Anguttara Nikaya


[Site Map]  [Home]  [Sutta Indexes]  [Glossology]  [Site Sub-Sections]

The Pali is transliterated as Velthuis (aaiiuu.m'n~n.t.d.n.l). Alternatives:
[ ASCII (aiumnntdnl) | IAST Unicode (āīūṃṅñṭḍṇḷ) ]

 

A'nguttara Nikaaya
X. Dasaka-Nipaata
II. Naatha Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
X. The Book of the Tens
II: Things Making for Warding

Sutta 12

Pa~nca'nga Sutta.m

Factors

Translated from the Pali by F. L. Woodward, M.A.

Copyright The Pali Text Society
Commercial Rights Reserved
Creative Commons Licence
For details see Terms of Use.

 


[16] [12]

[1][bodh] Thus have I heard:

On a certain occasion the Exalted One was staying near Saavatthii.

There the Exalted One addressed the monks, saying:

'Monks.'

'Yes, lord,' they replied, and the Exalted One said:

'Monks, a monk who has given up five factors and is complete in five factors is called in this dhamma-discipline:

"Allproficient,[1] one who has lived the life, the best of men."

And how is a monk one who has given up five factors?

Herein a monk's sensual desire is given up, malevolence, sloth-and-torpor, worry-and-flurry, doubt-and-wavering are given up.

Thus is he one who has given up five factors.

And how is he complete in five factors?

Herein a monk is complete in the sum total of a master's virtues, of a master's concentration,[2] in the sum total of a master's insight, release, the release by knowing and seeing. Thus is he complete in five factors.

Monks, a monk who has given up five and is complete in five factors is called in this dhamma-di scipline:

"All-proficient, one who has lived the life, the best of men."

Not sensual desire, malevolence,
Nor sloth-and-torpor, worry-and-flurry at all,
Not doubt-and-wavering in a monk are seen.
[13] Blest with a master's virtues, concentration,
Release and knowledge which belong to it, -
He surely, with five factors all complete,
Abandoning five factors, is thus called
"One all-proficient in this dhamma-discipline."[3]

 


[1] Kevalii; cf. Itiv. Ii 97, 'One lovely in virtue, nature and insight' (an 'all-rounder') is so called. Comy. kemlehi gu.nehi samannaagato; cf. V.M. i, 146: KhA.. 115 (on kevala-kappa) = SA. i, 15, which quotes our passage, reading kevala.m. The word is also used for nibbaana.; in Sankhya and Yoga works it means the complete absorption in the thought of the universal unity (kaivalya), or the complete isolation of the purusha after death of the body.

[2] Samaadhi-kkhandha; cf. G.S. ii, 51.

[3] Partly at Thag. v. 74 and v. 1010; Thig. v. 165.


Contact:
E-mail
Copyright Statement