Anguttara Nikaya


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A'nguttaranikaayo
Catukkanipaato
X: Asura Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
The Book of the Fours Chapter X: Asuras

Sutta 97

U-N-A-B-R-I-D-G-E-D

Khippanisanti Sutta.m

Profit of Self (b)

Translated from the Pali by F. L. Woodward, M.A.

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[1] Monks, these four persons are found existing in the world.

What four?

He who is bent, on his own profit,
not another's;
he who is bent on another's profit,
not his own;
he who is bent on the profit of neither;
he who is bent on the profit of both.|| ||

'And how, monks, is a person bent on the profit of self,
not of another?

Herein, monks, a certain person is quick to observe[1]
in teachings that are profitable,
has naturally a good memory
for teachings he has heard,
examines the meaning of teachings he has learned by heart,
and by understanding both the meaning and the letter thereof,
walks in accordance with Dhamma.

Yet is he not possessed of a charming voice or delivery,
not possessed of urbane speech,
distinctly and clearly enunciated,
so as to make his meaning clear.[2]

Nor is he one to teach,
urge,
incite
and gladden his fellows in the holy life.

Thus, monks, a person is bent on the profit of self,
not of another.|| ||

And how, monks, is a person bent on the profit of another,
not of self?

Herein, monks, a certain person is not quick to observe
in teachings that are profitable,
does not have a naturally a good memory
for teachings he has heard,
does not examine the meaning of teachings he has learned by heart,
and not understanding both the meaning and the letter thereof,
does not walk in accordance with Dhamma.

Yet is he possessed of a charming voice or delivery,
he is possessed of urbane speech,
distinctly and clearly enunciated,
so as to make his meaning clear,
and he is one to teach,
urge,
incite
and gladden his fellows in the holy life.

Thus a person is bent on the profit of another,
not of self

And how, monks, is a person bent on neither his own nor another's profit?

Herein, monks, a certain person is not quick to observe
in teachings that are profitable,
does not have a naturally a good memory
for teachings he has heard,
does not examine the meaning of teachings he has learned by heart,
and not understanding both the meaning and the letter thereof,
does not walk in accordance with Dhamma.

And he is not possessed of a charming voice or delivery,
not possessed of urbane speech,
distinctly and clearly enunciated,
so as to make his meaning clear,
nor is he one to teach,
urge,
incite
and gladden his fellows in the holy life.

Thus a person is bent on neither his own nor another's profit.

And how, monks, is a person bent on the profit both of self and of another?

Herein, monks, a certain person is quick to observe
in teachings that are profitable,
has naturally a good memory
for teachings he has heard,
examines the meaning of teachings he has learned by heart,
and by understanding both the meaning and the letter thereof,
walks in accordance with Dhamma.

And he is possessed of a charming voice or delivery,
and is possessed of urbane speech,
distinctly and clearly enunciated,
so as to make his meaning clear
and he is one to teach,
urge,
incite
and gladden his fellows in the holy life.

Thus a person is bent on the profit both of self and of another

So these, monks, are the four persons found existing in the world.'

 


[1] Khippa-nisanti. Cf. A. iii, 201, iv, 296, siigha.m jaanitu.m samattho. Comy.

[2] S. i, 240, ii, 280; Ud. 59; supra, text 51.


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