Majjhima Nikaya


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Majjhima Nikaaya
III. Upari Pa.n.naasa
5. Sa.laayatana Vagga

The Middle Length Sayings
III. The Final Fifty Discourses
5. The Division of the Sixfold Sense(-field)

Sutta 145

Pu.n.n'ovaada Sutta.m

Discourse on an Exhortation to Pu.n.na

Translated from the Pali by I.B. Horner, M.A.
Associate of Newham College, Cambridge
First Published in 1954

Copyright The Pali Text Society
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[1][chlm][upal] Thus have I heard:

At one time[1] the Lord was once staying near Saavatthii,
in the Jeta Grove,
in Anaathapi.n.dika's, monastery.

Then the venerable Pu.n.na,[2]
emerging from solitary meditation towards evening,
approached the Lord;
having approached and greeted the Lord,
he sat down at a respectful distance.

As he was sitting down at a respectful distance,
the venerable Pu.n.na spoke thus to the Lord:

"It would be good, revered sir,
if the Lord would exhort me
with an exhortation in brief
so that I,
having heard dhamma from the Lord,
might abide alone,
aloof,
diligent,
ardent,
self-resolute."

"Well then, Pu.n.na, listen,
attend carefully
and I will speak."

"Yes, revered sir,"
the venerable Pu.n.na answered the Lord in assent.

The Lord spoke thus:

"There are, Pu.n.na,
material shapes cognisable by the eye,
agreeable,
pleasant,
liked,
enticing,
connected with sensual pleasures,
alluring.

If a monk delights in these,[3]
welcomes them
and persists in cleaving to them,
then, because he delights in them,
welcomes them
and persists in cleaving to them,
delight uprises in him.

I say, [320] Pu.n.na,
that from the uprising of delight
is the uprising of anguish.

"There are, Pu.n.na,
sounds cognisable by the ear,
agreeable,
pleasant,
liked,
enticing,
connected with sensual pleasures,
alluring.

If a monk delights in these,
welcomes them
and persists in cleaving to them,
then, because he delights in them,
welcomes them
and persists in cleaving to them,
delight uprises in him.

I say, Pu.n.na,
that from the uprising of delight
is the uprising of anguish.

"There are, Pu.n.na,
smells cognisable by the nose,
agreeable,
pleasant,
liked,
enticing,
connected with sensual pleasures,
alluring.

If a monk delights in these,
welcomes them
and persists in cleaving to them,
then, because he delights in them,
welcomes them
and persists in cleaving to them,
delight uprises in him.

I say, Pu.n.na,
that from the uprising of delight
is the uprising of anguish.

"There are, Pu.n.na,
tastes cognisable by the tongue,
agreeable,
pleasant,
liked,
enticing,
connected with sensual pleasures,
alluring.

If a monk delights in these,
welcomes them
and persists in cleaving to them,
then, because he delights in them,
welcomes them
and persists in cleaving to them,
delight uprises in him.

I say, Pu.n.na,
that from the uprising of delight
is the uprising of anguish.

"There are, Pu.n.na,
touches cognisable by the body,
agreeable,
pleasant,
liked,
enticing,
connected with sensual pleasures,
alluring.

If a monk delights in these,
welcomes them
and persists in cleaving to them,
then, because he delights in them,
welcomes them
and persists in cleaving to them,
delight uprises in him.

I say, Pu.n.na,
that from the uprising of delight
is the uprising of anguish.

"There are, Pu.n.na,
mental states cognisable by the mind,
agreeable,
pleasant,
liked,
enticing,
connected with sensual pleasures,
alluring.

If a monk delights in these,
welcomes them
and persists in cleaving to them,
then, because he delights in them,
welcomes them
and persists in cleaving to them,
delight uprises in him.

I say, Pu.n.na,
that from the uprising of delight
is the uprising of anguish.

 


 

"There are, Pu.n.na,
material shapes cognisable by the eye,
agreeable,
pleasant,
liked,
enticing,
connected with sensual pleasures,
alluring.

If a monk does not delight in these,
does not welcome them
or persists in cleaving to them,
then, because he does not delight in them,
welcomes them
or persists in cleaving to them,
delight is stopped in him.

I say, Pu.n.na,
that from the stopping of delight
is the stopping of anguish.

"There are, Pu.n.na,
sounds cognisable by the ear,
agreeable,
pleasant,
liked,
enticing,
connected with sensual pleasures,
alluring.

If a monk does not delight in these,
does not welcome them
or persists in cleaving to them,
then, because he does not delight in them,
welcomes them
or persists in cleaving to them,
delight is stopped in him.

I say, Pu.n.na,
that from the stopping of delight
is the stopping of anguish.

"There are, Pu.n.na,
smells cognisable by the nose,
agreeable,
pleasant,
liked,
enticing,
connected with sensual pleasures,
alluring.

If a monk does not delight in these,
does not welcome them
or persists in cleaving to them,
then, because he does not delight in them,
welcomes them
or persists in cleaving to them,
delight is stopped in him.

I say, Pu.n.na,
that from the stopping of delight
is the stopping of anguish.

"There are, Pu.n.na,
tastes cognisable by the tongue,
agreeable,
pleasant,
liked,
enticing,
connected with sensual pleasures,
alluring.

If a monk does not delight in these,
does not welcome them
or persists in cleaving to them,
then, because he does not delight in them,
welcomes them
or persists in cleaving to them,
delight is stopped in him.

I say, Pu.n.na,
that from the stopping of delight
is the stopping of anguish.

"There are, Pu.n.na,
touches cognisable by the body,
agreeable,
pleasant,
liked,
enticing,
connected with sensual pleasures,
alluring.

If a monk does not delight in these,
does not welcome them
or persists in cleaving to them,
then, because he does not delight in them,
welcomes them
or persists in cleaving to them,
delight is stopped in him.

I say, Pu.n.na,
that from the stopping of delight
is the stopping of anguish.

"There are, Pu.n.na,
mental states cognisable by the mind,
agreeable,
pleasant,
liked,
enticing,
connected with sensual pleasures,
alluring.

If a monk does not delight in these,
does not welcome them
or persists in cleaving to them,
then, because he does not delight in them,
welcomes them
or persists in cleaving to them,
delight is stopped in him.

I say, Pu.n.na,
that from the stopping of delight
is the stopping of anguish.

 


 

And in what district will you stay, Pu.n.na,
now that you have been exhorted by me
with this exhortation in brief?"

"There is a district called Sunaaparanta.[4]

I will stay there, revered sir,
now that I have been exhorted by the Lord
with this exhortation in brief."

"Pu.n.na, the people of Sunaaparanta are fierce,
the people of Sunaaparanta are rough.

If the people of Sunaaparanta
revile[5] and abuse you, Pu.n.na,
how will it be for you there, Pu.n.na?"

"If the people of Sunaaparanta
revile and abuse me, revered sir,
it will be thus for me there:

I will say,

'Goodly indeed are these people of Sunaaparanta,
indeed very goodly are these people of Sunaaparanta
in that they do not strike me a blow with their hands.'

It will be thus for me here, Lord,
it will be thus for me here, Well-farer."

"But if the people of Sunaaparnata
do strike you a blow with their hands, Pu.n.na,
how will it be for you there, Pu.n.na?"

"If the people of Sunaaparanta
strike me a blow with their hands, revered sir,
it will be thus for me there:

I will say,

'Goodly indeed are these people of Sunaaparanta,
indeed very goodly are these people [321] of Sunaaparanta
in that they do not strike me a blow with clods of earth.'

It will be thus for me here, Lord,
it will be thus for me here, Well-farer."

"But if the people of Sunaaparanta
do strike you a blow with clods of earth, Pu.n.na,
how will it be for you there, Pu.n.na?"

"If the people of Sunaaparanta
strike me a blow with clods of earth, revered sir,
it will be thus for me there:

I will say,

'Goodly indeed are these people of Sunaaparanta,
indeed very goodly are these people of Sunaaparanta
in that they do not strike me a blow with a stick.'[6]

It will be thus for me here, Lord,
it will be thus for me here, Well-farer."

"But if the people of Sunaaparanta
do strike you a blow with a stick, Pu.n.na,
how will it be for you there, Pu.n.na?"

"If the people of Sunaaparanta
strike me a blow with a stick, revered sir,
it will be thus for me there:

I will say,

'Goodly indeed are these people of Sunaaparanta,
indeed very goodly are these people of Sunaaparanta
in that they do not strike me a blow with a knife.'

It will be thus for me here, Lord,
it will be thus for me here, Well-farer."

"But if the people of Sunaaparanta
do strike you a blow with a knife, Pu.n.na,
how will it be for you there, Pu.n.na?"

"If the people of Sunaaparanta
strike me a blow with a knife, revered sir,
it will be thus for me there:

I will say,

'Goodly indeed are these people of Sunaaparanta,
indeed very goodly are these people of Sunaaparanta
in that they do not deprive me of life
with a sharp knife.'

It will be thus for me here, Lord,
it will be thus for me here, Well-farer."

"But if the people of Sunaaparanta
do deprive you of life
with a sharp knife, Pu.n.na,
how will it be for you there, Pu.n.na?"

"If the people of Sunaaparanta
deprive me of life
with a sharp knife, revered sir,
it will be thus for me there:

I will say,

'There are disciples of the Lord
who, disgusted by the body
and the life-principle
and ashamed of them,
look about for a knife
(with which to kill themselves).[7]
I have come upon this very knife
without having looked about for it.'

It will be thus for me here, Lord,
it will be thus for me here, Well-farer."

"It is good, Pu.n.na,
it is good.

You will be able to live in the district
among the people of Sunaaparanta
possessed as you are
of this taming and calm.[8]

You, Punna, now do that
for which you deem the time is right."

Then the venerable Pu.n.na,
having rejoiced in what the Lord had said
and having given thanks for it,
rose from his seat
and greeted the Lord
keeping his right side towards him,
packed away his lodging
and, taking his bowl and robe,
set out on tour for the Sunaaparanta district.

Walking on tour,
he gradually arrived at the Sunaaparanta district.

While he was there
the venerable Pun.na stayed in the district among the people of Sunaaparanta.

And [322] during the same rainy season
the venerable Pu.n.na established as many as five hundred lay-devotees,
as many as five hundred female lay-devotees,
and he realised the three knowledges.

Then after a time
the venerable Pu.n.na attained final nibbaana.[9]

A number of monks approached the Lord;
having approached and greeted the Lord,
they sat down at a respectful distance.

As they were sitting down at a respectful distance,
these monks spoke thus to the Lord:

"Revered sir, that young man of family[10] named Pu.n.na
who was exhorted by the Lord with an exhortation in brief,
has died.

What is his bourn,
what his future state?"

"Clever, monks, was Pu.n.na
the young man of family;
he followed after dhamma
according to the various parts of dhamma;
and he did not annoy me
with questionings about dhamma.

Pu.n.na the young man of family
has gained final nibbaana, monks."

Thus spoke the Lord.

Delighted, these monks rejoiced in what the Lord had said.

Discourse on an Exhortation to Pu.n.na:
The Third

 


[1] As at S. iv. 60 ff., Divy. 37-39.

[2] Verses at Thag. 70. See ThagA. i. 167-169 and MA. v. 85-92.

[3] That is, in both the eye and material shapes.

[4] MA. v. 85 says he was a dweller in Sunaaparanta, and there were four places there where he stayed. Two, however, were not suitable: the monastery in Samuddagiri was surrounded by magnetic rocks so it was impossible to pace up and down; and at Maatulagiri a huge flock of birds made a noise day and night.

[5] Or, "curse." See B.D. ii. 171, n. 3, also p. 269; also B.D. iii. 344 (Vin. iv. 309) where "revile" and "abuse" are defined much as they are at MA. v. 85.

[6] MA. v. 85 says a four-handed stick or a club of twigs.

[7] satthahaaraka, or an assassin. But see Paaraajika III (Vin. iii. 73) to which MA. v. 85 refers.

[8] damupasama. MA. v. 86 says that in this Sta. dama is khanti, forbearance or patience, and upasmma has the same meaning.

[9] MA. v. 92 says he attained final nibbaana in the element of nibbaana that has no substrate for rebirth remaining. The people reverenced his body for a week and then, having collected sweet scented sticks, they cremated it, took away the remains and built a cetiya.

[10] I do not know why Punn.N is here referred to as kulapvltu. It is perhaps to show he died young.

 


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