Anguttara Nikaya


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The Pali is transliterated as Velthuis (aaiiuu.m'n~n.t.d.n.l). Alternatives:
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Anguttara Nikaaya
Atthaka Nipaata
Chapter VII: On Earthquakes

Sutta 61

U-N-A-B-R-I-D-G-E-D

Hankering

Translated from the Pali by E.M. Hare.

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[1] THUS have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was dwelling near Saavatthii,
at Jeta Grove,
in Anaathapi.n.dika's Park.

There the Exalted One addressed the monks, saying:

'Monks.'

'Yes, lord,' they replied, and the Exalted One said:

2. 'Monks, these eight persons are found in the world.

What eight?

3. Monks, take the case of a monk, in whom,
while living in seclusion
not stirred to effort,[1]
there arises a hankering after possessions.[2]

He rouses himself,
exerts himself
and strives for possessions;
but, though he rouse himself,
exert himself
and strive,
possessions come not to him.

From not getting possessions,
he mourns,
grieves,
wails,
beats his breast
and falls into distraction.[3]

Monks, this monk is called:

"One who lives hankering after possessions" -
he rouses himself,
exerts himself
and strives for possessions,
but not getting them he becomes a mourner,
a wailer;
he has fallen from Saddhamma.[4]

 


 

[195] 4. Take the case, monks, of a monk, in whom,
while living in seclusion
not stirred to effort,
there arises a hankering after possessions.

He rouses himself,
exerts himself
and strives for possessions;
and rousing himself
exerting himself
and striving for possessions; possessions come to him.

From getting possessions,
he becomes elated,
excited,
he falls into a state of elation,
excitement.

Monks, this monk is called:

"One who lives hankering after possessions" -
he rouses himself,
exerts himself
and strives for possessions,
and from getting them
he becomes elated,
excited;
and falls into a state of elation,
excitement;
he has fallen from Saddhamma.

 


 

5. Take the case, monks, of a monk in whom,
while living in seclusion
not stirred to effort,
there arises a hankering after possessions.

He does not rouse himself,
nor exert himself,
nor strive for possessions;
and not rousing himself,
nor exerting himself,
nor striving for possessions;
they come not to him.

Not getting possessions,
he mourns,
grieves,
wails,
beats his breast
and falls into distraction.

Monks, this monk is called:

"One who lives hankering after possessions " - ,
he does not rouse himself,
nor exert himself,
nor strive for possessions;
and not getting them,
he mourns,
grieves,
wails,
beats his breast
and falls into distraction;
he has fallen from Saddhamma.

 


 

6. Take the case, monks, of a monk in whom,
while living in seclusion
not stirred to effort,
there arises a hankering after possessions.

He does not rouse himself,
nor exert himself,
nor strive for possessions;
and not rousing himself,
nor exerting himself,
nor striving for possessions;
possessions come to him.

From getting possessions,
he becomes elated,
excited,
he falls into a state of elation,
excitement.

Monks, this monk is called:

"One who lives hankering after possessions " - ,
he does not rouse himself,
nor exert himself,
nor strive for possessions;
and getting them
he becomes elated,
excited,
he falls into a state of elation,
excitement;
he has fallen from Saddhamma.

 


 

7. Take the case, monks, of a monk, in whom,
while living in seclusion
not stirred to effort,
there arises a hankering after possessions.

He rouses himself,
exerts himself
and strives for possessions;
but, though he rouse himself,
exert himself
and strive,
possessions come not to him.

From not getting possessions,
he does not mourn,
does not grieve,
does not wail,
does not beat his breast
and does not fall into distraction.

Monks, this monk is called:

"One who lives hankering after possessions" -
he rouses himself,
exerts himself
and strives for possessions,
but not getting them he does not become a mourner,
a wailer;
he has not fallen from Saddhamma.

 


 

8. Take the case, monks, of a monk, in whom,
while living in seclusion
not stirred to effort,
there arises a hankering after possessions.

He rouses himself,
exerts himself
and strives for possessions;
and rousing himself
exerting himself
and striving for possessions; possessions come to him.

From getting possessions,
he does not becomes elated,
excited,
he does not fall into a state of elation,
excitement.

Monks, this monk is called:

"One who lives hankering after possessions" -
he rouses himself,
exerts himself
and strives for possessions,
and from getting them
he does not become elated,
excited;
and does not fall into a state of elation,
excitement;
he has not fallen from Saddhamma.

 


 

Take the case, monks, of a monk in whom,
while living in seclusion
not stirred to effort,
there arises a hankering after possessions.

He does not rouse himself,
nor exert himself,
nor strive for possessions;
and not rousing himself,
nor exerting himself,
nor striving for possessions;
they come not to him.

Not getting possessions,
he does not mourn,
grieve,
wail,
or beat his breast
and does not fall into distraction.

Monks, [196] this monk is called:

"One who lives hankering after possessions " - ,
he does not rouse himself,
nor exert himself,
nor strive for possessions;
and not getting them,
he does not mourn,
grieve,
wail,
or beat his breast
and does not fall into distraction;
he has not fallen from Saddhamma.

 


 

Take the case, monks, of a monk in whom,
while living in seclusion
not stirred to effort,
there arises a hankering after possessions.

He does not rouse himself,
nor exert himself,
nor strive for possessions;
and not rousing himself,
nor exerting himself,
nor striving for possessions;
possessions come to him.

From getting possessions,
he does not become elated,
excited,
he does not fall into a state of elation,
excitement.

Monks, this monk is called:

"One who lives hankering after possessions " - ,
he does not rouse himself,
nor exert himself,
nor strive for possessions;
and getting them
he does not become elated,
excited,
he does not fall into a state of elation,
excitement;
he has not fallen from Saddhamma.

Monks, these eight persons are found in this world.'

 


[1] Niraayattavutti. Comy. anaayatta-.

[2] Laabha. Comy. the four requisites.

[3] Cf. M. i, 86; also A. ii, 188; iii, 416; on sammoha see DhS. trsl., Ii 390.

[4] Comy. vipassanaa, inward vision.


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