Anguttara Nikaya


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A'nguttara-Nikaaya
I. Ekanipaata

The Book of the
Gradual Sayings
or
More-Numbered Suttas

Part I
The Book of the Ones

Suttas 211-234

Translated from the Pali by
F.L. Woodward, M.A.

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(c) [continued]

[211][olds] Monks, chief among my disciples
who are first to receive food-tickets
is Ku.n.da-Dhaana.[71]

[212][olds] Monks, chief among my disciples
who are pre-eminent for ready wit
is Vangiisa.[72]

[213][olds] Monks, chief among my disciples
who are altogether charming[73]
is Upasena, Vanganta's son.

[214][olds] Monks, chief among my disciples
who assign quarters
is Dabba of the Mallas.[74]

[215][olds] Monks, chief among my disciples
who are dear and delightful to the devas
is Pilindavaccha.[75]

[216][olds] Monks, chief among my disciples
who are quick to win abnormal powers
is Baahiya the Bark-clad.[76]

[217][olds] Monks, chief among my disciples
who are brilliant speakers
is Kassapa the Boy.[77]

[218][olds] Monks, chief among my disciples
who are masters of logical analysis
is Ko.t.thita the Great.[78]

(d).

[219][olds] 'Monks, chief among my disciples,
monks who are of wide knowledge,
is Aananda.[79]

[220][olds] 'Monks, chief among my disciples,
monks who are of retentive memory,[80]
is Aananda

[221][olds] 'Monks, chief among my disciples,
monks who are of good behaviour,[81]
is Aananda.

[222][olds] 'Monks, chief among my disciples,
monks who are who are resolute,[82]
is Aananda

[223][olds] 'Monks, chief among my disciples,
monks who are personal attendants,
is Aananda.

[224][olds] 'Monks, chief among my disciples,
monks who are of large followings,
is Kassapa of Uruve'aa.[83]

[225][olds] 'Monks, chief among my disciples,
monks who are good at reconciling families,
is Kaaludaayin.[84]

[226][olds] 'Monks, chief among my disciples,
monks who are of good health,
is Bakkula.[85]

[227][olds] 'Monks, chief among my disciples,
monks who are able to recall past existences,
is Sobhita.[86]

[228][olds] 'Monks, chief among my disciples,
monks who know the disciplinary rules by heart,
is Upaali.[87]

[229][olds] 'Monks, chief among my disciples,
monks who are admonishers of the nuns,
is Nandaka.[88]

[230][olds] 'Monks, chief among my disciples,
monks who guard the doors of sense,
is Nanda.[89]

[231][olds] 'Monks, chief among my disciples,
monks who are admonishers of the monks,
is Kappina the Great.[90]

[232][olds] 'Monks, chief among my disciples,
monks good at contemplation of the heat-element,
is Saagata.[91]

[233][olds] 'Monks, chief among my disciples,
monks impromptu speakers,
is Raadha.[92]

[234][olds] 'Monks, chief among my disciples,
monks wearers of coarse robes,
is Mogharaajan.[93]

 


[71] Cf. Brethr. 19; Ap. 81. The name is that of a town of the Koliyans (UdA. 122). Ku.n.da was a yakkha who lived in a forest. Comy. calls him Dhaana-Ko.n.da (? crooked, cripple). Cf. SA. ii on S. iv, 63 (Pu.n.na).

[72] Cf. Brethr. 395; Ap. 495. A 'skull-tapper' or psychometrizer of dead men's skulls. The story is told at Comy. on Dhp. v, 419. His name gives the title to S. i, viii (K.S. i, 234).

[73] Saamanta-pasaadiikaa (also the title of the Vinaya Comy.), Cf. Brethr. 261,422; UdA. 266, acc. to which he was younger brother of Saariputta. He was complimented by the Master on his charming retinue: Ap. 62.

[74] Cf. Brethr. l0; Ap. 471, sen¢sana'n pa~n~naapayi'n haasayitvaana; Vin. ii. 305. He appears to have been a skilled major domo, and is credited with having lighted the brethren to their quarters by his magically illuminated thumb. Cf. Gotama the Man, 178.

[75] Cf. Brethr. 14; Ap. 59; UdA. 192. Pilinda his name, Vaccha his clan. He was waited on by a former disciple, reborn as a deva.

[76] Cf. UdA. 77; Ap. 475. He was of Bahiya and wore robes of fibrous bark (daaruciira). Acc. to our Comy. he attained arahantship just on hearing an address, without previous study: hence the title. It is curious that he is not mentioned in Theragaathaa. Verse 101 of Dhp. is ascribed to him.

[77] Cf. Brethr. 147; Ap. 473. So called because he joined the Order young.

[78] Cf. Brethr. 6; Ap. 479; S. ii, 112. For pa.tisambhidaa see supra, Ii 13 n. See also refs. below on p. 118 of text.

[79] Cf. Brethr. 349; Ap. 52. The loyal disciple, cousin and constant attendant for twenty years of the Master. So called at birth: 'born to bliss.' He is said to have become Arahant after the Buddha's death and just before the First Council.

[80] Satimant. He could remember all the Buddha said.

[81] Gatimant. Acc. to Dhammapaala 'good at walking.'

[82] Dhitimant.

[83] Cf. Brethr. 206; Ap. 481. One of three brothers of this name.

[84] Cf. Brethr. 248; Ap. 85, 500. Born on the same day as the Buddha, and his play-fellow. So called from his dark complexion. He was able to induce the Buddha to visit his father Suddhodana.

[85] Or Baakula. Cf. Brethr. 159. Comy. derives the name from baa-kula (two families); bi-kin, as Mrs. Rhys Davids turns it. Swallowed as a child by a fish (a Jonah), he was cut out and brought up by a fisherman's wife. The parents and foster-parents therefore shared him by the king's command. Living eighty years on a 'two-finger' allowance of rice he never had the slightest ailment. Ap. 330, deva-bhuuto manusso vaa app¢baadho bhavissati.

[86] Cf. Brethr. 131; Ap. 163.

[87] Cf. Brethr. 168; Ap. 37, 91. A barber's son and follower of Anuruddha (but see Gotama the Man, 215). At the First Council he was chosen to recite Vinaya.

[88] Of Saaivatthii. Cf. infra, text 193; Brethr. 178; Ap. 499. He converted 500 women at one sermon. Cf. Majjh. iii, 270.

[89] Younger brother of Gotama. Ordained against his wish on the day of his marriage by the Master. Evidently a fop and strongly attached to worldly things, he is afterwards admonished at K.S. ii, 191. Cf. Brethr. 126; Ap. 57.

[90] Cf. Brethr. 254; Ap. 468. One of the twelve 'great disciples'; '(?) pale, thin, with a prominent nose' (K.S. ii, 194), he succeeded his father as raajah and renounced his realm to follow the Master. See Sakya, or Buddhist Origins, p. 140.

[91] Cf. Ap. 83, tejo-dhaatuusu kovido. No verses of Thag. are assigned to him. At one time he was personal attendant of the Master. Cf. Brethr. 350; UdA. 217. For the concentration on tejo-dhaatuu Cf. VM. 171, 363.

[92] Cf. Brethr. 115; S. iii, 79 (K.S. iii, 66; iv, 25); Ap. 484. Similar eminence is ascribed to Vangiisa above.

[93] Cf. Brethr. 151. Born a braahmin, he became an ascetic and made robes of rags roughly cut, sewn and dyed. Cf. Ap. 87, 486.


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