Anguttara Nikaya


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A'nguttara-Nikaaya
III. Tika Nipaato
II. Rathakaara Vagga

The Book of the
Gradual Sayings
or
More-Numbered Suttas

Part III
The Book of the Threes

Chapter II. The Wheelwright

Sutta 12

Saara.niiya Sutta.m

Three Places

Translated from the Pali by
F.L. Woodward, M.A.

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[1][bodh][upal]Thus have I heard:

On a certain occasion the Exalted One was staying near Saavatthii, at Jeta Grove, in Anaathapi.n.dika's Park.

Then the Exalted One addressed the monks, saying:

'Monks.'

'Yes, lord,' replied those monks to the Exalted One.

The Exalted One said this:

'Monks, these three things must be borne in mind,
so long as he lives,
by a rajah,
a duly anointed ruler.

What three?

The first is the place where the rajah,
the duly anointed ruler,
was born.

Then again, monks, the second thing he must bear in mind,
so long as he lives,
is the place where he was anointed.[1]

Then again, monks, the third thing he must bear in mind,
so long as he lives,
is the place where he won a battle,
the place which he occupies as conqueror in the fight.[2]

These are the three things which must be borne in mind,
so long as he lives,
by a rajah,
a duly anointed ruler.

In like manner, monks,
these three things
must be borne in mind by a monk,
so long as he lives.

What three?

The place where he got his hair and beard shaved off,
donned the saffron robes
and went forth a wanderer
from home to the homeless life.

That is the first thing he must bear in mind,
so long as he lives.

Then again, monks,
the second thing he must bear in mind by a monk,
so long as he lives
is the place where he realized,
as it really is,
the meaning of:

"This is Ill.

This is the arising of Ill.

This is the ceasing of Ill.

This is the practice that leads to the ending of Ill.'"

Then again, monks, the third thing
he must bear in mind,
so long as he lives,
is the place where,
by the destruction of the aasavas,
he himself in this very life
came to know thoroughly
the heart's release and release by insight,
that is without aasavas,
and having attained it
abides therein.

These three things, monks,
must be borne in mind by a monk,
so long as he lives.'

 


[1] Here text misprints padesu and omits aavasitto.

[2] Sangaama-siisa.m ajjhaavasati = tam eva sangaama-.t.thaana.m abhibhavitvaa aavasati. Comy.


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