Anguttara Nikaya


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A'nguttara-Nikaaya
II. Dukanipaata

The Book of the
Gradual Sayings
or
More-Numbered Suttas

Part II
The Book of the Twos

Suttas 51-62
On persons

Translated from the Pali by
F.L. Woodward, M.A.

Copyright The Pali Text Society
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Sutta 51

[51.1] Monks, these two persons born into the world
are born to the profit and happiness of many,
to the profit, happiness and welfare of many folk.

What two?

A Tathaagata,
an Arahant who is a Fully Enlightened One,
and a world-ruling monarch.

These are the two so born.

 

§

 

Sutta 52

[52.1] Monks, these two persons born into the world
are horn as extraordinary men.

What two?

A Tathaagata,
an Arahant who is a Fully Enlightened One,
and a world-ruling monarch.

These are the two so born.

 

§

 

Sutta 53

[53.1] Monks, the death of two persons is regretted by many folk.

Of what two?

A Tathaagata,
an Arahant who is a Fully Enlightened One,
and a world-ruling monarch.

These are the two so born.

 

§

 

Sutta 54

[54.1] Monks, these two are worthy of a relic-shrine.[115]

What two?

A Tathaagata,
an Arahant who is a Fully Enlightened One,
and a world-ruling monarch.

 

§

 

Sutta 55

[55.1] Monks, these two are enlightened.

What two?

A Tathaagata, an Arahant who is a Fully Enlighteoed One,
and one enlightened for himself.[116]

 

§

 

Sutta 56

[56.1] Monks, these two tremble not at a thunder-clap.

What two?

A monk who has destroyed the aasavas,
and an elephant of noble breed.

These are the two that tremble not at a thunderclap.

 

§

 

Sutta 57

[57.1] Monks, these two tremble not at a thunder-clap.

What two?

A monk who has destroyed the aasavas,
and a thoroughbred steed.

These are the two that tremble not at a thunderclap.

 

§

 

Sutta 58

[58.1] Monks, these two tremble not at a thunder-clap.

What two?

A monk who has destroyed the aasavas,
and the lion, king of beasts.

These are the two that tremble not at a thunderclap.

 

§

 

Sutta 59

[59.1] Monks, seeing two reasons for not doing so,
those who are non-human[117]
do not utter speech as men.

What two reasons?

Thinking: Let us not tell lies
nor slander others with untruth.

These are the two reasons.

 

§

 

Sutta 60

[60.1] Monks, womenfolk end their life unsated and unreplete with two things.

What two?

Sexual intercourse and child-birth.

These are the two things.

 

§

 

Sutta 61

[61.1] 'Monks, I will teach you about the social intercourse of the unworthy and that of the worthy.

Do ye listen to it.

Apply your minds and I will speak.'

'Very good, lord,' replied those monks to the Exalted One.

The Exalted One said this:

'Now, monks, what is the social intercourse of the unworthy,
and how does the unworthy man associate with others?

In this connexion, suppose an elder monk to think thus:
Let no elder monk or one of middle standing or a novice speak to me,
and I for my part will not speak to him.

Even if an elder monk were to speak to me,
he would do so with intent to harm me,
not to profit me.

I would say "No" to him:[118]
I would vex him,[119]
and on seeing (that he was in the right) I would [73] not act accordingly:[120]
and so with regard to a monk of middle standing
and a novice.

Then a monk of middle standing thinks thus:

(As before. The same for a novice) ...

Such, monks, is the social intercourse of the unworthy,
and that is how the unworthy man associates with others.

Now what is the social intercourse of the worthy man,
and how does he associate with others?

Suppose an elder monk to think thus:
If an elder monk,
or one of middle standing
or a novice were to speak to me,
I would reply to him.

For if an elder monk were to speak to me
he would do so for my profit,
not for my loss.

I would say to him:
"It is well."
I should not vex him;
and on seeing (that he was in the right)
I should act accordingly.

And so with regard to a monk of middle standing and a novice.

Then a monk of middle standing thinks thus:

(As before. So for a novice) ...

Such, monks, is the social intercourse of the worthy,
and that is how the worthy man associates with others.

 

§

 

Sutta 62

[62.1] Monks, when in a dispute there is wordy warfare[121] on both sides,
with tenacity of view,[122]
malice of heart,
sulkiness and discontent,
one's personality is ruffied.

Therefore, monks,
it may be expected that this will conduce to protracted, bitter, contentious strife,[123]
and the monks will be unable to live at ease.

But when in a dispute there is wordy warfare on both sides
... if one's personality is unruffied,
then (the opposite may be expected).'

 


[115] Thuupa.

[116] Pacceka-Buddha. one equal to a Buddha in attainments, but not a world-teacher.

[117] Kimpurisaa (quisquis?). Comy. takes them to be the same as kinnaraa, birds with men's heads, but sometimes described as men with horses' or horned heads. At Manu, i, 39 they are described as demigods in the service of Kubera (Vessava.na), the lord of treasure and gnomes. But to show that such can speak, Comy. tells a tale of how a kinnara was brought to the Emperor Asoka, who at first could not make it speak, but it was induced to do so by a trick.

[118] Comy. 'I would not do as he asked.'

[119] Comy. 'By not following his advice.'

[120] Passam pi'ssa na pa.tikareyya'n. 'Even if I knew his advice to be right I would not follow it' (lit. 'imitate or satisfy him'). Comy.

[121] Vacii-sa'nsaara (word-circulation).

[122] Di.t.thi-palaaso. Cf. Pugg. 18, 19.

[123] Cf. supra, text 53.


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