataa-Putta Sutta.m, III.67

A mother and son bhikkhu and bhikkhuni engaging in incest is the occasion for a lecture on the dangers of womankind.
See on this the very similar opening to the Book of the Ones.

PTS: Mother and Son, Hare, trans., III.55
WP: 55. Mother and Son, 682

#56. Upajjhaaya Sutta.m, III.69

A bhikkhu is discouraged and has become befuddled. Taken to the Buddha by his preceptor he is given instructions as to how to guard the senses, be moderate in eating, live intent on wakefulness, and to cultivate day and night his understanding of the way.

PTS: The preceptor, Hare, trans., III.57
WP: 56. Preceptor, 684

#57. .Thaana Sutta.m, III.71

The Buddha urges everyone interested in their own salvation to give contemplation to aging, being subject to sickness and death, changeability and separation from the things we love, and the idea that one's deeds return to one in kind. He further explains why it is important to think of these things and the way to think of these things that will bring about escape from them.

PTS: Things To Be Contemplated, Hare, trans., III.59
ATI: Subjects for Contemplation, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 57. Themes, 686

#58. Licchavi Kumaara Sutta.m, III.75

A gang of young toughs out hunting come upon the Buddha and are inspired to pay reverence. An elder of their clan is astounded and remarks as to how they will become like a neighbouring clan of gentle manners. The Buddha then, within earshot of the youths, teaches him about the advantages of paying reverance to mother and father, wife and children, workers, gods and holy men.

PTS: The Licchavi Young Men, Hare, trans., III.62
WP: 58. Licchavi Youths, 689

#59. Pa.thama Vu.d.dhapabbajita Sutta.m, III.78

The Buddha lists five attributes hard to find in a bhikkhu who has joined the order when old.

PTS: Hard to Find (a), Hare, trans., III.64
WP: 59. Gone Forth in Old Age (1), 692

#60. Dutiya Vu.d.dhapabbajita Sutta.m, III.78

The Buddha lists five attributes hard to find in a bhikkhu who has joined the order when old. A different set of five.
We must take these not as a put down of old men, but as encouragement to the young to take advantage of their youth. Habits are hard to change and take a long time, starting when old is either going to require extraordinary effort or will end in very little being accomplished. There are a number of cases where an older person (male and female) have left the world and almost immediately become arahant. These are often obviously people who have been working on themselves for a long time as laymen or ascetics of other cults.

PTS: Hard to Find (b), Hare, trans., III.65
WP: 60. Gone Forth in Old Age (2), 692

VII. Sa~n~naa Vagga, III.79

PTS: Thoughts, Hare, trans., III.65
WP: Perceptions, 693

#61. Pa.thama Sa~n~naa Sutta.m, III.79

Five things which if they can be well perceived are very helpful in attaining the deathless.
Hare says of 'sa~n~naa' "as vague a term as is popularly our 'thought.'" But the idea is not 'thinking about' a thing but seeing these qualities in things. Read Hare's translation in conjunction with my own to see the difference in direction. Thinking about these things will result in 'knowing and seeing' (intellectual understanding; seeing the water at the bottom of the well, but without the means to drink) whereas perception of these qualities in things will result in 'knowing in body'. Release, or Freedom is only attained on knowing in body.

PTS: Thoughts (a), Hare, trans., III.65
BD: First Perceptions Sutta, Olds, trans.
WP: 61. Perceptions (1), 693

#62. Dutiya Sa~n~naa Sutta.m, III.79

Five things which if they can be well perceived are very helpful in attaining the deathless.

PTS: Thoughts (b), Hare, trans., III.66
BD: Second Perceptions Sutta, Olds, trans.
WP: 62. Perceptions (2), 693

#63. Pa.thama Va.d.dhii Sutta.m, III.80

Five things which if they are developed are very helpful to growth in the Buddhist system.

PTS: Growth, Hare, trans., III.66
WP: 63. Growth (1), 693

#64. Dutiya Va.d.dhii Sutta.m, III.80

Five things which if they are developed are very helpful to growth in the Buddhist system.

PTS: Growth (b), Hare, trans., III.66
ATI: Growth, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 64. Growth (2), 693

#65. Ala.msaakaccha Sutta.m, III.81

Qualifications for giving dissertations on five topics of Dhamma: ethical conduct, serenity (samadhi), wisdom (panna), freedom and knowing and seeing freedom.
This comes down to the fact that one should have the experience one is talking about, be able to explain that experience and be able to answer questions in response to issues that arise in relation to that experience.

PTS: Talk, Hare, trans., III.66
WP: 65. Discussion, 694

#66. Ala.msaajiiva Sutta.m, III.81

Five qualifications for setting a good example to one's fellows in the holy life.
A twist on the previous sutta.

PTS: An Example, Hare, trans., III.67
WP: 66. Way of Live, 694

#67. Pa.thama Iddhipaada Sutta.m, III.81

The Buddha states that anyone making an extraordinary effort to develop and make a big thing of the four bases of magic power can expect either awakening here or non-returning.

PTS: Psychic Power (a), Hare, trans., III.67
WP: 67. Bases for Psychic Potency (1), 695

#68. Dutiya Iddhipaada Sutta.m, III.82

The Buddha relates his efforts to develop and his successful experience of psychic power when he was still a bodhisat.
This is but one of several different descriptions The Buddha relates of the method he used to attain arahantship. Is there contradiction in this? No. There is overlap. These are different ways of describing the same events. For example, see if you can see how understanding the satisfaction, the danger, and the escape from the six-fold sense sphere is the same thing as developing and experiencing psychic power culminating in the destruction of the asavas. Then do the same thing with the experience of the Paticca Samuppada, the Four Aristocratic Truths, the Four Settings up of Mind, the Seven Dimensions of Self-Awakening, etc.

PTS: Psychic Power (b), Hare, trans., III.68
WP: 68. Bases for Psychic Potency (2), 695

#69. Nibabidaa Sutta.m, III.83

If a person can develop and make a big thing of the idea of their being nothing attractive in the body, the disgusting nature of food, the thought of distaste for the world, the perception of impermanance in everything that has been own-made, and has established in his mind the thought of death, he may expect Arahantship even in this life.
The final phrase: maranasanna kho pan'assa ajjhattam supatthita hoti, translated by Hare: "...and the thought of death is by him inwardly well established," accords with the usual understanding. My interpretation is that this term "ajjhattam" is used to avoid the term "his own" or "own" "personal". But here it may have lead to a misunderstanding of the intent, which I believe is the fact that one has come to see that "My own body" too will die, has not risen above that state, is subject to such an end as that. See: Satipatthana, Charnal Ground.

PTS: Disgust, Hare, trans., III.68
BD: Extreme Satisfaction, Olds, trans.
WP: 69. Disenchantment, 696

#70. Aasavakkhaya Sutta.m, III.83

The development and making a big thing of the idea of their being nothing attractive in the body, the disgusting nature of food, the thought of distaste for the world, the perception of impermanance in everything that has been own-made, and the establishment in mind of the thought of death leads to the destruction of the corrupting influences.

PTS: Distruction of the Cankers, Hare, trans., III.68
WP: 70. Destruction of the Taints, 696

VIII. Yodhaajiiva Vagga, III.84

PTS: The Warrior, III.69
WP: Future Perils, 696

#71. Pa.thama Ceto-Vimutti-Phala Sutta.m, III.84

The Buddha describes how the development and making a big thing of the idea of their being nothing attractive in the body, the disgusting nature of food, the thought of distaste for the world, the perception of impermanance in everything that has been own-made, and the establishment in mind of the thought of death has its fruition in freedom of heart and the advantages of freedom of heart and freedom of wisdom and the advantages of freedom of wisdom.

PTS: The Fruits of Mind-Emancipation (a), Hare, trans., III.69
WP: 71. Liberation of Mind (1), 696
Discussion

#72. Dutiya Ceto-Vimutti-Phala Sutta.m, III.85

The Buddha describes how the development and making a big thing of the idea of impermanence, the idea of pain in impermanence, the idea of not-self in pain, the idea of giving up, and the idea of dispassion have their fruition in freedom of heart and the advantages of freedom of heart and freedom of wisdom and the advantages of freedom of wisdom.

PTS: The Fruits of Mind-Emancipation (b), Hare, trans., III.70
WP: 72. Liberation of Mind (2), 698

#73. Pa.thama Dhammavihaarii Sutta.m, III.86

The Buddha explains the full scope of the idea of 'living by Dhamma.' Its not by knowledge of Dhamma, or teaching, or repetition, or analysis, but by putting it into practice in calming the self.

PTS: Living by Dhamma, (a) Hare, trans., III.70
ATI: One Who Dwells in the Dhamma, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
BD: Walk'n the Talk - Discussion
Walk'n the Talk, Olds, trans.
WP: 73. One Who Dwells in the Dhamma (1), 698

#74. Dutiya Dhammavihaarii Sutta.m, III.88

The Buddha explains the meaning of 'living in the Dhamma'. It is not enough to study the suttas, teach the Dhamma, repeat the suttas, think about the Dhamma, but one must also have the wisdom to grasp the attainment of the goal itself.
My version of this incorporates the idea of going-apart found in the AN 5.73 variation on this sutta and summarizes including all the steps. This appears to me to be the way it was intended to have been presented because of the way the final paragraph is worded in the Pali, which looks like an incomplete unabridgment. I have therefore called this, and my version of AN 5.73 'retellings'.
A significant feature of this sutta is the fact that the attainment of the goal is through the application of wisdom (pa~n~naa). Wisdom is a matter of taking known knowledge and experience and coming up with a solution to a problem, answer to a question, method for attaining a goal; knowing what to do. It isn't really the discovery of anything new, such as with insight. It is more a matter of having the heart for the attainment. The use of will-power and resolution to overcome reluctance to attain what one already knows can be attained and how it can be attained. Here we have an explanation for the idea of 'sudden awakening' for which we have an example in Ananda's awakening at the last minute before he is called upon to recite Dhamma at the first council where he thinks to himself that he himself ought to become Arahant before joining this auspicious assembly of arahants, and he becomes arahant there and then.

PTS: Living by Dhamma, (b), Hare, trans., III.72
BD:Walk'n the Talk, The Second Olds, trans.
WP: 74. One Who Dwells in the Dhamma (2), 699

#75. Pa.thama Yodhaajiivuupama Sutta.m, III.89

The Buddha likens the struggle to awaken to a battle, and enumerates five sorts of warriors and their parallels in the community of bhikkhus.
Bhk. Thanissaro notes that this discourse is directed at the bhikkhus and speculates that the image of the warrior was designed to appeal to masculine pride and that perhaps some other approach would have been taken with the bhikknuni's. I would point to the way the members of Don Juan's group, so closely aligned with the ancient tradition of the warrior, male and female alike all took pride in the warrior image. History, from ancient times down to gang warfare in New York City in the early 1900s, gives us plenty of examples of women warriors. Here this struggle for awakening is as much a battle for women as for men. The appeal, in the use of the warrior image, is to the courage of the warrior, not his masculinity. The appeal to feminists as well as to male chauvenists is to put sexual identification to the side. Both sexes are the devil to the other.

PTS: The Warrior a, Hare, trans., III.73
ATI: The Warrior (1), Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 75. Warriors (1), 700

#76. Dutiya Yodhaajiivuupama Sutta.m, III.93

The Buddha likens the struggle to awaken to a battle, and enumerates five sorts of warriors and their parallels in the community of bhikkhus.

PTS: The Warrior b, Hare, trans., III.77
ATI: The Warrior (2), Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 76. Warriors (2), 704

#77. Pa.thama Anaagatabhaya Sutta.m, III.100

The Buddha describes five fearsome dangers of the forest-gone bhikkhu that should inspire him to make great effort.
The Pali for Hare's 'in the way', and Bhks. Bodhi and Thanissaro's 'Future' is 'anaagata', non-got, which the passages in this sutta suggest might be better translated 'possible.'

PTS: Fear in the Way a, Hare, trans., III.81
ATI: The Discourses on Future Dangers, 1 Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 77. Future Perils (1), 709

#78. Dutiya Anaagatabhaya Sutta.m, III.103

The Buddha describes five fearsome dangers for the bhikkhu that should inspire him to make great effort.
In the previous sutta the dangers described were for the forest-gone bhikkhu; here the dangers are ones common to all bhikkhus ... all of us, for that matter.

PTS: Fear in the Way b, Hare, trans., III.82
ATI: The Discourses on Future Dangers, 2 Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 78. Future Perils (2), 710

#79. Tatiya Anaagatabhaya Sutta.m, III.105

The Buddha describes five fearsome dangers for the bhikkhus that will arise in the future that should inspire them to make great effort.
Here the dangers are distinctly future dangers. And we can see for ourselves the accuracy of the prediction. It's not too late bhikkhus! Today [Saturday, August 02, 2014 6:48 AM]) we are seeing the Dhamma as it really is being published abroad in every language in easily accessible, free, digital form for all to see. The world is now able to see your behavior and your doctrines through the lens of Dhamma as it was actually taught. Take a care for your destiny! Make effort. Re-establish the old ways that are intent on the goal, grounded in Sutta, grounded in Vinaya.

PTS: Fear in the Way c, Hare, trans., III.84
ATI: The Discourses on Future Dangers, 3 Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 79. Future Perils (3), 713

#80. Catuttha Anaagatabhaya Sutta.m, III.108

The Buddha describes five fearsome dangers for the bhikkhus that will arise in the future that should inspire them to make great effort.

PTS: Fear in the Way d, Hare, trans., III.86
ATI: The Discourses on Future Dangers, 4 Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 80. Future Perils (4), 715

IX. Thera Vagga, III.110

PTS: The Elder, Hare, trans., III.87
WP: Elders, 716

#81. Raajaniya Sutta.m, III.110

Five pairs of opposites which determine whether or not a bhikkhu is found likeable, pleasant, respectable and becoming.

PTS: Enticing, Hare, trans., III.87
WP: 81. Provoking Lust, 716

#82. Viitaraaga Sutta.m, III.111

Five pairs of opposites which determine whether or not a bhikkhu is found likeable, pleasant, respectable and becoming.

PTS: Free of Passion, Hare, trans., III.88
WP: 82. Devoid of Lust, 717

#83. Kuhaka Sutta.m, III.111

Five pairs of opposites which determine whether or not a bhikkhu is found likeable, pleasant, respectable and becoming.

PTS: The Trickster, Hare, trans., III.88
WP: 83. Schemer, 717

#84. Assaddha Sutta.m, III.112

Five pairs of opposites which determine whether or not a bhikkhu is found likeable, pleasant, respectable and becoming.

PTS: Faith, Hare, trans., III.88
WP: 84. Devoid of Faith, 717

#85. Akkhama Sutta.m, III.112

Five pairs of opposites which determine whether or not a bhikkhu is found likeable, pleasant, respectable and becoming.

PTS: He Cannot Endure, Hare, trans., III.88
WP: 85. Cannot Patiently Endure, 718

#86. Pa.tisamgidaa Sutta.m, III.113

Five pairs of opposites which determine whether or not a bhikkhu is found likeable, pleasant, respectable and becoming.

PTS: Analysis, Hare, trans., III.89
WP: 86. Analytical Knowledges, 718

#87. Siila Sutta.m, III.113

Five pairs of opposites which determine whether or not a bhikkhu is found likeable, pleasant, respectable and becoming.

PTS: Virtue, Hare, trans., III.89
WP: 87. Virtuous, 718

#88. Thera Sutta.m, III.114

The Buddha explains that it is the viewpoint of an elder, not his learning of the suttas, even to the point of understanding both letter and spirit, that makes him a benefit to the world or results in him misleading multitudes to their harm.

PTS: The elder, Hare, trans., III.90
BD: Sassana, Hare trans., discussion
WP: 88. An Elder, 719

#89. Pa.thama Sekha Sutta.m, III.116

Five pairs of opposites which determine whether or not a bhikkhu still in training will decline or prosper.

PTS: The Monk in Training a, Hare, trans., III.91
WP: 89. A Trainee (1), 720

#90. Dutiya Sekha Sutta.m, III.116

Five pairs of opposites which determine whether or not a bhikkhu still in training will decline or prosper.

PTS: The Monk in Training b, Hare, trans., III.91
WP: 90. A Trainee (2), 721

X. Kakudha Vagga, III.118

PTS: Kakudha, Hare, trans., III.92
WP: Kakudha, 722

#91. Pa.thama Sampadaa Sutta.m, III.118

Five perfections: of faith, ethical behavior, learning, generosity, and wisdom.
The key term here is 'sampadaa'. PED has: 1. attainment, success, accomplishment; happiness, good fortune; blessing, bliss ... in its pregnant meaning is applied to the accomplishments of the individual in the course of his religious development.
The literal meaning is 'on track' which I think reveals the intent. The term must allow for a dual - worldly, unworldly - understanding; there is that which is perfection/success/accomplishment/good fortune in worldly matters and there is that which is perfection, etc. in accordance with the Dhamma. Here Gotama is saying that the measure of what is perfection is whether or not the practice accords with (or is on track with) Dhamma.

PTS: Achievements, (a) Hare, trans., III.92
WP: 91. Accomplishments (1), 722

#92. Dutiya Sampadaa Sutta.m, III.119

Five perfections: of ethical behavior, serenity, wisdom, freedom, knowing and seeing freedom.

PTS: Achievements, (b) Hare, trans., III.92
WP: 92. Accomplishments (2), 723

#93. A~n~navyaakara.na Sutta.m, III.119

Five ways in which knowing is declared.

PTS: Avowal, Hare, trans., III.92
WP: 93. Declarations, 723

#94. Phaasuvihaara Sutta.m, III.119

Five abodes where comfort can be found.

PTS: Comfort, Hare, trans., III. 93
WP: 94. Dwelling at Ease, 723

#95. Pa.thama Akuppa Sutta.m, III.119

Five practices that conduce to attaining unshakability.

PTS: The immovable, Hare, trans., III.93
WP: 95. The Unshakable, 723

#96. Sutadhara Sutta.m, III.120

Five practices which should accompany minding the breath which greatly facilitate penetration of the unshakable.

PTS: The learned, Hare, trans., III.93
ATI: One Who Retains What He Has Heard, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
BD: Sutta-Bearer, Olds, trans.
WP: 96. What One Has Learned, 724

#97. Tatiya Akuppa Sutta.m, III.120

Five things which should be cultivated along with minding the breaths.

PTS: Talk, Hare, trans., III.94
ATI: Talk, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 97. Talk, 724

#98. Catuttha Akuppa Sutta.m, III.121

Five things which should be cultivated along with minding the breaths.

PTS: Forest, Hare, trans., III.94
ATI: Wilderness, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 98. A Forest Dweller, 724

#99. Siiha Sutta.m, III.121

The Buddha teaches the need to act skillfully in even the smallest things by way of comparing the way he teaches Dhamma with the way the Lion strikes at even the smallest game, that is, with consummate skill.

"Sir Joshua Reynolds once asked him [Johnson] by what means he had attained his extraordinary accuacy and flow of language. He told him, that he had early laid it down as a fixed rule to do his best on every occasion, and in evey company: to impart whatever he knew in the most foceible language he could put it in; and that by constant practice, and never sffering any careless expressions to escape him, or attempting to deliver his thoughts without arranging them in the clearest manner, it became habitual to him."
Boswell, The Life of Dr. Johnson, London, 1791.

A short sutta but one that teaches an extremely helpful discipline. Hare translates the Lion's reason for his care no matter what the prey by 'Let not my skill fail me!' but it would be better as 'Let not my skill deteriorate!'. The lesson is that the important thing is the skill with which one acts, not the circumstances in which one acts. Lazy habits infect one's entire practice. This world is like a vast swiftly-flowing river; a slight change in a small object may not appear to have an immediate effect, but in a short time it will have exerted some influence on every molecule of that on-going flow. Beings are the inheritors of their deeds.

PTS: Lion, Hare, trans., III.94
WP: 99. The Lion, 725

#100. Kakudha Sutta.m, III.122

Maha Moggallana is visited by a deva who tells him of Devadatta's secret ambition to rule the sangha. When he relates this to the Buddha, the Buddha discourses on the various sorts of teachers that need the protection of their disciples and he declares himself not to need such protections.

PTS: Kakudha, Hare, trans., III.95
WP: 100. Kakudha, 725
Discussion

XI. Phaasuvihaara Vagga, III.127

PTS: The Abodes of Comfort, Hare, trans., III.97
WP: Dwelling at Ease, 728

#101. Sekhavesaarajja Sutta.m, III.127

Five things that overcome fear in the beginner.
A simple but powerful message. What is being spoken about is the eradication of all fear whatsoever.

PTS: The Fearful, Hare, trans., III.97
WP: 101. Timidity, 728

#102. Sa'nkita Sutta.m, III.128

Five places which if habitually visited by a bhikkhu lead to him being suspected of having an evil nature regardless of his real accomplishments.

PTS: Suspected, Hare, trans., III.98
WP: 102. Suspected, 729

#103. Mahaa Cora Sutta.m, III.128

Five devices of the great robber compared to five devices of the evil bhikkhu.
Nit: Hare translates 'Mahaa Cora' as 'Robber Chief' in the text. This is not a description of the ways a robber becomes chief of the robbers, but of the ways a robber makes himself powerful. The simile needs to parallel the thing it is illuminating. Also it is misleading to beginning students of the Pali to translate 'mahaa' 'Chief' where this is not the meaning anywhere else.

PTS: The Robber, Hare, trans., III.98
WP: 103. A Thief, 729

#104. Sama.na Sukhumaala Sutta.m, III.130

The Buddha lists five things which make a bhikkhu one who is a garland for bhikkhus.
In this sutta Gotama uses himself as an example of a bhikkhu who embodies various qualities which make a bhikkhu a garland for bhikkhus. Self-praise is not a quality which is held in high esteem, so how do we excuse this in the Buddha? By understnding the realization of not-self as having been truly accomplished in him, hence it is not self-praise, it is the praise of the phenomena of 'Buddha', Awakening. He speaks of himself as though of another person. A sutta like this should be used to inspire faith in the reader. Think of how difficult, stupid and transparently phoney (uninspiring) it would be for one to make statements like this if this were not the case of an individual speaking of himself like this without being completely without ego. This is also a good example of how naturally 'conventional speech' is to be used.

PTS: He Who Graces, Hare, trans., III.100
WP: 104. Delicate, 731

#105. Phaasuvihaara Sutta.m, III.132

Five things that make for comfortable living for the bhikkhu.

PTS: Comfort, Hare, trans., III.102
WP: 105. At Ease, 732

#106. Aananda Sutta.m, III.132

Ananda inquires about the conditions that make for comfortable living in monastery life.
The message is essentially that when the bhikkhus attend to their own development and otherwise mind their own business the bhikkhus dwell in comfort.

PTS: The Venerable Aananda, Hare, trans., III.102
DTO: Comfortably, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 106. Aananda, 733

#107. Siila-Sampanna Sutta.m, III.134

Five things that make a bhikkhu worthy of reverence: accomplishment in ethical conduct, serenity, wisdom, freedom and knowledge and vision of freedom.

PTS: Virtue, Hare, trans., III.103
WP: 107. Virtuous Behavior, 734

#108. Asekha Sutta.m, III.134

Five things that make the adept worthy of reverence: having mastered the whole body of ethical conduct, serenity, wisdom, freedom and knowledge and vision of freedom.
This is not, as Hare would have it, not needing to train; this is the situation of one who has already mastered the training. Contrasted to the previous the idea is that the bhikkhu that is earnestly studying is worthy as here one who is an adept is worthy. Being in the condition of beggars, the bhikkhus are constantly being reminded by Gotama to be worthy of accepting their sustanance from those who labor for their living. There is a huge respect for the weight, that is to say, difficulty, of sustaining life, which is to say, the bearing of pain for life's sake. It is enough to do it for one's self and family; to do it for an unworthy stranger is heroic. 'Worthy' meaning that the kammic rebound should greatly exceed that of an ordinary person; a thing which is effected by detachment, which is the result of virtue, etc. For the unworthy, bumming off the labors of others is a swift road to hell and is especially so for the bhikkhus of Gotama's Sangha because in this case there is a high expectation of bountiful return (one gets to see and experience the pain and disappointment one has allowed another to suffer for one ... multiplied a few hundred thousand fold).

PTS: No Need to Train, Hare, trans., III.104
WP: 108. One Beyond Training, 734

#109. Caatuddisa Sutta.m, III.135

With five things one can be said to have such complete freedom of movement as to be termed 'A Four-Directioner': perfect ethical conduct, much learning, contentment with the essential, attainment of the four jhanas, and having destroyed the corrupting influence of lust, being and blindness.

PTS: The Four-Regioner, Hare, trans., III.104
WP: 109. At Home in the Four Quarters, 735

#110. Ara~n~na Sutta.m, III.135

Five things which are requisites of one who would live alone in the woods.
A variation on the previous substituting energy for being content with the essentials. Presumably the sort of individual who inclines to live alone in the woods is one who can handle deprivations.

PTS: The Forest, Hare, trans., III.105
WP: 110. Forest, 735

XII. Andhakavinda Vagga, III.136

PTS: Andhakavinda Hare, trans., III.105
WP: Andhakavinda 736

#111. Kulupaga Sutta.m, III.136

Five sorts of behavior that should be avoided by the bhikkhu that wishes to endear himself to householders.
A few pointers on etiquette for the bhikkhus that will also profit the householder to know.

PTS: The Clan-Goer, Hare, trans., III.105
WP: 111. A Visitor of Families, 736

#112. Pacchaasama.na Sutta.m, III.137

Bhk. Thanissaro
Bhk. Thanissaro and the bhikkhus of the Metta Forest
Monestary walking in line for alms.

Five characteristics recommended for bhikkhus who would walk behind their teacher on his begging round.
Presumably this serves at least two functions: the popularity of the teacher inspires the giving of more and better food, and the disciple becomes known as a follower of the popular teacher. Note the hair on these bhikkhus heads. The Bhikkhu is to shave his head only when the hair has grown two finger-widths in length.

PTS: The Recluse Who Walks Behind, Hare, trans., III.106
WP: 112. An Attendant Monk, 736

#113. Sammaa-Samaadhi Sutta.m, III.137

One who would get high needs to be able to overcome his reactions to the impact of stimuli on the five senses.
The key word here is 'khama'. PED: (a) patient, forgiving. (b) enduring, bearing, hardened to. To have patience with, etc. For example it is not conducive to getting high to be imagining machine-gunning a dog which has been barking for the past hour non-stop. One needs to overcome one's reactions to the sight of an attractive person of the opposite sex. The scent of food cooking on the bar-b-que next door. We need to be calm, cool, collected, impassive. Note that this list does not include stimulation of the mind. Why would this not be a problem? Because that which does not pertain to reactions to stimulus of the five senses is not a barrior to high serenity. As usual I object to the translation of Samaadhi as 'concentration.' Here the discussion is of High Samaadhi (Sammaa Samadhi) where what is being spoken of is the serenity that is a result of concentration among other things.

PTS: Concentration, Hare, trans., III.106
WP: 113. Concentration, 737
MISC: Tolerant, Kumara Bhikkhu trans.

#114, Andhakavinda Sutta.m, III.138

The Buddha teaches Ananda five things which he should teach to beginners.

PTS: At Andhakavinda, Hare, trans., III.106
ATI: At Andhakavinda Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 114. Andhakavinda 737

#115. Macchari Sutta.m, III.139

The Buddha warns against five things that result in a bhikkhuni being thrown into hell.

PTS: Begrudging, Hare, trans., III.108
WP: 115. Miserly, 738

#116. Va.n.na Sutta.m, III.139

The Buddha warns against five things that result in a bhikkhuni being thrown into hell.
A variation on the previous based on thinking before one speaks.

PTS: Praise, Hare, trans., III.108
WP: 116. Praise, 738

#117. Issuki Sutta.m, III.140

The Buddha warns against five things that result in a bhikkhuni being thrown into hell.
A variation on the previous substituting jealousy and meanness for showing faith in the unbelievable and disbelief in the believable.

PTS: Jealousy, Hare, trans., III.108
WP: 117. Envious, 739

#118. Micchaa-Di.t.thika Sutta.m, III.140

The Buddha warns against five things that result in a bhikkhuni being thrown into hell..
A variation on the previous substituting views and principles for showing jealousy and meanness.
I object to Hare's (and most other translators') 'right' for 'sammaa' because it's meaning as 'upright' or 'straight' is misunderstood to be 'the only correct thing' whereas the meaning is 'the best' or 'highest' or 'consummate' thing. The opposite of that 'micchaa' is misguided, low, contrary. Hare's use of 'wrong' shows exactly that his thinking is 'this is the right and all else is wrong'. And that is the problem, for it is that idea which has plagued mankind and especially religious freedom since forever. 'Sammaa' and 'micchaa' are concepts of efficacy relative to the Buddhist goal. There is no claim to absolute truth being made by the Magga. See the wording of the First Sutta: "...are ends not to be gone after by one embarking on the seeker's life." Dve me bhikkhave, antaa pabbajitena na sevitabbaa. See: discussion and Glossology: Sammaa. It's not a small irrelevant issue, it has to do with orientation. You can't get there going the wrong direction. (That's a statement relative to the goal!) If you believe 'this Way' is right and all other ways are wrong, you are attached to both the wrong and the consummate and misunderstand both and unless you let that position go you cannot achieve the detachment needed for freedom and the goal. Period. Words have power. The pen is mightier than the sward. Etc. "Right" and "Wrong" as absolutes have dealt nothing but grief to this world. Their use in Buddhist translations is out of place and entirely a consequence of the Early Christian-biased translations of the PTS such as this. Correcting the error is a matter of overcoming misplaced fear of and respect for the authority of the Oxford scholars. The Oxford scholars themselves would be the first to say they were fumbling in the dark and 2. we have evidence enough right here to see that they were all too human, not arahants, and subject to human error. The other hinderance to getting this ... um ... going in the optimal direction is that translators wish to avoid controversy and to find acceptance but this is nothing but pandering to the low minded and is no way to 'guide the flock'. We need to let these terms go!

PTS: Views, Hare, trans., III.108
WP: 118. View, 739

#119. Micchaa-Vaacaa Sutta.m, III.141

The Buddha warns against five things that result in a bhikkhuni being thrown into hell.
A variation on the previous substituting speech and works for views and principles.

PTS: Speech, Hare, trans., III.109
WP: 119. Speech, 739

#120. Micchaa-Vaayaama Sutta.m, III.141

The Buddha warns against five things that result in a bhikkhuni being thrown into hell.
A variation on the previous substituting self-control and memory for speech and works.
Note that with these last three suttas we have the 8-dimensional High Way minus Sammaa Ajiva (lifestyle) and Sammaa-Samadhi (serenity). Independantly conceptualized categories without mention of the Magga.

PTS: Effort, Hare, trans., III.109
WP: 120. Effort, 740

XIII. Gilaana Vagga, III.142

PTS: The Sick, Hare, trans., III.109
WP: Sick, 740

#121. Gilaana Sutta.m, III.142

If a sick person can keep in mind the idea of their being nothing attractive in the body, the disgusting nature of food, the thought of distaste for the world, the perception of impermanance in everything that has been own-made, and has established in his mind the thought of death, he may expect Arahantship even in this life.

PTS: A Sick Man, Hare, trans., III.109
ATI: To a Sick Man, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 121. Sick, 740

#122. Sati-Suupa.t.thita Sutta.m, III.143

Five things which result in either arahantship here or non-returning for the one who fully develops them.

PTS: The Arising of Mindfulness, Hare, trans., III.110
WP: 122. Establishment of Mindfulness, 740

#123. Duupa.t.thaaka-Gilaana Sutta.m, III.143

Five things which make a person helpful to himself when sick.

PTS: On Helping a, Hare, trans., III.110
WP: 123. An Attendant (1), 741

#124. Gilaan'uupa.t.thaaka Sutta.m, III.144

Five things which make a person helpful to others who are sick.

PTS: On Helping b, Hare, trans., III.110
WP: 124. An Attendant (2), 741

#125. Pa.thama Aayussa Sutta.m, III.145

Five things that contribute to ill health, five that contribute to good health.

PTS: Health Shall Spring Forth a, Hare, trans., III.111
WP: 125. Vitality (1), 742

#126. Dutiya Aayussa Sutta.m, III.145

Five things that contribute to ill health, five that contribute to good health.

PTS: Health Shall Spring Forth b, Hare, trans., III.111
WP: 126. Vitality (2), 742

#127. Vapakaasa Sutta.m, III.145

The Buddha gives five things that should be mastered before a bhikkhu goes into seclusion.

PTS: On withdrawing, Hare, trans., III.111
WP: 127. Living Apart, 743

#128. Sama.na-Dukkha-Sukha Sutta.m, III.146

Five things which are the special pains of a bhikkhu and five things which are the special pleasures of a bhikkhu.

PTS: The Ills of a Recluse, Hare, trans., III.112
WP: 128. An Ascetic's Happiness, 743

#129. Parikuppa Sutta.m, III.146

Five deeds which result in rebirth in hell for the duration of a world cycle.

PTS: Festering, Hare, trans., III.112
ATI: In Agony, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 129. Lesions, 743

#130. Sampadaa Sutta.m, III.147

Five losses experienced by people in the world: loss of relatives, loss of wealth, loss through sickness, loss of ethical conduct, loss of perspective. Only loss of ethical conduct and perspective land one in Hell.

PTS: Profit, Hare, trans., III.112
ATI: Being Consummate, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 130. Accomplishments, 744

XIV. Raaja Vagga, III.147

PTS: The Rajah, Hare, trans., III.113
WP: Kings, 744

#131. Pa.thama Cakkaanuvattana Sutta.m, III.147

The Buddha compares the rule of a monarch and the Teacher to the rolling of wheels. The factors that make for the lasting rule of a monarch are similar to those that made for the lasting of the Dhamma.
Hare has both the monarch and the Tathagata knowing Dhamma with a capital 'D'. This is probably the way this should be done throughout. We capitalize 'Tao.' Both the King and the Tathagata follow 'good form', which was known as 'the Dhamma'. What Gotama taught was that Dhamma as he saw it hense it came to be known as 'the Dhamma'. We should probably say 'The Dhamma according to Gotama' when speaking specifically of the teachings, but reverence for Gotama as well as appreciation for the perfect conformity of the Teachings with Good Form have blurred the difference. Otherwise when the meaning of the term is an ordinary thing, we should use lower case.
Hare cites the commentary when explaining the understanding of what 'knowing times' means. This needs to be understood in the case of the Monarch as knowing the appropriate time to speek or maintain silence (when an idea will best be received), knowing the time for military or diplomatic action or when to remain inactive, when to bestow gifts and honours, and so forth.

PTS: The Onward Roll of the Wheel a, Hare, trans., III.113
WP: 131. Continuing to Turn the Wheel (1), 744

#132. Dutiya Cakkaanuvattana Sutta.m, III.148

The Buddha compares the succession of rule of a monarch by his eldest son and the role of Sariputta as the foremost of teachers after Gotama to the rolling of wheels. The factors that make for the lasting rule of a monarch are similar to those that made for the lasting of the Dhamma.

PTS: The Onward Roll of the Wheel b, Hare, trans., III.114
WP: 132. Continuing to Turn the Wheel (2), 745

#133. Dhammaraaja Sutta.m, III.149

The Buddha compares the rule under Dhamma of a Wheel-turning king to the rule under Dhamma of the Tathagata.

PTS: The Onward Roll of the Wheel c, Hare, trans., III.114
WP: 133. The King, 746

#134. Khatatiya-Raaja Sutta.m, III.151

The Buddha compares the attributes of a king that give him confidence with the attributes of a bhikkhu that give him freedom of heart.

PTS: In Every Quarter, Hare, trans., III.116
WP: 134. In Whatever Quarter, 747

#135. Pa.thama Patthanaa Sutta.m, III.152

The Buddha likens five things that inspire a king's son to rule to five things that inspire a bhikkhu to attaining destruction of the corrupting influences.

PTS: The Aim a, Hare, trans., III.117
WP: 135. Yearning (1), 748

#136. Dutiya Patthanaa Sutta.m, III.154

The Buddha likens five things that inspire a king's son to viceroyalty to five things that inspire a bhikkhu to attaining destruction of the corrupting influences.

PTS: The Aim b, Hare, trans., III.118
WP: 136. Yearning (2), 750

#137. Appa.msupati Sutta.m, III.156

The Buddha lists five persons so greatly preoccupied that they sleep very little.

PTS: They Sleep Little, Hare, trans., III.118
BD: Wakeful, Olds, trans.
WP: 137. Little Sleep, 751

#138. Bhattaadaka Sutta.m, III.156

The Buddha likens the careless bhikkhu to a common elephant. 'Just taking up space.'

PTS: The Eater of Eatables, Hare, trans., III.119
WP: 138. A Consumer of Food, 751

#139. Akkhama Sutta.m, III.157

The Buddha contrasts the ability of a king's elephant to endure the sights, sounds, scents, tastes, and contacts of battle with the bhkkhu's ability to compose himself in the face of alluring sights, sounds, scents, tastes, and contacts.

PTS: He Cannot Endure, Hare, trans., III.120
ATI: Not Resilient, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 139. Cannot Patiently Endure, 751

#140. Sotaara Sutta.m, III.161

The Buddha contrasts the ability of a king's elephant to listen, destroy, guard himself, endure hardships and go where he has not gone before to the bhikkhu's ability to listen, destroy bad ideas, guard himself against alluring sense impressions, endure hardships, and go where he has not gone before.

PTS: The Hearers, Hare, trans., III.121
ATI: The Listener, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 140. One Who Listens, 755

XV. Tika.n.daki Vagga, III.164

PTS: Three-Thorn Grove, III.124
WP: Tika.n.dakii, 757

#141. Avajaanaati Sutta.m, III.164

The Buddha advises the bhikkhus on five sorts of people that exist in the world: the giver that dispises the one he gives to; one who on familiarity despises; the person who agrees with everything, the irresolute, and the scatterbrain.

PTS: He Gives and Despises, Hare, trans., III.124
WP: 141. Having Given, One Despises, 757

#142. Aarabhati Sutta.m, III.165

The Buddha describes five sorts of persons with various combinations of misdeeds and remorse and insight into freedom of heart and freedom of wisdom.

PTS: He Does Amiss, Hare, trans., III.125
WP: 142. One Violates, 758

#143. Saarandada Sutta.m, III.167

The Buddha encounters a number of Lacchavis who were discussing the five treasures of the Wheel-turning King. [see Be Not Afraid of Good Deeds or AN 7 59a] He turns them from this discussion of worldly things by describing the rarity of the appearance of an Awakened One, one who understands the Dhamma-Discipline, one able to teach the Dhamma-discipline, one who hearing the Dhamma-Discipline walks the walk, and the rarity of one who is grateful and gives thanks.

PTS: At Sarandada Shrine, Hare, trans., III.126
WP: 143. Saarandada, 760

#144. Tika.n.dakii Sutta.m, III.169

The Buddha praises the great benefit of periodic observation of the unpleasant in the pleasant, the pleasant in the unpleasant, both the pleasant and the unpleasant in the unpleasant, both the pleasant and the unpleasant in the unpleasant, and living detached from both the pleasant and unpleasant.

PTS: At Three-thorn Grove, Hare, trans., III.127
WP: 144. Tika.n.dakii Hell, 761

#145. Niraya Sutta.m, III.170

Five behaviors that lead to Hell, five that lead to heaven.

PTS: The Way to Hell, Hare, trans., III.129
WP: 145. Hell, 762

#146. Bhikkhu Mitta Sutta.m, III.171

The Buddha gives the bhikkhus some advice on the sorts of things to look for in a bhikkhu friend.
This is pretty much aimed at friendships between bhikkhus, but could be well taken into consideration by any layman who was strongly intent on the goal.

PTS: The Friend, Hare, trans., III.129
WP: 146. Friend, 763

#147. Asappurisadaana Sutta.m, III.171

Negative and positive guidelines for giving in the way a good man gives.

PTS: Not a Good Man's Gifts, Hare, trans., III.129
BD: Not a Goodman's Givings, Olds, trans.
WP: 147. A Bad Person, 763

#148. Sappurisa-Daana Sutta.m, III.172

Guidlines for giving in the way a good man gives and details of the results of such giving.
An expansion of the previous with the addition of details concerning the way each manner of giving is reflected in the results.

PTS: A Good Man's Gifts, Hare, trans., III.130
ATI: A Person of Integrity's Gifts, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
BD: The Good Man's Gifts, Olds, trans.
WP: 148. A Good Person, 763

#149. Pa.thama Samaya-Vimutta Sutta.m, III.173

Five things which lead to losing release that is attained and five things that lead to preserving release that is attained.
The term to understand in this sutta is 'samaya,' SAM = 'On' or 'With' AYA time, age, while. The 'Once upon a Time' or 'at one time' or 'once' of Nidana's. Once in a while. The contemporary Indian English: 'Once in a way.' VIMUTTI = Freedom. The thing itself is not a mystery: having let go of some attachment, after the unpleasant withdrawl symptoms have passed off, reflecting on the bondage one had to a past habit one experiences a sense of freedom. This is often a matter of a profound sense of freedom accompanied by a 'sigh of releaf.' If this is carefully examined, it is seen to be the whole process of attaining Arahantship in a nutshell. This has lead to problems. There are those who experiencing the more profound variety of these releases come to the conclusion they are Arahants. This leads to a second conclusion: that Arahants can fall back. This, according to Points of Controverys 2. Of Falling Away, (which I am not going to post here as it is a long argument concerning a special situation that is easily summarised as I am doing here) was a position taken at one point by the Sammitiyas, the Vajjiputtiyas, the Sabbatthivaadans, and some of the Mahaasanghikas. The most likely explanation of the controversy is that there were, at the time, multiple definitions of the term Arahant. It was a term sometimes used as an honorific for ordinary persons of distinction. It was commonly used of any wandering ascetic. We see this here and there in the suttas in the terms used by outsiders. However in Gotama's system as defined in the Suttas the Arahant is an individual who has attained Nibbaana in this life in such a way as eliminates any possibility of sliding back. This term then is to be applied to and is a valuable instruction for those who have not yet attained Arahantship.

PTS: Occasional Release, (a) Hare, trans., III. 131
BD: Upon-Time-Freedom (1), Olds, trans.
WP: 149. Temporarily Liberated (1), 764

#150. Dutiya.m Samaya-Vimutta Sutta.m, III.173

Five things which lead to losing release that is attained and five things that lead to preserving release that is attained.

PTS: Occasional Release, (b) Hare, trans., III.131
BD: Upon-Time-Freedom (2), Olds, trans.
WP: 150. Temporarily Liberated (2), 764

XVI. Saddhamma Vagga, III.174

PTS: Saddhamma, III.131
WP: The Good Dhamma, 764

#151. Pa.thama Sammattaniyaama Sutta.m, III.174

The Buddha describes five factors which assure good results from hearing Dhamma.

PTS: The Saddhamma Way a, Hare, trans., III.131
BD: The High Measure of Madness Method (1), Olds translation
WP: 151. The Fixed Course of Rightness (1), 764

#152. Dutiya Sammattaniyaama Sutta.m, III.175

The Buddha describes five factors which assure good results from hearing Dhamma.
A variation on the previous sutta.

PTS: The Saddhamma Way b, Hare, trans., III.132
BD: The High Measure of Madness Method (2), Olds translation
WP: 152. The Fixed Course of Rightness (2), 765

#153. Tatiya Sammattaniyaama Sutta.m, III.175

The Buddha describes five factors which assure good results from hearing Dhamma.
A variation on the previous sutta.

PTS: The Saddhamma Way c, Hare, trans., III.132
BD: The High Measure of Madness Method (3), Olds translation
WP: 153. The Fixed Course of Rightness (3), 765

#154. Pa.thama Saddhamma-Sammosa Sutta.m, III.176

Five things relating to the bhikkhus that contribute to the decline and disappearance of True Dhamma, and five things that lead to it's preservation.

PTS: The Confounding of Saddhamma a, Hare, trans., III.132
WP: 154. Decline of the Good Dhamma (1), 765

#155. Dutiya Saddhamma-Sammosa Sutta.m, III.177

Five things relating to the bhikkhus that contribute to the decline and disappearance of True Dhamma, and five things that lead to it's preservation.

PTS: The Confounding of Saddhamma b, Hare, trans., III.133
WP: 155. Decline of the Good Dhamma (2), 767

#156. Tatiya Saddhamma-Sammosa Sutta.m, III.178

Five things relating to the bhikkhus that contribute to the decline and disappearance of True Dhamma, and five things that lead to it's preservation.

PTS: The Confounding of Saddhamma c, Hare, trans., III.133
WP: 156. Decline of the Good Dhamma (3), 768

#157. Dukkathaa Sutta.m, III.181

The Buddha explains why in five cases certain types of discussions are inappropriate and produce only anger, and why in five other cases the same discussions are appropriate and produce good will.
Really good information which should be taken as advice concerning understanding one's audience and tayloring one's discussion to fit.

PTS: Ill Talk, Hare, trans., III.134
WP: 157. Wrongly Addressed Talk, 770

#158. Saarajja Sutta.m, III.183

Five conditions giving rise to fear and five giving rise to confidence.

PTS: The Fearful Heart, Hare, trans., III.135
WP: 158. Timidity, 772

#159. Udaayii Sutta.m, III.184

Five things to be kept in mind by anyone who wishes to teach Dhamma.
Very difficult, but very rewarding, things to keep in mind when given an opportunity to teach.

PTS: The Venerable Udayin, III.135
ATI: About Udayin, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 159. Udaayii, 773

#160. Duppa.tivinodaya Sutta.m, III.184

Five tendencies which are difficult to overcome.
If you have tried to put this system into practice you will have had to have dealt with tendencies within you that you had no idea were so strong because normally you just yielded to them at their first appearance. This sutta will be some help in that the most fundamental of these tendencies are here identified and acknowledged to be big problems: you are not alone facing your weaknesses!

PTS: Hard to Make a Push Against, Hare, trans., III.136
WP: 160. Hard to Dispel, 773

XVII. Aaghaata Vagga, III.185

PTS: Malice, Hare, trans., III.137
WP: Resentment, 773

#161. Pa.thama Aaghaatapa.tivinaya Sutta.m, III.185

Five things which should be employed to overcome anger that has arisen.

PTS: The putting away of malice a, Hare, trans., III.137
ATI: Subduing Hatred, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
ATI: Removing Annoyance, Nanamoli Thera, trans.
WP: 161. Removing Resentment (1), 773

#162. Dutiya.m Aaghaatapa.tivinaya Sutta.m, III.186

Sariputta elaborates with similes the methods for ridding themselves of hate which should be used by persons of various degrees of freedom from bad behavior and attainment of liberation.
An extremely helpful sutta. The similies are invaluable. Sariputta shines here as a teacher.
In this sutta I put forward a suggested solution to the problem of suttas which begin 'Then ...' or 'There then ..." which is, simply enough, that these suttas should be considered continuations of the events of the previous sutta. A whole evening's discussions might, for example, consist of numerous 'suttas' which are presented to us in the collections as though they should be taken separately.

PTS: The putting away of malice b, Hare, trans., III.137
ATI: Subduing Hatred 2, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 162. Removing Resentment (2), 774

#163. Ala.msaakaccha Sutta.m, III.190

Qualifications for giving dissertations on five topics of Dhamma: ethical conduct, serenity (samadhi), wisdom (panna), freedom and knowing and seeing freedom.
Identical with AN 5.65 above, but spoken by Sariputta.

PTS: Talk, Hare, trans., III.140
WP: 163. Discussions, 777

#164. Ala.msaajiiva Sutta.m, III.191

Five qualifications for setting a good example to one's fellows in the holy life.
Identical with AN 5.66 above, but spoken by Sariputta.

PTS: An Example, Hare, trans., III.141
WP: 164. Way of Life, 777

#165. Pa~nhapucchaa Sutta.m, III.191

Sariputta describes the five basic mental states to be found in a person who is asking a question.
On the one hand his is valuable information to keep in mind when considering a reply to someone asking a question of one. On the other hand it is valuable to keep in mind when considering asking a question of someone.

PTS: On Asking Questions, Hare, trans., III.141
ATI: On Asking Questions, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 165. Asking Questions, 777

#166. Nirodha Sutta.m, III.192

The Buddha elicits the recitation of the five qualities that make a bhikkhu beloved amongst his fellow seekers.
Well this is the point of the sutta, but before it gets to this point there is a long very obscure story relating a debate between Sariputta and Udayin. For a discussion of the possible meaning of this debate see Dhammatalk Forum: Dhammatalk: AN 5.166.

PTS: Ending, Hare, trans., III.141
WP: 166. Cessation, 777
Discussion

#167. Codanaa Sutta.m, III.196

Sariputta reviews factors that should be kept in mind by the bhikkhu who would correct another and by a bhikkhu that is corrected by another.
See also:
[VP 5.09.05] Vinaya Texts, III: The Kullavagga, Ninth Khandhaka, Chapter 5 Sacred Books of the East, Rhys Davids, Oldenberg translation, and
Vinaya Texts, III: The Kullavagga, Ninth Khandhaka, Chapter 5, Horner translation.
There is a wonderful conclusion to this sutta which is both humerous and instructive: a very long ... um ... description of those who would not understand this instruction, repeated by the Buddha. Along the lines of an old-time very-long-string-of-derogatory-comments curse. It also illustrates the conscious awareness on the part of these teachers of the need for constant repetition of important instructions.

PTS: Exhortation, Hare, trans., III.144
WP: 167. Reproving, 780

#168. Siila Sutta.m, III.200

Sariputta outlines the progressive interdependence of ethical behavior, serenity, knowing and seeing, disenchantment and dispassion, and knowing and seeing freedom.
Identical to AN 5.24, but spoken by Sariputta.

PTS: Virtue, Hare, trans., III.147
WP: 168. Virtuous Behavior, 784

#169. Khippanisanti Sutta.m, III.201

Five things one should become expert at in order to be quick-witted, handy, of wide knowledge and grasp of things and of retentive memory.

PTS: Coming to Know, Hare, trans., III.147
BD: Quick Witted, Olds, trans.
WP: 169. Of Quick Apprehension, 784

#170. Bhaddaji Sutta.m, III.202

Ananda elevates Bhikkhu Bhaddaji's understanding of what constitutes the best of sights, sounds, joys, conscious states and lives.

PTS: Bhaddaji, Hare, trans., III.148
WP: 170. Bhaddaji, 784

XVIII. Upaasaka Vagga, III.203

PTS: The Lay-Disciple, Hare, trans., III.150
WP: The Lay Followers, 786

#171. Saarajja Sutta.m, III.203

Five things which result in fearfulness for Buddhist lay followers and five things which result in a lay follower having confidence.

PTS: Fearfulness, Hare, trans., III.150
WP: 171. Timidity, 786

#172. Visaarada Sutta.m, III.203

Five things which result in living at home without confidence for Buddhist lay followers and five things which result in a lay follower living at home with confidence.

PTS: Confidence, Hare, trans., III.150
WP: 172. Self-Confidence, 786

#173. Niraya Sutta.m, III.204

Five things which result in a layman bein thrown into hell and five things which result in a layman being thrown into heaven.

PTS: Hell, Hare, trans., III.150
WP: 173. Hell, 786

#174. Vera Sutta.m, III.204

Five things which result in hatred here and hell hereafter and five things that free one from hatred here and hell hereafter.
This is an expansion on the previous. Elsewhere termed 'the five-fold guilty dread' [AN 10 92], 'the five-fold dread and hatred' [AN 9.27]. So far no one's translation makes good sense. The five actions are not the five guilty dreads, they are the sources of the guilty dreads. For the obvious case: The man who 'goes to another man's wife' is the source of the hatred directed at him by the husband, going to another man's wife is not itself hatred. ... though there will be those practitioners of modern psychology who will say that going to another man's wife is subconscious hatred of the other man. So who knows? Bhk. Bodhi translates: 'five perils and enmities' which comes closer. The idea is 'fearful hate-makers'.

PTS: Hatred, Hare, trans., III.150
WP: 174. Enmities, 787
Discussion

#175. Upaasaka-Ca.n.daala Sutta.m, III.206

Five things which result in a lay follower to be dispised by other lay followers, and five things which result in his being cherished by other lay followers.
It should be noted that this sutta is directed to lay followers, not, as Hare, to laymen in general. Without keeping that in mind the last item, which deals with whether or not a person seeks 'outside' for recipients of gifts is unclear. Then, making it clear with '(the Order)' bracked to indicate 'implied', the statement, as applied to any layman, becomes untrue.

PTS: The Outcast, Hare, trans., III.151
ATI: The Outcast, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 175. Ca.n.daala, 788

#176. Piiti Sutta.m, III.206

The Buddha and Sariputta team up to teach Anathapindika and his retinue of 500 lay disciples the advantages of seclusion.
This sutta is interesting in that it points to the key factor that identifies the first jhaana: the appreciation (piiti) or enjoyment or zest for solitude. Bhikkhu Thanissaro has translated (piiti) as 'rapture'. This is not technically an incorrect translation in that the term covers a spectrum of meanings from 'mild interest' through 'excitement, entheusiasm, zest, love, passionate interest and 'rapture.' However as this is an instruction being given to laymen, and apparently being given to them for the first time, to suggest that such should 'from time to time' just, snap-fingers, enter rapture over being in solitude is not realistic and is unlikely to have been the intent. The practice of this system is going to be the most difficult thing anyone has ever attempted, there is no good served by making it appear more difficult than it is.

PTS: Zest, Hare, trans., III.152
ATI: Rapture, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 176. Rapture, 789

#177. Va.nijjaa Sutta.m, III.208

Five trades, modes of livlihood, manners of making a living that should not be undertaken by a Buddhist Lay Follower. Notice here the use of broad general or generic terms for the various occupations thus rendering the list less subject to time. 'Swords' is to imply weapons. It could have been 'knives', but knives are sometimes not used as weapons. Trade in living beings implies more than the slave trade and includes trade in animals raised for slaughter. Trade in 'limbs' or 'members' (parts) points to the role of the butcher. The instruction is not to engage in the selling of meat; there is no prohibition against the eating of meat. This is the tactic used in all such issues. This is the tactic used in the case of the trade in maddening drugs. At the time alcohol was the only problem drug but the term points to the real issue: any substance which causes a person to loose good judgment.

PTS: Trades, Hare, trans., III.153
ATI: Business (Wrong Livelihood), Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
BD: Trades, Olds, trans.
WP: 177. Trades, 790

#178. Raaja Sutta.m, III.208

The Buddha teaches the value of ethical conduct by asking the bhikkhus if they had ever heard of or seen the punishment of persons who had given up unethical conduct being punished because of their having given up unethical conduct. Then he asks if they had ever heard of or seen the punishment of persons who had engaged in unethical conduct being puhished because of their having engaged in unethical conduct.
This sutta is valuable because it throws some light on what is meant by the five basic rules of ethical conduct. For example, the harm of lying is shown to be a matter of the lie having caused material damage. There is considerable controversy concerning the meaning of the prohibition of 'drinks fermented and distilled'. This is clearly alcohols, but others today, concerned with 'the drug problem' argue that the drug which they are particularly against should be included. Here we see that the important factor to consider is not the substance but the behavior of one using the substance. If, under the influence of such and such a thing, one kills, steals, lies, or engages in misconduct in the pursuit of pleasure, then that thing should be given up. Probably we should include 'in the pursuit of obtaining, where it is illegal' - for some drugs, like heroin, inspire such fear of withdrawl that where the drug is not freely available the addict will engage in unethical behavior that is not evident when the drug is easily available - witness the 6% of Medical Doctors addicted to morphine whose behavior, because their drug of choice is easily available to them, is exemplary. From the Buddhist perspective this choice of behaviors, these 'rules' are a personal matter, 'good advice', not a matter of judging others or making laws.
Note that this advice is being directed to laymen. It is here a matter of living while evading the gross danger of worldly punishment. It does not yet reach up to the advantages of ethical conduct in avoiding rebirth in disagreeable states, avoiding unpleasant company, securing solitude, entering the jhaanas, or attaining liberation. Anyone, whatever their beliefs, ought to be able to see the sense of these rules.

PTS: Rajahs, Hare, trans., III.153
WP: 178. Kings, 790

#179, Gihii Sutta.m, III.211

The Buddha describes the qualifications which if found in one by one's self, one, one's self may say of one's self that one has attained Streamwinning, is no longer subject to birth in any sub-human state and is destined to attain Nibbana.

PTS: The Home-Man, Hare, trans., III.155
ATI: The Householder, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 179. A Layman, 792

#180. Gavesii Sutta.m, III.214

The Buddha tells a tail of the old times of Gavisen, the lay disciple of Kassapa Buddha whose constant struggle to surpass his 500 followers and their constant struggle to keep even with him lead to their all becoming arahants.

PTS: Gavesin, the Seeker, Hare, trans., III.
ATI: About Gavesin, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 180. Gavesii, 795

XIX. Ara~n~na Vagga, III.219

PTS: The Forest, Hare, trans., III.161
WP: Forest Dwellers, 798

#181. Aara~n~naka Sutta.m, III.219

The Buddha enumerates five motives people have for living the forest life.

PTS: Forest-Gone, Hare, trans., III. 161
WP: 181. Forest Dwellers, 798

#182. Pa.msukuulika Sutta.m, III.219

The Buddha enumerates five motives people have for wearing dust-heap rags.

PTS: Rag-Clad, Hare, trans., III. 161
WP: 182-190. Wearers of Rag-Robes, Etc., 799

#182. Pi.n.dapaatika Sutta.m, III.219
This sutta is found only in the Buddha Jayanti Tripitaka. To retain the PTS numbering of the Pali this is given the number '183a.'

The Buddha enumerates five motives people have for pracicing the begging-round only practice.
That is not accepting food from a community kitchen, gathered for a group meal, accepting invitations, and so forth.

Alms-Round Only Men, Not included in the PTS collection. In the manner of the Hare translations of the other suttas in this chapter.

#182. Rukkhamuulika Sutta.m, III.219

The Buddha enumerates five motives people have for taking up the practice of making their dwelling at the foot of a tree.
They dwell in-doors during the three months of the rainy season.

PTS: Tree-Root Sitters, Hare, trans., III. 161

#182. Sosaanika Sutta.m, III.219

The Buddha enumerates five motives people have for taking up the practice of living in a charnal ground.

PTS: Graveyard Haunters, Hare, trans., III. 161

#182. Abbhokaasika Sutta.m, III.219

The Buddha enumerates five motives people have for taking up the practice of living under the open sky.

PTS: Open-Air Lodgers, Hare, trans., III. 161

#182. Nesajjika Sutta.m, III.219

The Buddha enumerates five motives people have for taking up the practice of sleeping in the sitting posture.
Hare has mistranslated this. It is not that this person only sits in one place, but that he only sleeps in the sitting posture. Since he has abridged the entire sutta down to his title, I have unabridged it using 'sitting man' for what would have been his 'one-place sitting man'.

PTS: One Place Sitters, Hare, trans., III. 161

#182. Yathaasanthatika Sutta.m, III.219

The Buddha enumerates five motives people have for taking up the practice of sleeping on whatever surface comes to hand.

PTS: Any-Bed Men, Hare, trans., III. 161

#182. Ekaasanika Sutta.m, III.219

The Buddha enumerates five motives people have for taking up the practice of one-sitting men, or lone-sitting men.
Hare has 'lone sitter'; Bhk. Bodhi has 'one-session-practice' and defines it as being one who eats his food in one sitting, when he gets up the meal is finished; P.E.D. has 'one who keeps to himself'. The Pe Maung Tin translation of the Visuddhimagga would favor Bhk. Bodhi's understanding. Both of these are recommended practices that are the hallmarks of extra effort.

PTS: Lone Sitters, Hare, trans., III. 161

#182. Khalupacchaabhattika Sutta.m, III.219

The Buddha enumerates five motives people have for taking up the practice of refusing food after one serving.
Bhk. Bodhi has 'later-food-refuser's practice' and defines it as being one who refuses any food that may be offered and made available after one has started one's meal. The Pe Maung Tin translation of the Visuddhimagga has this as the 'after-food refuser' and defines that as one who refuses any food after his first meal which leaves open the possibility of additional food being placed in the bowl during that first meal.

PTS: Never-After-Time-Eaters, Hare, trans., III. 161

#182. Pattapi.n.dika Sutta.m, III.219

The Buddha enumerates five motives people have for taking up the practice of eating only from the begging bowl.
This is as opposed to the practice at some tables of communal dishes, extra dishes for liquids, etc.
The thing to be kept in mind about all these practices is that the practice itself does nothing. They can, as these suttas illustrate, lead in precisely the wrong direction. The idea is that by the adoption of these practices as training tools one accustoms one's self to wanting little and one has the opportunity to experience the value of that. Upon experiencing that value the habit will thereafter be retained just simply because of that value.

PTS: From-One-Bowl Eaters, Hare, trans., III. 161

XX. Braahma.na Vagga, aka So.na Vagga, III.221

PTS: The Brahman, Hare, trans., III.162
WP: Dogs, 800

#191. So.na Sutta.m, III.221

The Buddha describes five noble behaviors that in the old days characterized both Brahmans and dogs but at a later time were to be found only in dogs.
Besides being a forceful way to encourage brahmans to reform their behavior, this sutta teaches one aspect of the art of 'seeing' and is also an example of what it means to be mindful of the appearance and disappearance of things.

PTS: The Dog Simile, Hare, trans., III.162
WP: 191. Dogs, 800

#192. Do.na Sutta.m, III.223

Brahman Dona comes to Gotama intending to criticize him for not rising up for Brahmins and is given an education as to various sorts of Brahmins.
In various places in the Suttas, brahmins approach Gotama telling him that they have heard that he does not rise up for elder brahmins. They, being old brahmins, see that he does not rise up for them, criticize him for his lack of courtesy and are usually given a lecture on what constitutes an 'elder' or the person who should be shown such veneration. That is, their criticism is answered directly. Here Dona, who is apparently not an old brahman, but simply brahmin born and educated, observes that Gotama does not rise up for him and concludes that what he has heard is correct and launches into his criticism. But here Gotama's response is very subtle. He speaks to Dona of the doctrines laid out by Dona's own authorities concering what constitutes brahmin worthy of veneration. Dona recognizes that he does not fit the description of the worthy sorts of Brahmins and he is so impressed with Gotama's subtlty and knowledge that he is converted. Another wonderful example of Gotama's skill as a teacher.

PTS: Braahman Do.na, Hare, trans., III.163
WP: 192. Do.na, 801
Discussion

#193. Sa'ngaarava Sutta.m, III.230

Brahman Sangarava asks Gotama why it is that sometimes suttas are easily recollected and sometimes not. The Buddha explains that when the mind is clouded over with lust, anger, sloth, fear and doubt, things cannot easily be remembered, but when the mind is clear of lust, anger, sloth, fear and doubt things are easily remembered.
An important sutta because it gives similes for the Nivaranas (the diversions, hindrances) which should clear up any doubts as to their translations. There is also there a footnote which gives the methods for overcoming the diversions per the commentary.

PTS: Brahman Sangarava, Hare, trans., III.168
WP: 193. Sa'ngaarava, 806

#194. Kaara.napaali Sutta.m, III.236

Brahman Pingiyanin praises Gotama in such glowing terms that he converts Brahman Karanapalin.
The value to us of this sutta is that it eloquantly illustrates what it means to recognize what is well said when one hears it.

PTS: Braahman Kaara.napaalin, Hare, trans., III.171
WP: 194. Kaara.napaalii, 810

#195. Pi'ngiyaanii Sutta.m, III.239

Brahman Pingiyanin sings the praises of Gotama in verses upon seeing how he outshone the brilliance of an array of Licchavis dressed in all their finery.
Identical with AN 5.143 but with a different introductory story.

PTS: Brahman Pingiyanin, Hare, trans., III.174
WP: 195. Pi'ngiyaanii, 812

#196. Mahaasupina Sutta.m, III.240

Before his awakening, Gotama has five dreams revealing the future: that he would become the Awakened One, that he would see and know and establish the Eight-Dimensional High Way, that he would bring many lay persons to refuge in the Dhamma, that he will bring people of all colors and status from the four courners of the world to complete awakening, and that he would receive the essentials without attachment.

PTS: Dreams, Hare, trans., III.175
ATI: Dreams, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 196. Dreams, 813

#197. Vassantaraaya Sutta.m, III.243

Five reasons for draught not seen with the eye.
Hare has translated 'cakkhu,' the eye, here as 'seers' and has by that completely reversed the meaning of this sutta for surely it is by being a 'seer' that Gotama has seen what he is revealing in this sutta. This is another sutta with ideas similar to those found in AN 4.70 which will be dismissed without thought by most people.

PTS: The Rains, Hare, trans., III.177
WP: 197. Rain, 815
Discussion

#198. Subhaasitavaacaa Sutta.m, III.243

Five things that characterize what is well said.
This is so important in recognizing true Dhamma from false, distinguishing a speaker who understands what he is saying from one who does not understand, and in dealing intelligently with people during an ordinary conversation. Our biases tend to override our ears. Life is much more interesting and informative when we are able to listen and recognize what is well said as well said and what is not well said as not well said.

PTS: The Word, Hare, trans., III.178
ATI: A Statement, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
BD: The Well-Said, Olds, trans.
WP: 198. Speech, 816
Discussion

#199. Kula Sutta.m, III.244

The Buddha informs the bhikkhus about five ways in which when virtuous bhikkhus visit householders those householders have an opportunity to make great good kamma.

PTS: The Family, Hare, trans., III.178

ATI: A Family
WP: 199. Families, 816

#200. Nissaara.niiya Sutta.m, III.245

The Buddha teaches a method for escape from a heart of lust, anger, cruelty, and obsession with shape and individuality.
This is a sutta that deals with a method we come across here and there but not very often: the idea of escaping one set of ideas by intentionally focusing on another set. Bhk Thanissaro has done a translation which is more readable than Hare's but which does not forcefully make the point that it is switching from one set of ideas to another set of ideas that is the way to 'set right' the heart. Bhk. Bodhi has also missed this point apparently misunderstanding the Commentary. One departs thoughts of lust by placing the mind on thoughts of giving up. It is not that one has thoughts of lust that do not satisfy and one has thoughts of giving up that do satisfy and when his mind departs from lust it is freed; it is noticing that when one has thoughts of lust they do not satisfy and when one has thoughts of giving up they satisfy and when thoughts of lust arise one escapes them by departing from the thoughts of lust by focusing on the thoughts of giving up.

PTS: The Escape, Hare, trans., III.179
ATI: Leading to Escape, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 200. Escape, 816

XXI. Kimbila Vagga, III.247

PTS: Kimbila, Hare, trans., III.180
WP: Kimbila, 818

#201. Kimbila Sutta.m, III.247

Gotama gives five reasons the True Dhamma will not last long and five reasons it will last long.

PTS: Kimbila, Hare, trans., III.180
WP: 201. Kimbila, 818

#202. Dhammasava.na Sutta.m, III.248

Five advantages from hearing Dhamma.

PTS: On Hearing Dhamma, Hare, trans., III.181
ATI: Listening to the Dhamma, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 202. Listening to theDhamma, 819

#203. Aajaaniiya Sutta.m, III.248

Five characteristics that make a horse worthy of a king that are the same characteristics that make a bhikkhu worthy of offerings.

PTS: The Thoroughbred, Hare, trans., III.181
WP: 203. Thoroughbred, 819

#204. Bala Sutta.m, III.248

Lists the five Powers, (balani).
Similar to AN 5.1, except there they are called 'learner's powers'.

PTS: The Powers, Hare, trans., III.182
WP: 204. Powers, 819

#205. Cetokhila Sutta.m, III.248

Five states of the heart termed 'fallow' (untilled, unplowed, unused, gone to waste, barren) which result in sluggish or no progress.

PTS: Mental Barrenness, Hare, trans., III.182
WP: 205. Barrenness, 819

#206. Vinibandha Sutta.m, III.249

Five things that twist up the heart. Vinibandha Re-down-bond.

PTS: Mental bondage, Hare, trans., III.182
WP: 206. Bondages, 820

#207. Yaagu Sutta.m, III.250

Five advantages of rice porrage (gruel).
What is this doing here? This is a system which teaches the best of every aspect of living. Remember the first lesson in life is understanding 'ahara' food, including solid food. Understanding food is one of the paths to liberation. Pa.thavi Apo Tejo Vayo, The Path of Eve's Apple Will Teach You the Way Out. Contentment with little could in the Buddha's time, come down to being happy just to receive a little rice gruel in the bowl. Being able to live happily on a bowl of porrage could save your life during hard times.

PTS: Gruel, Hare, trans., III.183
WP: 207. Rice Porridge, 821

#208, Dantaka.t.tha Sutta.m, III.250

Five advantages from using a tooth stick.
This subject came up concerning bad breath among the bhikkhus. Rhys Davids picks a nit, but an interesting one noting that this should not be translated 'toothbrush' and explaining the use of the toothstick. I wonder how healthy the toothbrush really is. It sits around damp and even if it is carefully cleaned itself after brushing it still tends to retain food particles. And then there is the question of wear and tear on the teeth from daily brushings for decade upon decade.

PTS: The Tooth-Stick, Hare, trans., III.183
BD: Brush Your Teeth! Olds, trans.
WP: 208. Brushing, 822

#209. Giitassara Sutta.m, III.251

The disadvantages of sing-song Dhamma recitation.

PTS: The plain-song, Hare, trans., III.184
WP: 209. Intonation, 822
Forum Discussion

#210, Mu.t.thassati Sutta.m, III.251

The disadvantages of going to sleep forgetful of mindfulness versus the advantages of going to sleep with mindfulness well set up.
Don Juan deals with sleep and dreaming from within, making the effort of his practice becoming conscious from within the dream; the Buddhist practice is to bring sleep down to the absolute minimum and to completely ignore dreaming with the result that waking life assumes at will the plasticity of dreams and in sleep one remains fully conscious. In the middle is the exercise of command over the sleeping mind through pre-sleep programming. "Let me retain full consciousness while sleeping and dreaming." "Let there be no erotic content, anxiety-provoking content, or evil thoughts in my dreams." "Let me waken at the first appearance of erotic content ... ." etc.

PTS: Forgetful in Mindfulness, Hare, trans., III.
BD: Mindless Napping, Olds, trans.
WP: 210. With Middled Mind, 822

XXII. Akkosaka Vagga, III.252

PTS: The Abuser, Hare, trans., III.184
WP: One Who Insults, 823

#211. Akkosaka Sutta.m, III.252

Five bad outcomes to be expected from abusing those who have undertaken the holy life.
This is directed at bhikkhus. It definately not a good thing for anyone to abuse the bhikkhus, but it is particularly dangerous for bhikkhus to do so because they are held to a higher standard.

PTS: Abuse, Hare, trans., III.184
WP: 211. One Who Insults, 823

#212. Bha.n.danakaaraka Sutta.m, III.252

Five outcomes to be expected for a bhikkhu who causes srife within the Sangha.

PTS: Strife, Hare, trans., III.185
WP: 212. Arguments, 823

#213. Siila Sutta.m, III.252

Five disadvantages of unethical conduct and five advantages of ethical conduct.

PTS: Morals, Hare, trans., III.185
WP: 213. Virtuous Behavior, 823

#214. Bahubhaa.ni Sutta.m, III.254

Five disadvantages of a big talker, five advantages of being a man of few words.

PTS: A Man Full of Talk, Hare, trans., III.186
WP: 214. Speaking Much, 824

#215. Pa.thama Akkhanti Sutta.m, III.254

Five disadvantages of being impatient, five advantages of being patient.

PTS: Impatience a, Hare, trans., III.186
WP: 215. Impatience (1), 825

#216. Dutiya Akkhanti Sutta.m, III.255

Five disadvantages of being impatient, five advantages of being patient.

PTS: Impatience b, Hare, trans., III.187
WP: 216. Impatience (2), 825

#217. Pa.thama Apaasaadika Sutta.m, III. 255

Five disadvantages of the troubled mind; five advantages of the untroubled mind.
An encouragement to straighten up your act to put your mind at ease.

PTS: The Troubled Mind (a), Hare, trans., III.187
WP: 217. Not Inspiring Confidence (1), 825

#218. Dutiya Apaasaadika Sutta.m, III.255

Five disadvantages of the troubled mind; five advantages of the untroubled mind.
It's like a crying baby, you do not first ask what the reasons are that it is crying, you first do what will calm it down, then you pretty much know what is the reason for it's crying and can take action. First still, calm, tranquillize the heart creating impassivity, that will clear the view and you will know what is needed to be done.

PTS: The Troubled Mind (b), Hare, trans., III.187
WP: 218. Not Inspiring Confidence (2), 825

#219. Aggi Sutta.m, III.256

Five disadvantages of fire.
Hare translates tiracchaanakathaa as 'tales of animals are told', but this is usually translated 'animal talk' meaning talk about just about anything other than Dhamma:
Talk of kings and ministers of state,
robbers and thieves,
the horrors of war and battle;
talk of food, drink, clothes, beds, garlands and perfumes;
talk of cities, towns, villages,
relationships, men and women,
heroes and villains;
gossip at the corner,
over the back fence,
or at the well
talk of those alive or of those who are departed;
talk comparing differences between this and that;
speculative talk about creation,
existence or non-existence.

PTS: Fire, Hare, trans., III.187
WP: 219. Fire, 826

#220, Madhuraa Sutta.m, III.256

Five disadvantages of the Madhura territory.

PTS: In Madhuraa, Hare, trans., III.188
WP: 220. Madhuraa, 826

XXIII. Diigha-Caarika Vagga, III.257

PTS: Wandering Afield, Hare, trans. III.188
WP: Lengthy Wandering, 826

#221. Pa.thama Diigha-Caarika Sutta.m, III.257

Five disadvantages from lengthy random meanderings, five advantages from purposeful travel.

PTS: Wandering Afield a, Hare, trans., III.188
WP: 221. Lengthy Wandering (1), 826

#222. Dutiya Diigha-Caarika Sutta.m, III.257

Five disadvantages from lengthy random meanderings, five advantages from purposeful travel.

PTS: Wandering Afield b, Hare, trans., III.189
WP: 222. Lengthy Wandering (2), 827

#223. Pa.thama Atinivaasa Sutta.m, III.258

The problems associated with living in the same place for a long time versus the advantages of spending equal amounts of time in various places.
Really good advice if you have any ambition to achieve non-returning or arahantship.

PTS: Staying Too Long a, Hare, trans., III.189
WP: 223. Residing Too Long, 827

#224. Dutiya Atinivaasa Sutta.m, III.258

The problems associated with living in the same place for a long time versus the advantages of spending equal amounts of time in various places.

PTS: Staying Too Long b, Hare, trans., III.189
WP: 224. Miserly, 828

#225. Pa.thama Kuluupaga Sutta.m, III.258

Five disadvantages for a bhikkhu that visits with families.
Hare has rendered his translation understanding that the bhikkhu is offending the family by various things; Bhk. Bodhi seems to have the more reasonable translation indicating that these are offences against the rules for bhikkhus.
The offense of teaching Dhamma to women in more than five or six 'vaacaahi' [voicings] is interesting. First of all, Bhk. Bodhi translates 'vaacaahi' as sentences whereas Hare has 'words'. Elsewhere I recall this being translated 'verses'. Neither translator explains or cites the Vinaya. The idea is, I believe, found in the phenomena we can observe at talks where the enrapturing power of eloquent speech acts as an aphrodisiac with certain women and where, consequently, the bhikkhu without great self-control might find himself in danger, or, as Hare might understand it, greatly upset a husband or father. The Buddha himself was exempt from the rule and the bhikkhus regularly taught the bhikkhunis, so perhaps this rule applies only to bhikkhus speaking to lay women. I wonder how this rule applies today when a bhikkhu speaks to a group that may include persons of both sexes.

PTS: The Visitor of Families a, Hare, trans., III.189
WP: 225. One Who Visits Families (1), 828

#226. Dutiyo Kuluupaga Sutta.m, III.259

Five disadvantages for a bhikkhu that visits with families.

PTS: The Visitor of Families b, Hare, trans., III.190
WP: 226. One Who Visits Families (2), 828

#227. Bhoga Sutta.m, III.259

Five worries steming from wealth and five things that make for gladness steming from wealth.

PTS: Riches, Hare, trans., III.190
WP: 227. Wealth, 829

#228. Ussuurabhatta Sutta.m, III.260

The advantages of serving the main meal before the noon hour has passed versus the disadvantages of serving it at a later time.
Ussuurabhatte. After the sun is fully risen, that is, noon to one o'clock. No food after the time when the shadow cast by an upright stick in India is two-finger-widths past where it makes no shadow (noon). (Some say time's up when the sun casts no shadow. It certainly would be more convenient for lay followers whishing to practice the one-meal-a-day practice that the time limit was set at 1:00 PM in that most restaurants are only open from 11:30.) In the U.S. that is called 'The Noon Hour' or 'Lunch Time.' At one time here, when farming still dominated the culture, it was the main meal of the day and was called 'dinner'. The evening meal was called 'supper' and ususually consisted of soup and bread or perhaps some cold meat or cheese and the rule for good health was 'breakfast like a king, dine like a farmer, sup like a pauper'. In my grandmother's day and in the first part of my mother's day (@1850 - 1940), in the U.S. in the upper classes or in those who immitated the English upper classes with adaptation for the working husband, the first meal was often very heavy, with porrage with butter and milk and sugar, bacon and eggs and chops and toast, and coffee; there was Elevenzes, a tea-break at 11:00 with cheese, small sandwitches, pastries and tea; Lunch which was soup and a sandwitch and fruit; Afternoon tea at 4:00PM, tea and crackers and cheese; and Dinner, a heavy meal of one or several courses of meat, potatoes, deserts, cheese, fruit, wines or beer, coffee and cigars; a cup of chocolate before bedtime; and a 'Midnight Snack' munching on whatever looked good in the 'ice-box' ... and wonder at indigestion, constipation, nightmares and bed-wetting not to mention the health problems resulting from obesity. Celebratory feasts (Thanksgiving, Christmas) were usually multi-course affairs held around 3:00 in the afternoon and were called 'Dinner'. Today [Friday, September 12, 2014 12:23 PM] breakfast, except on weekends, is a bagle or pastry and coffee, lunch and dinner are sometimes light and sometimes heavy.

PTS: The Meal, Hare, trans., III.191
WP: 228. A Meal, 829

#229. Pa.thama Ka.nhasappa Sutta.m, III.260

The Buddha likens the evil qualities of the black snake to the evil qualities of women.

PTS: The snake a, Hare, trans., III.191
BD: The Black Snake (1), Olds, trans.
WP: 229. Snake (1), 830

#230. Dutiya Ka.nhasappa Sutta.m, III.260

The Buddha likens the evil qualities of the black snake to the evil qualities of women.

PTS: The snake b, Hare, trans., III.
BD: The Black Snake (2), Olds, trans.
WP: 230. Snake (2), 830

XXIV. Aavaasika Vagga, III.261

PTS: In Residence, Hare, trans., III.192
WP: Resident, 830

#231. Abhaavaniiya Sutta.m, III.261

Five things which are not ways a bhikkhu in residence should live, and five ways in which he should live.
Hare translates 'a-bhaavaniiyo hoti' as 'what he ought to become' leading to the construction: 'By following x he becomes what he ought not to become. What X? He becomes accomplished in neither this nor that.' What did he follow? One knows what it means but it is very awkwardly translated.
Bhk. Bodhi makes more sense with 'possessing x he is not to be esteemed' which makes very free with the Pali but which we might justify understanding it to mean 'possessing this X he ought not to be considered becoming'. We really need to dip into slang: 'He be not 'oughta-become-a' or 'ish'.

PTS: In Residence, Hare, trans., III.192
WP: 231. Not to Be Esteemed, 830

#232. Piya Sutta.m, III.262

Five things which a bhikkhu in residence should cultivate to be pleasing and gain respect and the reputation of being pious.

PTS: The Pious, Hare, trans., III.192
WP: 232. Pleasing, 831

#233. Sobhana Sutta.m, III.262

Five things possessed of which a bhikkhu graces his residence.

PTS: Grace, Hare, trans., III.
WP: 233. Beautifying, 831

#234. Bahuupakaara Sutta.m, III.263

Five things a bhikkhu should do if he wishes to be known as of great service to his residence.

PTS: Of Great Service, Hare, trans., III.193
WP: 234. Very Helpful, 832

#235. Anukampaka Sutta.m, III.263

Five things a bhikkhu does that reflect his kindly feelings towards householders.

PTS: Taking Pity, Hare, trans., III.193
WP: 235. Compassionate, 832

#236. Pa.thama Ava.n.naaraha Sutta.m, III.264

Following five things the bhikkhu is cast into Hell; following the five opposite things he is cast into Heavon.

PTS: The Reward of Dispraise, Hare, trans., III.194
WP: 236. One Who Deserves Dispraise (1), 832

#237. Dutiya Ava.n.naaraha Sutta.m, III.265

Following five things the bhikkhu is cast into Hell; following the five opposite things he is cast into Heavon.

PTS: Stinginess a, Hare, trans., III.194
WP: 237. One Who Deserves Dispraise (2), 833

#238. Tatiya Ava.n.naaraha Sutta.m, III.265

Following five things the bhikkhu is cast into Hell; following the five opposite things he is cast into Heavon.

PTS: Stinginess b, Hare, trans., III.194
WP: 238. One Who Deserves Dispraise (3), 833

#239. Pa.thama Cchariya Sutta.m, III.266

Following five things the bhikkhu is cast into Hell; following the five opposite things he is cast into Heavon.

PTS: Stinginess c, Hare, trans., III.194
WP: 239. Miserliness (1), 834

#240. Dutiya Cchariya Sutta.m, III.266

Following five things the bhikkhu is cast into Hell; following the five opposite things he is cast into Heavon.

PTS: Stinginess d, Hare, trans., III.194
WP: 240. Miserliness (2), 834

XXV. Duccarita Vagga, III.267

PTS: Walking in Evil, Hare, trans., III.195
WP: Misconduct, 835

#241. Duccarita Sutta.m, III.267

Five disadvantages to be looked for by one who has carried on badly; five advantages to be looked for by one who has carried on well.

PTS: One Who Has Walked in Evil, Hare, trans., III.195
WP: 241. Misconduct, 835

#242. Kaaya-Duccarita Sutta.m, III.267

Five disadvantages to be looked for by one who has carried on badly in body; five advantages to be looked for by one who has carried on well in body.

PTS: One Who Has Walked in Evil (deed), Hare, trans., III.195
WP: 242. Bodily Misconduct, 835

#243. Vacii-Duccarita Sutta.m, III.267

Five disadvantages to be looked for by one who has carried on badly in speech; five advantages to be looked for by one who has carried on well in speech.

PTS: One Who Has Walked in Evil, (word) Hare, trans., III.195
WP: 243. Verbal Misconduct, 835

#244. Mano-Duccarita Sutta.m, III.267

Five disadvantages to be looked for by one who has carried on badly in mind; five advantages to be looked for by one who has carried on well in mind.

PTS: One Who Has Walked in Evil (thought), Hare, trans., III.195
WP: 244. Mental Misconduct, 836

#245. Apara-Duccarita Sutta.m, III.268

Five disadvantages to be looked for by one who has carried on badly; five advantages to be looked for by one who has carried on well.
A variation on AN 5.241.

PTS One Who Has Walked in Evil 2,Hare, trans., III.195
WP: 245. Another on Misconduct, 836

#246. Apara-Kaaya-Duccarita Sutta.m, III.268

Five disadvantages to be looked for by one who has carried on badly in body; five advantages to be looked for by one who has carried on well in body.
A variation on AN 5.242.

PTS One Who Has Walked in Evil (deed 2),Hare, trans., III.195
WP: 246. Another on Bodily Misconduct, 836

#247. Apara-Vacii-Duccarita Sutta.m, III.268

Five disadvantages to be looked for by one who has carried on badly in speech; five advantages to be looked for by one who has carried on well in speech.
A variation on AN 5.243.

PTS One Who Has Walked in Evil (word 2),Hare, trans., III.195
WP: 247. Another on Verbal Misconduct, 836

#248. Apara-Mano-Duccarita Sutta.m, III.268

Five disadvantages to be looked for by one who has carried on badly in mind; five advantages to be looked for by one who has carried on well in mind.
A variation on AN 5.244.

PTS One Who Has Walked in Evil (thought 2),Hare, trans., III.195
WP: 248. Another on Mental Misconduct, 836

#249. Siivathikaa Sutta.m, III.268

The Buddha compares the filth, stench, fearfulness, haunted and sorrow-making aspects of the cemetery to qualities found in a person of evil ways of body, speech and mind.

PTS: The Cemetery, Hare, trans., III.195
WP: 249. A Charnal Ground, 837

#250. Puggala-Ppasaada Sutta.m, III.270

The disadvantages of placing one's faith in an individual.

PTS: Devotion to One Person, Hare, trans., III.196
WP: 250. Confidence in a Person, 837

XXVI. Upasampadaa Vagga, III.271

PTS: Acceptance, Hare, trans., III.197
WP: Full Ordination, 838

#251. Upasampaadetabba Sutta.m, III.271

The Buddha describes the situation where full acceptance should be granted whether or not the bhikkhu has undergone a period of training.
This tells us much about the state of the several persons accepted into the order directly from the state of being a layman or of being a wanderer, or of one belonging to another sect.

PTS: Acceptance, Hare, trans., III.197
WP: 251. Who May Give Full Ordination, 838

#252. Nissaya Sutta.m, III.271

The Buddha describes the qualifications that should be found in one who assigns apprentices.
Hare's 'Protection' is Nissaya. Bhk. Bodhi translates 'dependence' and defines: A procedure prescribed in the Vinaya by which a junior bhikkhu apprentices himself to a qualified senior bhikkhu, normally his preceptor or teacher.

PTS: Protection, Hare, trans., III.197
WP: 252. Dependence, 839

#253. Saama.nera Sutta.m, III.271

The Buddha describes the qualifications that should be possessed by a bhikkhu who may have a novice attendant.

PTS: Service, Hare, trans., III.197
WP: 253. Novice, 839

#254. Macchariya Sutta.m, III.272

The Buddha enumerates five forms of miserliness.

PTS: Stinginess, Hare, trans., III.197
ATI: Stinginess 1, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 254. Miserliness, 839

#255. Macchariya-Pahaana Sutta.m, III.272

The Buddha enumerates five forms of miserliness which must be given up to live the holy life.

PTS: The Godly Life, Hare, trans., III.198
ATI: Stinginess 2, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 255. Abandonng Miserliness, 839

#256. Pa.thamajjhaana Sutta.m, III.272

The Buddha enumerates five forms of miserliness which must be given up to enter the first jhana.

PTS: Musing (first), Hare, trans., III.198
ATI: Stinginess 3, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 256. First Jhaana, 840

#256. Dutiyajjhaana Sutta.m, III.272

The Buddha enumerates five forms of miserliness which must be given up to enter the second jhana.

PTS: Musing (second), Hare, trans., III.198
ATI: Stinginess 4, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 265-271. Another on the Second Jhaana, Etc., 841

#256. Tatiyajjhaana Sutta.m, III.272

The Buddha enumerates five forms of miserliness which must be given up to enter the third jhana.

PTS: Musing (third), Hare, trans., III.198
ATI: Stinginess 5, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.

#256. Catutthajjhaana Sutta.m, III.272

The Buddha enumerates five forms of miserliness which must be given up to enter the fourth jhana.

PTS: Musing (fourth), Hare, trans., III.198
ATI: Stinginess 6, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.

#256. Sotaapatti-Phala Sutta.m, III.272

The Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation and the Pali of this and the next three suttas were previously abridged and included as part of the preceding sutta.

The Buddha enumerates five forms of miserliness which must be given up to realize the fruit of Streamwinning.

PTS: Untitled (The Fruit of Streamwinning), Hare, trans., III.198
ATI: Stinginess 7, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.

#256. Sakadaagaami-Phala Sutta.m, III.272

The Buddha enumerates five forms of miserliness which must be given up to realize the fruit of Once-returning.

PTS: Untitled (The Fruit of Once-returning), Hare, trans., III.198
ATI: Stinginess 8, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.

#256. Anaagaami-Phala Sutta.m, III.272

The Buddha enumerates five forms of miserliness which must be given up to realize the fruit of Non-returning.

PTS: Untitled (The Fruit of Non-returning), Hare, trans., III.198
ATI: Stinginess 9, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.

#256. Arahatta-Phala Sutta.m, III.272

The Buddha enumerates five forms of miserliness which must be given up to realize the fruit of Arahantship.

PTS: Untitled (The Fruit of Arahantship), Hare, trans., III.198
ATI: Stinginess 10, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.

#264. Apara-Pa.thamajjhaana Sutta.m, III.272

(Covering suttas #264-271) Things which must be abandoned to enter the four jhana and the fruit of Streamwinning, Once-returning, Non-returning and Arahantship.

All the suttas from Ii 254 to Ii 271 should be read in one sitting, or first, Ii 254, then Ii 255, then Ii 256, then Ii 257-263, then IiIi 264-271. We're getting towards the end of the Fives here and they want to build you up to handling one of those monster wheel suttas at the end.
The BJT pali has these arranged such that the suttas on the jhanas are followed by the 'anothers' on the jhanas and the suttas on the paths are followed by the 'anothers' on the paths, and it ends the Upasampada-Vagga here. I have followed the PTS arrangement which is also followed by Bhk. Bodhi. Bhk. Bodhi's version calls what follows to the end of the Fives "Discourses Extra to the Chapter, and divides the materials into three 'Repetition Series''; the PTS just continues as if all the remaining suttas belonged to the Upasampada-Vagga. I have inserted the headings used by Bhk. Bodhi into Hare's translation but include the remaining suttas in the Upasampada-Vagga.

PTS: Another on Musing (first) Hare, trans., III.198
WP: 264. Another on the First Jhaana, 840

#265. Apara-Dutiyajjhaana Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: Another on Musing (second) Hare, trans., III.198
WP: 265-271. Another on the Second Jhaana, Etc., 841

#266. Apara-Tatiyajjhaana Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: Another on Musing (third) Hare, trans., III.198

#267. Apara-Catutthajjhaana Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: Another on Musing (fourth) Hare, trans., III.198

#268. Apara-Sotaapatti-Phala Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: Another Untitled (The Fruit of Streamwinning) Hare, trans., III.198

#269. Apara-Sakadaagaami-Phala Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: Another Untitled (The Fruit of Once-returning) Hare, trans., III.198

#270. Apara-Anaagaami-Phala Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: Another Untitled (The Fruit of Non-returning) Hare, trans., III.198

#271. Apara-Arahatta-Phala Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: Another Untitled (Arahantship) Hare, trans., III.198

WP and Ce: Vaggaatireka Suttaani. Sammuti Peyyaalam.

WP: Discourses Extra to the Chapter. I. Agreed Upon Repetition Series, 841.

#272. Bhattuddesaka Sutta.m, III.272

(Covering suttas # 272-277) Five things which characterize a bad food steward and five things which characterize a good food steward.

PTS: The Food-Steward (1), Hare, trans., III.198
WP: 272. An Assigner of Meals, 841

#273. Dutiya Bhattuddesaka Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: The Food-Steward (2), Hare, trans., III.198

#274. Tatiya Bhattuddesaka Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: The Food-Steward (3), Hare, trans., III.198

#275. Catuttha Bhattuddesaka Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: The Food-Steward (4), Hare, trans., III.198

#276. Pa~ncama Bhattuddesaka Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: The Food-Steward (5), Hare, trans., III.198

#PTS Ii 277 Hare has misnumbered this section. There is no #277. I have retained the numbering to eliminate possible confusion with references. Bhk. Bodhi has this whole section as one sutta, #272 which is probably the way it was originally intended. The Sutta numbering from here will not agree with the Wisdom Publications edition to the end of the Fives. The Index indicates the corresponding suttas.

#278. Senaasana-pa~n~naapako Sutta.m, III.278

(Covering suttas #278-282) Five things which characterize an incompetant alloter of quarters and five things which characterize a competant alloter of quarters.

PTS: He Who Allots Quarters (1), Hare, trans., III.198

#279. Dutiya Senaasana-Pa~n~naapako Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: He Who Allots Quarters (2), Hare, trans., III.198
WP: 273-284. An Appointer of Lodgings, Etc., 841

#280. Tatiya Senaasana-Pa~n~naapako Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: He Who Allots Quarters (3), Hare, trans., III.198

#281. Catuttha Senaasana-Pa~n~naapako Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: He Who Allots Quarters (4), Hare, trans., III.198

#282. Pa~ncama Senaasana-Pa~n~naapako Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: He Who Allots Quarters (5), Hare, trans., III.198

#283. Senaasanaggaahaapako Sutta.m, III.283

(Covering suttas #283-287) Five things which characterize an incompetant receiver of quarters and five things which characterize a competant receiver of quarters.
The PTS Pali omits this group, but Hare has included it in his translation. It is included in the Bhk. Bodhi translation and in the Pali he uses.
Bhk. Bodhi and apparently also Bhk. Thanissaro question the meaning of this group as compared to the previous. Hare has no explanation for his translation which does not make sense unless he was thinking of lodgings as being received from the lay community ... so and so many bhikkhus may reside in the kiln-shed of the layman so-and-so.

PTS: He Who Receives Quarters (1), Hare, trans., III.198

#284. Dutiya Senaasanaggaahaapako Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: He Who Receives Quarters (2), Hare, trans., III.198

#285. Tatiya Senaasanaggaahaapako Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: He Who Receives Quarters (3), Hare, trans., III.198

#286. Catuttha Senaasanaggaahaapako Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: He Who Receives Quarters (4), Hare, trans., III.198

#287. Pa~ncama Senaasanaggaahaapako Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: He Who Receives Quarters (5), Hare, trans., III.198

#288. Bha.n.daagaariko Sutta.m, III.288

(Covering suttas #288-292) Five things which characterize an incompetant stores-keeper and five things which characterize a competant stores-keeper.

PTS: He The Store-keeper (1), Hare, trans., III.198

#289. Dutiya Bha.n.daagaariko Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: He The Store-keeper (2), Hare, trans., III.198

#290. Tatiya Bha.n.daagaariko Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: He The Store-keeper (3), Hare, trans., III.198

#291. Catuttha Bha.n.daagaariko Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: He The Store-keeper (4), Hare, trans., III.198

#292. Pa~ncama Bha.n.daagaariko Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: He The Store-keeper (5), Hare, trans., III.198

#293. Ciivara-Pa.tiggaahako Sutta.m, III.293

(Covering suttas #293-297) Five things which characterize an incompetant robes-receiver and five things which characterize a competant robes-receiver.

PTS: He The Robes-receiver (1), Hare, trans., III.198

#294. Dutiya Ciivara-Pa.tiggaahako Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: He The Robes-receiver (2), Hare, trans., III.198

#295. Tatiya Ciivara-Pa.tiggaahako Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: He The Robes-receiver (3), Hare, trans., III.198

#296. Catuttha Ciivara-Pa.tiggaahako Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: He The Robes-receiver (4), Hare, trans., III.198

#297. Pa~ncama Ciivara-Pa.tiggaahako Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: He The Robes-receiver (5), Hare, trans., III.198

#298. Ciivara-Bhaajako Sutta.m, III.298

(Covering suttas #298-302) Five things which characterize an incompetant robes-distributor and five things which characterize a competant robes-distributor.

PTS: He He Who Metes Out Robes (1), Hare, trans., III.198

#299. Dutiya Ciivara-Bhaajako Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: He He Who Metes Out Robes (2), Hare, trans., III.198

#300. Tatiya Ciivara-Bhaajako Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: He He Who Metes Out Robes (3), Hare, trans., III.198

#301. Catuttha Ciivara-Bhaajako Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: He He Who Metes Out Robes (4), Hare, trans., III.198

#302. Pa~ncama Ciivara-Bhaajako Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: He He Who Metes Out Robes (5), Hare, trans., III.198

NOTE: AN 5.303-1152 Lust and So Forth Repetition Series, the Bhikkhu Bodhi translation.
Not linked to the Pali or PTS translations as it is highly abridged and there are numbering issues. To locate specific sutta-groups, refer back to this index.

#303. Yaagu-Baajako Sutta.m, III.303

(Covering suttas #303-307) Five things which characterize an incompetant gruel-distributor and five things which characterize a competant gruel-distributor.

PTS: He He Who Metes Out Gruel (1), Hare, trans., III.198

#304. Dutiya Yaagu-Baajako Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: He He Who Metes Out Gruel (2), Hare, trans., III.198

#305. Tatiya Yaagu-Baajako Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: He He Who Metes Out Gruel (3), Hare, trans., III.198

#306. Catuttha Yaagu-Baajako Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: He He Who Metes Out Gruel (4), Hare, trans., III.198

#307. Pa~ncama Yaagu-Baajako Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: He He Who Metes Out Gruel (5), Hare, trans., III.198

#308. Phala-Bhaajako Sutta.m, III.303

(Covering suttas #308-312) Five things which characterize an incompetant fruit-distributor and five things which characterize a competant fruit-distributor.

PTS: He He Who Metes Out Fruit (1), Hare, trans., III.198

#309. Dutiya Phala-Bhaajako Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: He He Who Metes Out Fruit (2), Hare, trans., III.198

#310. Tatiya Phala-Bhaajako Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: He He Who Metes Out Fruit (3), Hare, trans., III.198

#311. Catuttha Phala-Bhaajako Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: He He Who Metes Out Fruit (4), Hare, trans., III.198

#312. Pa~ncama Phala-Bhaajako Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: He He Who Metes Out Fruit (5), Hare, trans., III.198

#313. Khajjaka-Bhaajako Sutta.m, III.303

(Covering suttas #313-317) Five things which characterize an incompetant other-edibles-distributor and five things which characterize a competant other-edibles-distributor.

PTS: He He Who Metes Out Food (1), Hare, trans., III.198

#314. Dutiya Khajjaka-Bhaajako Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: He He Who Metes Out Food (2), Hare, trans., III.198

#315. Tatiya Khajjaka-Bhaajako Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: He He Who Metes Out Food (3), Hare, trans., III.198

#316. Catuttha Khajjaka-Bhaajako Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: He He Who Metes Out Food (4), Hare, trans., III.198

#317. Pa~ncama Khajjaka-Bhaajako Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: He He Who Metes Out Food (5), Hare, trans., III.198

#318. Appamattakavissajjako Sutta.m, III.303

(Covering suttas #318-322) Five things which characterize an incompetant small-things-distributor and five things which characterize a competant small-things-distributor.

PTS: He He Who Metes Out Small Things (1), Hare, trans., III.198

#319. Dutiya Appamattakavissajjako Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: He He Who Metes Out Small Things (2), Hare, trans., III.198

#320. Tatiya Appamattakavissajjako Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: He He Who Metes Out Small Things (3), Hare, trans., III.198

#321. Catuttha Appamattakavissajjako Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: He He Who Metes Out Small Things (4), Hare, trans., III.198

#322. Pa~ncama Appamattakavissajjako Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: He He Who Metes Out Small Things (5), Hare, trans., III.198

#323. Saa.tiyagaahaapako Sutta.m, III.303

(Covering suttas #323-327) Five things which characterize an incompetant allocator of under-cloth and five things which characterize a competant allocator of under-cloth.

PTS: He The Receiver of Undergarments (1), Hare, trans., III.198

#324. Dutiya Saa.tiyagaahaapako Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: He The Receiver of Undergarments (2), Hare, trans., III.198

#325. Tatiya Saa.tiyagaahaapako Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: He The Receiver of Undergarments (3), Hare, trans., III.198

#326. Catuttha Saa.tiyagaahaapako Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: He The Receiver of Undergarments (4), Hare, trans., III.198

#327. Pa~ncama Saa.tiyagaahaapako Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: He The Receiver of Undergarments (5), Hare, trans., III.198

#328. Pattaggaahaapako Sutta.m, III.303

(Covering suttas #328-332) Five things which characterize an incompetant allocator of bowls and five things which characterize a competant allocator of bowls.

PTS: He The Receiver of Bowls (1), Hare, trans., III.198

#329. Dutiya Pattaggaahaapako Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: He The Receiver of Bowls (2), Hare, trans., III.198

#330. Tatiya Pattaggaahaapako Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: He The Receiver of Bowls (3), Hare, trans., III.198

#331. Catuttha Pattaggaahaapako Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: He The Receiver of Bowls (4), Hare, trans., III.198

#332. Pa~ncama Pattaggaahaapako Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: He The Receiver of Bowls (5), Hare, trans., III.198

#333. Aaraamikapesako Sutta.m, III.303

(Covering suttas #333-337) Five things which characterize an incompetant supervisor of park attendants and five things which characterize a competant supervisor of park attendants.

PTS: He He Who Looks after the Park-Keepers (1), Hare, trans., III.198

#334. Dutiya Aaraamikapesako Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: He He Who Looks after the Park-Keepers (2), Hare, trans., III.198

#335. Tatiya Aaraamikapesako Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: He He Who Looks after the Park-Keepers (3), Hare, trans., III.198

#336. Catuttha Aaraamikapesako Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: He He Who Looks after the Park-Keepers (4), Hare, trans., III.198

#337. Pa~ncama Aaraamikapesako Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: He He Who Looks after the Park-Keepers (5), Hare, trans., III.198

#338. Saama.nerapesako Sutta.m, III.303

(Covering suttas #338-342) Five things which characterize an incompetant supervisor of the novices and five things which characterize a competant supervisor of the novices.

PTS: He He Who Looks after the the Novices (1), Hare, trans., III.198

#339. Dutiya Saama.nerapesako Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: He He Who Looks after the the Novices (2), Hare, trans., III.198

#340. Tatiya Saama.nerapesako Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: He He Who Looks after the the Novices (3), Hare, trans., III.198

#341. Catuttha Saama.nerapesako Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: He He Who Looks after the the Novices (4), Hare, trans., III.198

#342. Pa~ncama Saama.nerapesako Sutta.m, III.272

PTS: He He Who Looks after the the Novices (5), Hare, trans., III.198
WP: 285. A Supervisor of Novices, 845

Sikkhapada Peyyala.m III. 199.

PTS: The Fivefold, III. 199.
WP: Training Rules Repetition Series, 847

#343. Bhikkhu Sutta.m, III.273

(Covering suttas #343-360) Five behaviors and land one in Hell, five that land one in heaven.

PTS: The Monk, Hare, trans., III.199
WP: 286. A Bhikkhu, 847

#344. Bhikkhunii Sutta.m, III.273

PTS: Nun, Hare, trans., III.199
WP: 287-290. A Bhikkhunii, Etc., 847

#345. Sikkhamaanaa Sutta.m, III.273

PTS: Those in Training, Hare, trans., III.199

#346. Saama.nera Sutta.m, III.273

PTS: Male Novice, Hare, trans., III.199

#347. Saama.nerii Sutta.m, III.273

PTS: Female Novice, Hare, trans., III.199

#348. Upaasaka Sutta.m, III.273

PTS: Male Lay Disciple, Hare, trans., III.199
WP: 291-292. A Male and Female Lay Follower, 847

#349. Upaasikaa Sutta.m, III.273

PTS: Female Lay Disciple, Hare, trans., III.199

[There is no PTS #350]

#351. Aajivaka Sutta.m, III.273

PTS: The Ascetic, Hare, trans., III.199
An Aajiivaka, 848

#352. Niga.n.tha Sutta.m, III.273

PTS: The Jain, Hare, trans., III.199
WP: 294-302. An Niga.n.tha, Etc.,, 848

#353. Mu.n.dasaavaka Sutta.m, III.273

PTS: The Shaveling, Hare, trans., III.199

#354. Ja.tilaka Sutta.m, III.273

PTS: Him with Braided Hair, Hare, trans., III.199

#355. Paribbaajaka Sutta.m, III.273

PTS: The Wanderer, Hare, trans., III.199

#356. Maagandika Sutta.m, III.273

PTS: The Follower of Maga.n.da, Hare, trans., III.199

#357. Teda.n.dika Sutta.m, III.273

PTS: The Follower of the Sect of the Tripple Staff, Hare, trans., III.199

#358. Aaruddhaka Sutta.m, III.273

PTS: The Follower of the Unobstructed, Hare, trans., III.199

#359. Gotamaka Sutta.m, III.273

PTS: The Follower of the Sect of Gotama, Hare, trans., III.199

#360. Devadhammika Sutta.m, III.273

PTS: The Follower of Deva Rites, Hare, trans., III.199

Raagaa Peyyaala.m

(Covering suttas #361-410) Five conditions are listed in each of five different suttas in each of ten different groups: higher understanding, comprehension, thorough destruction, letting go, destruction, wafting away, dispassion towards, ending of, giving up of, and all-round-abandoning of passion. A mind-twistu.

WP: Lust and So Forth Repetition Series 848
PTS: Passion (Repetition Series).

#361-365. Raagassa Abhi~n~naaya Sutta.m 1-5
#366-370. Raagassa Pari~n~naaya Sutta.m 1-5
#371-375. Raagassa Parikkhayaaya Sutta.m 1-5
#376-380. Raagassa Pahaanaaya Sutta.m 1-5
#381-385. Raagassa Khayaaya Sutta.m 1-5
#386-390. Raagassa Vayaaya Sutta.m 1-5
#391-395. Raagassa Viraagaaya Sutta.m 1-5
#396-400. Raagassa Nirodhaaya Sutta.m 1-5
#401-405. Raagassa Caagaaya Sutta.m 1-5
#406-410. Raagassa Pa.tinissaggaaya Sutta.m 1-5 III.277

PTS: #361-365. Full Understanding of Passion 1-5,
WP: 303, 304, 305, 306, 307, p 848
#366-370. Comprehension of Passion 1-5
#371-375. Exhaustion of Passion 1-5
#376-380. Abandoning of Passion 1-5
#381-385. Destruction of Passion 1-5
#386-390. Decay of Passion 1-5
#391-395. Freedom from Passion 1-5
#396-400. Ending of Passion 1-5
#401-405. Quittance of Passion 1-5
#406-410. Renunciation of Passion 1-5, Hare, trans., III.200
WP: 308-316, p 848

[The PTS Translation has misnumbered this section as #s 361-400]

Dosa Peyyaala.m

(Covering suttas #411-460) Five conditions are listed in each of five different suttas in each of ten different groups: higher understanding, comprehension, thorough destruction, letting go, destruction, wafting away, dispassion towards, ending of, giving up of, and all-round-abandoning of hatred. A mind-twistu.

PTS: Hatred (Repetition Series).

#411-415. Dosassa Abhi~n~naaya Sutta.m 1-5
#416-420. Dosassa Pari~n~naaya Sutta.m 1-5
#421-425. Dosassa Parikkhayaaya Sutta.m 1-5
#426-430. Dosassa Pahaanaaya Sutta.m 1-5
#431-435. Dosassa Khayaaya Sutta.m 1-5
#436-440. Dosassa Vayaaya Sutta.m 1-5
#441-445. Dosassa Viraagaaya Sutta.m 1-5
#446-450. Dosassa Nirodhaaya Sutta.m 1-5
#451-455. Dosassa Caagaaya Sutta.m 1-5
#456-460. Dosassa Pa.tinissaggaaya Sutta.m 1-5 III.277

PTS: #411-415. Full Understanding of Hatred 1-5,
WP: 303, 304, 305, 306, 307, p 848
#416-420. Comprehension of Hatred 1-5
#421-425. Exhaustion of Hatred 1-5
#426-430. Abandoning of Hatred 1-5
#431-435. Destruction of Hatred 1-5
#436-440. Decay of Hatred 1-5
#441-445. Freedom from Hatred 1-5
#446-450. Ending of Hatred 1-5
#451-455. Quittance of Hatred 1-5
#456-460. Renunciation of Hatred 1-5, Hare, trans., III.200
WP: 308-316, p 848

Moha Peyyaala.m

(Covering suttas #461-510) Five conditions are listed in each of five different suttas in each of ten different groups: higher understanding, comprehension, thorough destruction, letting go, destruction, wafting away, dispassion towards, ending of, giving up of, and all-round-abandoning of illusion.

PTS: Illusion (Repetition Series).

#461-510. Mohassa Abhi~n~naaya Sutta.m 1-5
Mohassa Pari~n~naaya Sutta.m 1-5
Mohassa Parikkhayaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Mohassa Pahaanaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Mohassa Khayaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Mohassa Vayaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Mohassa Viraagaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Mohassa Nirodhaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Mohassa Caagaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Mohassa Pa.tinissaggaaya Sutta.m 1-5
III.277

PTS: #461-465. Full Understanding of Illusion 1-5,
WP: 303, 304, 305, 306, 307, p 848
PTS: #466-510. Comprehension of Illusion 1-5
Exhaustion of Illusion 1-5
Abandoning of Illusion 1-5
Destruction of Illusion 1-5
Decay of Illusion 1-5
Freedom from Illusion 1-5
Ending of Illusion 1-5
Quittance of Illusion 1-5
Renunciation of Illusion 1-5, Hare, trans., III.200
WP: 308-316, p 848

Kodha Peyyaala.m

(Covering suttas #511-560) Five conditions are listed in each of five different suttas in each of ten different groups: higher understanding, comprehension, thorough destruction, letting go, destruction, wafting away, dispassion towards, ending of, giving up of, and all-round-abandoning of anger.

PTS: Anger (Repetition Series).

#511-560. Kodhassa Abhi~n~naaya Sutta.m 1-5
Kodhassa Pari~n~naaya Sutta.m 1-5
Kodhassa Parikkhayaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Kodhassa Pahaanaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Kodhassa Khayaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Kodhassa Vayaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Kodhassa Viraagaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Kodhassa Nirodhaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Kodhassa Caagaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Kodhassa Pa.tinissaggaaya Sutta.m 1-5
III.277

PTS: #511-560. Full Understanding of Anger 1-5,
Comprehension of Anger 1-5
Exhaustion of Anger 1-5
Abandoning of Anger 1-5
Destruction of Anger 1-5
Decay of Anger 1-5
Freedom from Anger 1-5
Ending of Anger 1-5
Quittance of Anger 1-5
Renunciation of Anger 1-5, Hare, trans., III.200

Upanaaha Peyyaala.m

(Covering suttas #561-610) Five conditions are listed in each of five different suttas in each of ten different groups: higher understanding, comprehension, thorough destruction, letting go, destruction, wafting away, dispassion towards, ending of, giving up of, and all-round-abandoning of enmity.

PTS: Enmity (Repetition Series).

#561-610. Upanaahassa Abhi~n~naaya Sutta.m 1-5
Upanaahassa Pari~n~naaya Sutta.m 1-5
Upanaahassa Parikkhayaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Upanaahassa Pahaanaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Upanaahassa Khayaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Upanaahassa Vayaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Upanaahassa Viraagaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Upanaahassa Nirodhaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Upanaahassa Caagaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Upanaahassa Pa.tinissaggaaya Sutta.m 1-5
III.277

PTS: #561-610. Full Understanding of Enmity 1-5,
Comprehension of Enmity 1-5
Exhaustion of Enmity 1-5
Abandoning of Enmity 1-5
Destruction of Enmity 1-5
Decay of Enmity 1-5
Freedom from Enmity 1-5
Ending of Enmity 1-5
Quittance of Enmity 1-5
Renunciation of Enmity 1-5, Hare, trans., III.200

Makkha Peyyaala.m

(Covering suttas #611-660) Five conditions are listed in each of five different suttas in each of ten different groups: higher understanding, comprehension, thorough destruction, letting go, destruction, wafting away, dispassion towards, ending of, giving up of, and all-round-abandoning of hypocrisy.

PTS: Hypocrisy (Repetition Series).

#611-660. Makkhassa Abhi~n~naaya Sutta.m 1-5
Makkhassa Pari~n~naaya Sutta.m 1-5
Makkhassa Parikkhayaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Makkhassa Pahaanaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Makkhassa Khayaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Makkhassa Vayaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Makkhassa Viraagaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Makkhassa Nirodhaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Makkhassa Caagaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Makkhassa Pa.tinissaggaaya Sutta.m 1-5
III.277

PTS: #611-660. Full Understanding of Hypocrisy 1-5,
Comprehension of Hypocrisy 1-5
Exhaustion of Hypocrisy 1-5
Abandoning of Hypocrisy 1-5
Destruction of Hypocrisy 1-5
Decay of Hypocrisy 1-5
Freedom from Hypocrisy 1-5
Ending of Hypocrisy 1-5
Quittance of Hypocrisy 1-5
Renunciation of Hypocrisy 1-5, Hare, trans., III.200

Pa.laasa Peyyaala.m

(Covering suttas #661-710) Five conditions are listed in each of five different suttas in each of ten different groups: higher understanding, comprehension, thorough destruction, letting go, destruction, wafting away, dispassion towards, ending of, giving up of, and all-round-abandoning of malice.

PTS: Malice (Repetition Series).

#661-710. Pa.laasassa Abhi~n~naaya Sutta.m 1-5
Pa.laasassa Pari~n~naaya Sutta.m 1-5
Pa.laasassa Parikkhayaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Pa.laasassa Pahaanaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Pa.laasassa Khayaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Pa.laasassa Vayaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Pa.laasassa Viraagaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Pa.laasassa Nirodhaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Pa.laasassa Caagaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Pa.laasassa Pa.tinissaggaaya Sutta.m 1-5
III.277

PTS: #661-710. Full Understanding of Malice 1-5,
Comprehension of Malice 1-5
Exhaustion of Malice 1-5
Abandoning of Malice 1-5
Destruction of Malice 1-5
Decay of Malice 1-5
Freedom from Malice 1-5
Ending of Malice 1-5
Quittance of Malice 1-5
Renunciation of Malice 1-5, Hare, trans., III.200

Issaa Peyyaala.m

(Covering suttas #711-760) Five conditions are listed in each of five different suttas in each of ten different groups: higher understanding, comprehension, thorough destruction, letting go, destruction, wafting away, dispassion towards, ending of, giving up of, and all-round-abandoning of envy.

PTS: Envy (Repetition Series).

#711-760. Issaaya Abhi~n~naaya Sutta.m 1-5
Issaaya Pari~n~naaya Sutta.m 1-5
Issaaya Parikkhayaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Issaaya Pahaanaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Issaaya Khayaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Issaaya Vayaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Issaaya Viraagaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Issaaya Nirodhaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Issaaya Caagaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Issaaya Pa.tinissaggaaya Sutta.m 1-5
III.277

PTS: #711-760. Full Understanding of Envy 1-5,
Comprehension of Envy 1-5
Exhaustion of Envy 1-5
Abandoning of Envy 1-5
Destruction of Envy 1-5
Decay of Envy 1-5
Freedom from Envy 1-5
Ending of Envy 1-5
Quittance of Envy 1-5
Renunciation of Envy 1-5, Hare, trans., III.200

Macchariya Peyyaala.m

(Covering suttas #761-810) Five conditions are listed in each of five different suttas in each of ten different groups: higher understanding, comprehension, thorough destruction, letting go, destruction, wafting away, dispassion towards, ending of, giving up of, and all-round-abandoning of avarice.

PTS: Avarice (Repetition Series).

#761-810. Macchariyassa Abhi~n~naaya Sutta.m 1-5
Macchariyassa Pari~n~naaya Sutta.m 1-5
Macchariyassa Parikkhayaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Macchariyassa Pahaanaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Macchariyassa Khayaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Macchariyassa Vayaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Macchariyassa Viraagaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Macchariyassa Nirodhaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Macchariyassa Caagaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Macchariyassa Pa.tinissaggaaya Sutta.m 1-5
III.277

PTS: #761-810. Full Understanding of Avarice 1-5,
Comprehension of Avarice 1-5
Exhaustion of Avarice 1-5
Abandoning of Avarice 1-5
Destruction of Avarice 1-5
Decay of Avarice 1-5
Freedom from Avarice 1-5
Ending of Avarice 1-5
Quittance of Avarice 1-5
Renunciation of Avarice 1-5, Hare, trans., III.200

Maayaa Peyyaala.m

(Covering suttas #811-860) Five conditions are listed in each of five different suttas in each of ten different groups: higher understanding, comprehension, thorough destruction, letting go, destruction, wafting away, dispassion towards, ending of, giving up of, and all-round-abandoning of deceit.

PTS: Deceit (Repetition Series).

#811-860. Maayaaya Abhi~n~naaya Sutta.m 1-5
Maayaaya Pari~n~naaya Sutta.m 1-5
Maayaaya Parikkhayaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Maayaaya Pahaanaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Maayaaya Khayaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Maayaaya Vayaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Maayaaya Viraagaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Maayaaya Nirodhaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Maayaaya Caagaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Maayaaya Pa.tinissaggaaya Sutta.m 1-5
III.277

PTS: #811-860. Full Understanding of Deceit 1-5,
Comprehension of Deceit 1-5
Exhaustion of Deceit 1-5
Abandoning of Deceit 1-5
Destruction of Deceit 1-5
Decay of Deceit 1-5
Freedom from Deceit 1-5
Ending of Deceit 1-5
Quittance of Deceit 1-5
Renunciation of Deceit 1-5, Hare, trans., III.200

Saa.theyya Peyyaala.m

(Covering suttas #861-910) Five conditions are listed in each of five different suttas in each of ten different groups: higher understanding, comprehension, thorough destruction, letting go, destruction, wafting away, dispassion towards, ending of, giving up of, and all-round-abandoning of craftiness.

PTS: Craftiness (Repetition Series).

#861-910. Saa.theyyassa Abhi~n~naaya Sutta.m 1-5
Saa.theyyassa Pari~n~naaya Sutta.m 1-5
Saa.theyyassa Parikkhayaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Saa.theyyassa Pahaanaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Saa.theyyassa Khayaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Saa.theyyassa Vayaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Saa.theyyassa Viraagaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Saa.theyyassa Nirodhaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Saa.theyyassa Caagaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Saa.theyyassa Pa.tinissaggaaya Sutta.m 1-5
III.277

PTS: #861-910. Full Understanding of Craftiness 1-5,
Comprehension of Craftiness 1-5
Exhaustion of Craftiness 1-5
Abandoning of Craftiness 1-5
Destruction of Craftiness 1-5
Decay of Craftiness 1-5
Freedom from Craftiness 1-5
Ending of Craftiness 1-5
Quittance of Craftiness 1-5
Renunciation of Craftiness 1-5, Hare, trans., III.200

Thambha Peyyaala.m

(Covering suttas #911-960) Five conditions are listed in each of five different suttas in each of ten different groups: higher understanding, comprehension, thorough destruction, letting go, destruction, wafting away, dispassion towards, ending of, giving up of, and all-round-abandoning of obstinacy.

PTS: Obstinacy (Repetition Series).

#911-960. Thambhassa Abhi~n~naaya Sutta.m 1-5
Thambhassa Pari~n~naaya Sutta.m 1-5
Thambhassa Parikkhayaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Thambhassa Pahaanaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Thambhassa Khayaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Thambhassa Vayaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Thambhassa Viraagaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Thambhassa Nirodhaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Thambhassa Caagaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Thambhassa Pa.tinissaggaaya Sutta.m 1-5
III.277

PTS: #911-960. Full Understanding of Obstinacy 1-5,
Comprehension of Obstinacy 1-5
Exhaustion of Obstinacy 1-5
Abandoning of Obstinacy 1-5
Destruction of Obstinacy 1-5
Decay of Obstinacy 1-5
Freedom from Obstinacy 1-5
Ending of Obstinacy 1-5
Quittance of Obstinacy 1-5
Renunciation of Obstinacy 1-5, Hare, trans., III.200

Saarambha Peyyaala.m

(Covering suttas #961-1010) Five conditions are listed in each of five different suttas in each of ten different groups: higher understanding, comprehension, thorough destruction, letting go, destruction, wafting away, dispassion towards, ending of, giving up of, and all-round-abandoning of impetuosity.

PTS: Impetuosity (Repetition Series).

#961-1010. Saarambhassa Abhi~n~naaya Sutta.m 1-5
Saarambhassa Pari~n~naaya Sutta.m 1-5
Saarambhassa Parikkhayaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Saarambhassa Pahaanaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Saarambhassa Khayaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Saarambhassa Vayaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Saarambhassa Viraagaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Saarambhassa Nirodhaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Saarambhassa Caagaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Saarambhassa Pa.tinissaggaaya Sutta.m 1-5
III.277

PTS: #961-1010. Full Understanding of Impetuosity 1-5,
Comprehension of Impetuosity 1-5
Exhaustion of Impetuosity 1-5
Abandoning of Impetuosity 1-5
Destruction of Impetuosity 1-5
Decay of Impetuosity 1-5
Freedom from Impetuosity 1-5
Ending of Impetuosity 1-5
Quittance of Impetuosity 1-5
Renunciation of Impetuosity 1-5, Hare, trans., III.200

Maana Peyyaala.m

(Covering suttas #1011-1060) Five conditions are listed in each of five different suttas in each of ten different groups: higher understanding, comprehension, thorough destruction, letting go, destruction, wafting away, dispassion towards, ending of, giving up of, and all-round-abandoning of pride.

PTS: Pride (Repetition Series).

#1011-1060. Maanassa Abhi~n~naaya Sutta.m 1-5
Maanassa Pari~n~naaya Sutta.m 1-5
Maanassa Parikkhayaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Maanassa Pahaanaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Maanassa Khayaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Maanassa Vayaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Maanassa Viraagaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Maanassa Nirodhaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Maanassa Caagaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Maanassa Pa.tinissaggaaya Sutta.m 1-5
III.277

PTS: #1011-1060. Full Understanding of Pride 1-5,
Comprehension of Pride 1-5
Exhaustion of Pride 1-5
Abandoning of Pride 1-5
Destruction of Pride 1-5
Decay of Pride 1-5
Freedom from Pride 1-5
Ending of Pride 1-5
Quittance of Pride 1-5
Renunciation of Pride 1-5, Hare, trans., III.200

Atimaana Peyyaala.m

(Covering suttas #1061-1110) Five conditions are listed in each of five different suttas in each of ten different groups: higher understanding, comprehension, thorough destruction, letting go, destruction, wafting away, dispassion towards, ending of, giving up of, and all-round-abandoning of indolence.

PTS: Arrogance (Repetition Series).

#1061-1110. Atimaanassa Abhi~n~naaya Sutta.m 1-5
Atimaanassa Pari~n~naaya Sutta.m 1-5
Atimaanassa Parikkhayaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Atimaanassa Pahaanaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Atimaanassa Khayaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Atimaanassa Vayaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Atimaanassa Viraagaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Atimaanassa Nirodhaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Atimaanassa Caagaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Atimaanassa Pa.tinissaggaaya Sutta.m 1-5
III.277

PTS: #1061-1110. Full Understanding of Arrogance 1-5,
Comprehension of Arrogance 1-5
Exhaustion of Arrogance 1-5
Abandoning of Arrogance 1-5
Destruction of Arrogance 1-5
Decay of Arrogance 1-5
Freedom from Arrogance 1-5
Ending of Arrogance 1-5
Quittance of Arrogance 1-5
Renunciation of Arrogance 1-5, Hare, trans., III.200

Mada Peyyaala.m

(Covering suttas #1111-1160) Five conditions are listed in each of five different suttas in each of ten different groups: higher understanding, comprehension, thorough destruction, letting go, destruction, wafting away, dispassion towards, ending of, giving up of, and all-round-abandoning of intoxication.

PTS: Intoxication (Repetition Series).

#1111-1160. Madassa Abhi~n~naaya Sutta.m 1-5
Madassa Pari~n~naaya Sutta.m 1-5
Madassa Parikkhayaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Madassa Pahaanaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Madassa Khayaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Madassa Vayaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Madassa Viraagaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Madassa Nirodhaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Madassa Caagaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Madassa Pa.tinissaggaaya Sutta.m 1-5
III.277

PTS: #1111-1160. Full Understanding of Intoxication 1-5,
Comprehension of Intoxication 1-5
Exhaustion of Intoxication 1-5
Abandoning of Intoxication 1-5
Destruction of Intoxication 1-5
Decay of Intoxication 1-5
Freedom from Intoxication 1-5
Ending of Intoxication 1-5
Quittance of Intoxication 1-5
Renunciation of Intoxication 1-5, Hare, trans., III.200

Pamaada Peyyaala.m

(Covering suttas #1161-1210) Five conditions are listed in each of five different suttas in each of ten different groups: higher understanding, comprehension, thorough destruction, letting go, destruction, wafting away, dispassion towards, ending of, giving up of, and all-round-abandoning of indolence.

PTS: Indolence (Repetition Series).

#1161-1210. Pamaadasssa Abhi~n~naaya Sutta.m 1-5
Pamaadasssa Pari~n~naaya Sutta.m 1-5
Pamaadasssa Parikkhayaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Pamaadasssa Pahaanaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Pamaadasssa Khayaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Pamaadasssa Vayaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Pamaadasssa Viraagaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Pamaadasssa Nirodhaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Pamaadasssa Caagaaya Sutta.m 1-5
Pamaadasssa Pa.tinissaggaaya Sutta.m 1-5
III.277

PTS: #1161-1210. Full Understanding of Indolence 1-5,
Comprehension of Indolence 1-5
Exhaustion of Indolence 1-5
Abandoning of Indolence 1-5
Destruction of Indolence 1-5
Decay of Indolence 1-5
Freedom from Indolence 1-5
Ending of Indolence 1-5
Quittance of Indolence 1-5
Renunciation of Indolence 1-5, Hare, trans., III.200

#1161-1200. III.278

PTS: Of other conditions, Hare, trans., III.201
WP: 317-1152, 848

 


 

In this digital conversion and formatting of the Pali Text Society translation of the Anguttara Nikaya: The Book of the Fives. all the translations and the Pali have been completely unabridged, including the last 1000 suttas of the monster wheel sutta that concludes this book. (That's 1000 suttas that have not been seen fully rolled-out since the suttas were first set into writing! There is no way the beauty of this creation can be appreciated without seeing something like this. Nobody could possibly say that the suttas are repetitious reading this. There are 1000 suttas they are all saying the same thing and not one of them is an exact duplicate of any of the others.) Every sutta is linked to it's Pali text and wherever possible to other translations. Both the translation and Pali have been formatted keeping ease of reading and comprehension in mind. The Pali text was read through once by me, comparing it to the PTS Pali and adjusting the text in most cases to that of the PTS Pali.

 

Repetition Series Vocabulary

Abhi~n~naaya Higher Understanding
Pari~n~naaya Comprehension
Parikkhayaaya Thorough Destruction
Pahaanaaya Letting Go
Khayaaya Destruction
Vayaya Blowing Away
Viragaaya Dispassion Towards
Nirodhaaya Ending
Caagaaya Giving Up
Pa.tinisaggaaya Renunciation

Raaga Lust
Dosa Hatred
Moha delusion
Kodha Anger
Upanaaha Enmity
Makkhassa Slandering (lit. sliming)
Pa.laasa Ruthlessness
Issaaya Envy
Macchariya Avarice
Maayaaya Deceit
Saatheyya Craftiness
Thambha Stubbornness
Saarambha Impulsivity
Maana Pride
Atimaana Arrogance
Mada Insobriety
Pamaada Carelessness

Asubha-sa~n~naa, the perception of the unpleasant,
aadiinava-sa~n~naa, the perception of the danger
aahaare pa.tikkuula-sa~n~naa, the perception of the repulsiveness of food
sabbaloke anabhirata-sa~n~naa, the perception: whole-world no fun,
Anicca-sa~n~naa, the perception of instability
anatta-sa~n~naa, the perception of non-self
anicce dukkha-sa~n~naa, the perception of pain in instability
dukkhe anatta-sa~n~naa, the perception of non-self in pain
pahaana-sa~n~naa, the perception of letting go
viraaga-sa~n~naa, the perception of dispassion
Saddhindriya.m, the force of faith
viriyindriya.m, the force of energy
satindriya.m, the force of memory
samaadhindriya.m, the force of serenity
pa~n~nindriya.m, the force of wisdom
Saddhaabala.m, the power of faith
viriyabala.m, the power of energy
satibala.m, the power of memory
samaadhibala.m, the power of serenity
pa~n~naabala.m, the power of wisdom.


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