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The Pali is transliterated as Velthuis (aaiiuu.m'n~n.t.d.n.l). Alternatives:
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- UNABBREVIATED -

Sa'nyutta Nikaaya
I. Sagaatha Vagga
5. Bhikkhunii Sa'nyutta

The Book of the Kindred Sayings
I. Kindred Sayings with Verses
5. Suttas of the Sisters[1]

Translated by Mrs. Rhys Davids
Assisted by Suuriyago.da Sumangala Thera
Public Domain

 


 

Sutta 1

The Aa.lavite[2]

 


 

[1.1][ati][bps] THUS HAVE I HEARD:

The Exalted One was once staying near Saavatthii, at Jeta Grove, in Anaathapi.n.dika's Park.

2. Now the Alavite sister dressed herself early and, taking bowl and robe, entered Saavatthii for alms.

And when she had gone about Saavatthii for it, and was returning after her meal, she entered Dark Wood seeking solitude.[3]

Then Maara the evil one, desirous to arouse fear, wavering, and dread in her, desirous of making her desist from[4] being alone, went up to her, and addressed her in verse: -

Ne'er shalt thou find escape while in the world!
What profiteth thee then thy loneliness?
Take thou thy fill of sense-desires and love.
Be not a woman who repents too late.

Then the Aalavite thought:

'Who now is this, human or non-human, that speaketh verse?

Sure 't is Maara the evil one speaketh verse, desirous of arousing in me fear, wavering, and dread, desirous of making me desist from being alone.'

And the Sister, knowing it was Maara, replied with verses: -

There is escape[5] while in the world, and well
By insight[6] have I found and made it mine.
Thou kin to all the careless,[7] evil one!
Not thine is it to know the Way, the Goal.[8]
Like spears and javelins are desires of sense,
That pierce and rend the mortal frames of us.
This that thou callest sense-desire and love:
For me a thing detested hath become.

Then Maara thought:

'The Alavite Sister knows me!'
and sad and sorrowful he vanished there and then.

 


 

Sutta 2

Somaa

 


 

[2.1][ati][bps][ati-olen] THUS HAVE I HEARD:

The Exalted One was once staying near Saavatthii, at Jeta Grove, in Anaathapi.n.dika's Park.

2. Now sister Somaa dressed herself early and, taking bowl and robe, entered Saavatthii for alms.

And when she had gone about Saavatthii for it, when she was returning from her alms-round, after her meal, entered Dark Wood for noonday-rest,[9] and plunging into its depths sat down under a certain tree.

Then Maara the evil one, desirous of arousing fear, wavering, and dread in her, desirous of making her desist from concentrated thought, went up to her and addressed her in verse: -

That vantage-ground[10] the sages may attain
Is hard to win. With her two-finger wit[11]
That may no woman ever hope to achieve.

Then Soma thought:

'Who now is this, human or non-human, that speaketh verse?

Sure 't is Maara" the evil one speaketh verse, desirous of arousing in me fear, wavering, and dread, desirous of making me desist from being alone.

And the Sister, knowing it was Maara,' replied in verses: -

What should the woman's nature signify
When consciousness is tense and firmly set,
When knowledge rolleth ever on,[12] when she
By insight rightly comprehends the Norm?

To one for whom the question doth arise:
Am I a woman [in these matters], or
Am I a man, or what not am I then?[13]
To such an one is Maara fit to talk.

Then Maara the evil one thought:

'Sister Somaa knows me!' and sad and sorrowful he vanished there and then.

 


 

Sutta 3

Gotamii

 


 

[3.1][ati][bps] THUS HAVE I HEARD:

The Exalted One was once staying near Saavatthii, at Jeta Grove, in Anaathapi.n.dika's Park.

2. Now sister Lean Gotamii[14][15] dressed herself early and, taking bowl and robe, entered Saavatthii for alms.

And when she had gone about Saavatthii for it, when she was returning from her alms-round, after her meal, entered Dark Wood for noonday-rest, and plunging into its depths sat down under a certain tree.

Then Maara the evil one, desirous of arousing fear, wavering, and dread in her, desirous of making her desist from concentrated thought, went up to her and addressed her in verse: -

How now? Dost sit alone with tearful face,
As mother stricken by the loss of child?
Thou who hast plunged into the woods alone,
Is it a man that thou hast come to seek?

Then Sister Gotamii thought:

'Who now is this, human or non-human, that speaketh verse?

'Sure't is Maara the evil one speaketh verse, desirous of arousing in me fear, wavering, and dread, desirous of making me desist from being alone.

And the Sister, knowing it was Maara,' replied in verses: -

Past are the days when I was she whose child
Was lost! Men to that past belong - for me![16]
I do not grieve, I am not shedding tears.
And as for thee, good sir, I fear thee not.
Lost on all sides is love of worldly joys.
The gloom of ignorance is rent in twain.
Defeating all the myrmidons of death,
Here do I bide [to rest,] sane and immune.

Then Maara the evil one thought:

'Sister Gotamii knows me!'
and sad and sorrowful he vanished there and then.

 


 

Sutta 4

Vijayaa[17]

 


 

[3.1][ati][bps] THUS HAVE I HEARD:

The Exalted One was once staying near Saavatthii, at Jeta Grove, in Anaathapi.n.dika's Park.

2. Now sister Vijayaadressed herself early and, taking bowl and robe, entered Saavatthii for alms.

And when she had gone about Saavatthii for it, when she was returning from her alms-round, after her meal, entered Dark Wood for noonday-rest, and plunging into its depths sat down under a certain tree.

Then Maara the evil one, desirous of arousing fear, wavering, and dread in her, desirous of making her desist from concentrated thought, went up to her and addressed her in verse: -

A maiden thou and beautiful - and I
So young a lad! Now where to fivefold art
Of sounds melodious[18] we may list, 0 come,
Lady, and let us take our fill of joy!

Then Sister Vijaya thought:

'Who now is this, human or non-human, that speaketh verse?

'Sure't is Maara the evil one speaketh verse, desirous of arousing in me fear, wavering, and dread, desirous of making me desist from being alone.

And the Sister, knowing it was Maara,' replied in verses: -

Sights, sounds and tastes and smells[19] and things to touch,
Wherein the mind delights, I leave them all
To thee, Maara; nought of that ilk I seek.
This body vile, this brittle, crumbling thing,
Doth touch me only with distress and shame.
Craving for joys of sense is rooted out.
How beings are reborn in other worlds
Material, how others dwell, again,
Where matter is not, and th' ecstatic states,
Good [of their kind to bring men to those worlds][20]
From all of these the darkness is dispelled.

Then Maara the evil one thought:

'Sister Vijayaa knows me!'
and sad and sorrowful he vanished there and then.

 


 

Sutta 5

Uppalava.n.naa[21]

 


 

[3.1][ati][bps] THUS HAVE I HEARD:

The Exalted One was once staying near Saavatthii, at Jeta Grove, in Anaathapi.n.dika's Park.

2. Now sister Uppalava.n.naa dressed herself early and, taking bowl and robe, entered Saavatthii for alms.

And when she had gone about Saavatthii for it, when she was returning from her alms-round, after her meal, entered Dark Wood for noonday-rest, and plunging into its depths stood at the foot of a sal-tree[22] in full blossom.

Then Maara the evil one, desirous of arousing fear, wavering, and dread in her, desirous of making her desist from concentrated thought, went up to her and addressed her in verse: -

Thou that art come where over thee, crowned with blossom [Waveth] the sal-tree, Sister, and standest there lonely, Beauty like thine none is there able to rival.[23] Fearest thou not, foolish girl, the wiles of seducers?

Then Sister Uppalavanna thought:

'Who now is this, human or non-human, that speaketh verse?

'Sure't is Maara the evil one speaketh verse, desirous of arousing in me fear, wavering, and dread, desirous of making me desist from being alone.

And the Sister, knowing it was Maara,' replied in verses: -

Were there an hundred thousand seducers as thou art,
Ne'er would I tremble affrighted nor turn a hair of me!
Maara, I fear not thee, lone tho' I stand here.
Lo! I can vanish, or enter into thy body.
Yea, I stand 'twixt eyebrows; thou canst not see me.

For consciousness is wholly self-controlled,
The Paths to Potency are throughly learnt.
Yea, I am free from all the bonds there be.
In sooth, good sir, I have no fear of thee.

Then Maara the evil one thought:

'Sister Uppalava.n.naa knows me!'
and sad and sorrowful he vanished there and then.

 


 

Sutta 6

Caalaa[24]

 


 

[6.1][ati][bps] THUS HAVE I HEARD:

The Exalted One was once staying near Saavatthii, at Jeta Grove, in Anaathapi.n.dika's Park.

2. Now sister Caalaa dressed herself early and, taking bowl and robe, entered Saavatthii for alms.

And when she had gone about Saavatthii for it, when she was returning from her alms-round, after her meal, entered Dark Wood for noonday-rest, and plunging into its depths sat down under a certain tree.

Then Maara the evil one, desirous of arousing fear, wavering, and dread in her, desirous of making her desist from concentrated thought, went up to her and said:

'Wherein, Sister, dost thou find no pleasure'[25]

'In [re]birth, friend,[26] I find no pleasure.'

'Why findest thou no pleasure in [re]birth?

Once born we enjoy the pleasures of the senses.

Who hath put this into thy mind, Sister[27]: -
"find no pleasure in rebirth?"'

[Caalaa: - ]

Once born we die. Once born we see life's ills -
The bonds, the torments and the life cut off.
The Buddha hath revealed the Norm to us -
How we may get beyond the power of birth,
How we may put an end to every ill.
He brought and stablished me upon the Truth[28]
They that are born in worlds material,
And they that dwell in immaterial heav'ns[29]: -
If they know not how they may end it all -
Are goers, all of them, again to birth.

Then Maara the evil one thought:

'Sister Caalaa knows me!'
and sad and sorrowful he vanished there and then.

 


 

Sutta 7

Upacaalaa

 


 

[7.1][ati][bps] THUS HAVE I HEARD:

The Exalted One was once staying near Saavatthii, at Jeta Grove, in Anaathapi.n.dika's Park.

2. Now sister Upacaalaa dressed herself early and, taking bowl and robe, entered Saavatthii for alms.

And when she had gone about Saavatthii for it, when she was returning from her alms-round, after her meal, entered Dark Wood for noonday-rest, and plunging into its depths sat down under a certain tree.

Then Maara the evil one, desirous of arousing fear, wavering, and dread in her, desirous of making her desist from concentrated thought, went up to her and said:

'Where, Sister, dost thou wish to rise again?'[30]

'Nowhere, friend, do I wish to rise again.'|| ||

[Maara: -]

Nay, are there not the Three and Thirty Gods,
And gods who govern in the realms of shades,[31]
They of the Blissful Heavens, they who rejoice
In fresh creations, they who hold control
Over what others have created[32]? Think,
And here or there set thon thy heart's desire.
The bliss of each in turn may then be thine.

[Upacaalaa:-]

[Ay, think upon] the Three and Thirty Gods,
And gods who govern in the realms of shades,
They of the Blissful Heav'ns, they who rejoice
In fresh creations, they who hold control
Over what others have created:-[Think!]
All they come evermore 'neath Maara's sway,
For all are bound by bonds of sense-desire.

On fire is all the world, and racked in flames.[33]
Ablaze is all the world, the heav'ns do quake.
But that which quaketh not, influctuate,
Untrodden by the average worldling's[34] feet,
Where Maara cometh not, nor hath way-gate -
There doth my heart abide in blest retreat.

Then Maara the evil one thought:

'Sister Upacaalaa knows me!'
and sad and sorrowful he vanished there and then.

 


 

Sutta 8

Siisupacaalaa

 


 

[8.1][ati][bps] THUS HAVE I HEARD:

The Exalted One was once staying near Saavatthii, at Jeta Grove, in Anaathapi.n.dika's Park.

2. Now sister Siisupacaalaa dressed herself early and, taking bowl and robe, entered Saavatthii for alms.

And when she had gone about Saavatthii for it, when she was returning from her alms-round, after her meal, entered Dark Wood for noonday-rest, and plunging into its depths sat down under a certain tree.

Then Maara the evil one, desirous of arousing fear, wavering, and dread in her, desirous of making her desist from concentrated thought, went up to her and said:

'Of whose shibboleth,[35] Sister, dost thou approve?

'Of no one's shibboleth, friend, do I approve.'

[Maara:-]

What? In whose name, then, didst thou shave
Thy head and like a nun art seen, if thou
No heretic and no shibboleth[36] dost approve?
What, futile and infatuate, is thy quest?

[Siisupacaalaa: -]

'Tis they that are without, who cast the nets
Of vain beliefs on which they pin their faith: -
Theirs are the doctrines I do not approve.
'Tis they that lack conversance with the Norm.

Lo! in the princely Saakya clan is born
A Buddha peerless 'mong the sons of men,
Who all hath overcome,[37] before whose face
Maara doth flee away, who everywhere
Unconquered stands, he that is wholly freed
And fetterless, the Seer who seeth all,
For whom all karma is destroyed, who in
The perishing of every germ that birth
Once more engenders, is at liberty!
This is the Exalted One, my Master he,
And his the system whereof I approve.

Then Maara the evil one thought:

'Sister Siisupacaalaa knows me!'
and sad and sorrowful he vanished there and then.

 


 

Sutta 9

Selaa

 


 

[9.1][ati][bps] THUS HAVE I HEARD:

The Exalted One was once staying near Saavatthii, at Jeta Grove, in Anaathapi.n.dika's Park.

2. Now sister Selaa dressed herself early and, taking bowl and robe, entered Saavatthii for alms.

And when she had gone about Saavatthii for it, when she was returning from her alms-round, after her meal, entered Dark Wood for noonday-rest, and plunging into its depths sat down under a certain tree.

Then Maara the evil one, desirous of arousing fear, wavering, and dread in her, desirous of making her desist from concentrated thought, went up to her and addressed her in verse: -

Who was't that made the human puppet['s form]?[38]
Where is the maker of the human doll?[38]
Whence, tell me, hath the puppet come to be?
Where will the puppet cease and pass away?

[Selaa: -]

Neither self-made the puppet is, nor yet
By other wrought is this ill-plighted thing.[39]
By reason of a cause[40] it came to be,
By rupture of a cause it dies away.
Like to a certain seed sown in the field,
Which, when it lighteth on the taste of earth
And moisture likewise, by these twain doth grow,
So the five aggregates, the elements,
And the six spheres of sense - even all these -
By reason of a cause they came to be;
By rupture of a cause they die away.

Then Maara the evil one thought:

'Sister Selaa knows me!'
and sad and sorrowful he vanished there and then.

 


 

Sutta 10

Vajiraa

 


 

[10.1][ati][bps] THUS HAVE I HEARD:

The Exalted One was once staying near Saavatthii, at Jeta Grove, in Anaathapi.n.dika's Park.

2. Now sister Vajiraa dressed herself early and, taking bowl and robe, entered Saavatthii for alms.

And when she had gone about Saavatthii for it, when she was returning from her alms-round, after her meal, entered Dark Wood for noonday-rest, and plunging into its depths sat down under a certain tree.

Then Maara the evil one, desirous of arousing fear, wavering, and dread in her, desirous of making her desist from concentrated thought, went up to her and addressed her in verse: -

By whom was wrought this 'being'? Where is he
Who makes him? Whence doth a being rise?
Where doth the being cease and pass away?[41]

Then Sister Vajiraa thought:

'Who now is this, human or non-human, that speaketh verse?

'Sure't is Maara the evil one speaketh verse, desirous of arousing in me fear, wavering, and dread, desirous of making me desist from being alone.

And the Sister, knowing it was Maara,' replied in verses: -

'Being'! Why dost thou harp upon[42] that word?
'Mong false opinions, Maara, hast thou strayed.
Mere bundle of conditioned factors, this!
No 'being ' can be here discerned to be.
For just as, when the parts are rightly set,
The word 'chariot' ariseth [in our minds],
So doth our usage covenant to say:
'A being' when the aggregates are there.

Nay, it is simply ill[42] that rises, ill
That doth persist, and ill that wanes away.
Nought beside ill it is that comes to pass,
Nought else but ill it is doth cease to be.[43]

Then Maara the evil one thought:

'Sister Vajiraa knows me!'
and sad and sorrowful he vanished there and then.

Here endeth the Sisters Suttas.

 


[1] This Chapter V. has already been translated into German by Windisch, op. cit., and into English in Psalms of the Sisters (Appendix).
I repeat the latter translation here to make some emendations, and to give a few commentarial elucidations.

[2] Her name was Selaa, and as such she is numbered among the Theris, or senior sisters of the Anthology (Pss p. 43, n. 4). The Sa'nyutta contains the more adequate rejoinder to the tempter.

[3] B. states that Dark Wood (Andha-Vana) was a gaavuta, or 1/4 yojana south of Saavatthii (? about 1-1/2 miles), and was so called from having been the haunt of 500 bandits who gouged out the eyes of their victims (akkhibhedapattaa). They had so treated Yasodhara the preacher, when he had collected moneys for repairing the Chetiya of Buddha Kassapa. Dark Wood should thus perhaps be better rendered Blind Wood, Andhavana meaning either. The grove, adds B., was then guarded by royal custodians, and was often visited by a brother or sister in quest of solitude.
Viveka may mean spiritual detachment, but the Comy. here specifies it as physical (kaayavivek'atthikinii).

[4] Lit. 'fall from.'

[5] Nissaranan ti nibbaana.m. Comy.

[6] Pa~n~naa, equated by paccavekkhana-~naa.na.m.

[7] Cf. IV, 3, Ii 4.

[8] Way and goal = pada.m.

[9] Divaa-vihaaraaya: lit. 'for the day-sojourn.' [Ed.: ? not 'lit' at all: day-residence, day-abiding is 'lit']

[10] Thaana.m, meaning both 'place' and 'opportunity.' B. explains it as Arahantship.

[11] On this delightfully impudent figure cf. Sisters, p. 45. B. gives another application of it: insignificant understanding, or because taking her cotton wool in two fingers she cuts the thread. For aptness we commend Dharmapaala's figure of testing the boiling rice. [Ed.: The 'two-finger wit' 'testing the boiling rice' figure exists to this day in Italy. She takes grains of boiled rice between her fingers and squeezes to test their tenderness. This is the extent of her wisdom.]

[12] 'The knowledge (~na.na) in the attainment of the fruitions proceeding,' lit. rolling on. For vutta-° in the text, read vatta°.

[13] Questions, says B., arising under the influence of natural desire, conceit, false opinion. Comy.

[14] 'Lean through paucity of flesh and blood.' Comy. The legend of Kisa-Gotamii, of whom we know only the family name: 'she of the Gotama's,' is the most widely known of almost all those that have survived concerning the earliest followers of the Buddha, thanks mainly to E. Arnold's Light of Asia. B. here repeats the story of the mustard-seed, and gives a prior account of the Gotamii, narrated more fully, not in the Therigaathaa Comy., but in that on Dhp. ii, 270-5.

[15] Verbatim as in Ii 2.

[16] We give here a different rendering from Windisch's, which in'm fluenced that in Pss. of the Sisters. The Comy. sees in accanta simply antam atiita.m, an end or term that is past, viz. of the days when marriage and maternity filled her life. Bhaavan apu'nsaka.m eta.m: - 'This is a sexless state; that which was for me the end of child-dying, that was also for me the end of men' [as males]. Men were 'that-endish,' ending there (tad-antikaa, not antika.m, 'near at hand'). Cf. anta-ko, IV, 1, Ii 1, and antiyaa, the Singh, v.l. here.

[17] Of this Sister the Comy. tells nothing. Her name is equivalent to Victrix, and her verses coincide with the opening verses of Queen Khemaa's longer poem (Sisters, p. 83). Between these two women, indeed, tradition has recorded a tie of companionship, if we may assume that Vijayaa Then (op. citp. 91) is the bhikkhuni of the Sa'nyutta.

[18] The Comy. gives the usual list of instruments (see op. cit., p. 183, n. 4).

[19] See above, IV, 2, Ii 5.

[20] I have modified the rendering given op. cit. p. 184. B. pronounces santaa samaapatti, 'the good attainment,' to mean only the eightfold 'worldly attainment' of Jhaana practised for rebirth, and not as an accessory in the quest for Arahantship. The former was 'good' so far as it went. 'Darkness,' as always, is a figure for ignorance. Cf. with the last lines in Ii 6. We have followed S.Z. Aung's views in discarding 'form' in this connection, because of its ambiguity. The belief was that, in the Ruupa heavens there was such sublimated matter as served for vision and hearing, not to speak of locomotion, but in the formless, Aruupa heavens life was of purely mental stuff.

[21] Nor concerning this redoubtable lady has B. aught new to say.

[22] On this tree and its appearance see Pss. of the Brethren, p. 330.

[23] B. does not admit an alternative rendering for dutiya, such as Windisch finds in the Theriigaathaa Comy. We do not find there such an alternative, unless, for ekikaa va, we read ekikaa vaa. And we judge that, in ver. 230 of the Sisters' Pss., 'none to companion thee' ... should have been rendered 'no one can rival thee.' ... This does more justice to the literary quality of the verse. It was redundant to add anything as to her want of a chaperone after the word ekaa.
We follow Windisch in finding that Maara's fourth line in the text, absent in Therigaathaa, is an intrusive errant from Uppalava.n.naa's reply, where alone it fits, forming the second line. So we omit it. Nevertheless the Comy. accepts the intrusion, with the exegesis: 'Just as thou, come hither, meetest with neither acquaintance nor love, so they too (the sisters alluded to as less fair) would be even as thou art.' This seems a little pointless. It should be 'thou here alone, for all thy beauty, gettest no more credit than a plainer woman.'

[24] On C(h)aalaa and her sisters and the discrepant ascriptions in the Canon, see Pss. of the Sisters, 186 f.

[25] Or 'whereof dost thou not approve.' Cf. above, II, 3, Ii 9.

[26] Avuso, used by the Order to all save spiritual superiors, or kings.

[27] '"Some fool" is Maara's suggestion, hence her emphasis on the teaching of the All-wise.' Comy.

[28] 'Made me enter into, or settled me in the True (sacce nivesayi, a very unusual, but vivid phrase). I.e. the Third Truth or Fact of Nibbaana: - the end of sorrow. Comy.

[29] Cf. above, Ii 4. She sees in rebirth so great and fearful a vista as compared with the tempter's limited opening.

[30] Uppajjaii, arise, used for 'be reborn.'

[31] The Yaama or Plutonic gods. On 'King Yama' see 'Devaduuta-vagga,' A. i, 138 f.; also M. iii. 178 f.

[32] On these curious features in Buddhist cosmogony we can find as yet no discussion to add to Childers' art: Nimmaanarati, a definition given also in Theriigaathaa Comy., 169.

[33] Padhuupito. Cf. above, I, 5, Ii 1.

[34] Puthujjana, lit. many-folk, the 'masses' or 'million,' hoi polloi.

[35] Paasa.n.da is exegetically derived from 'the snares (paasaa) of opinions thrown over the hearts of men.' Comy.

[36] The Sa'nyutta has the singular, the Theriigaathaa, the plural.

[37] I.e. 'all [the mystery of the] factors of life and all [the mystery of] rebirth.' Comy.

[38] Bimba.m 'applied to the individual organism' (attabhaava). Comy. Windisch renders by Leib, which does not include mind. The whole 5-aggregate person is meant. The same figure occurs in Ra.t.thapaala's and Aananda's verses: Pss. of the Brethren, ver. 769; 1020, where body and mind are explicitly included.

[39] Agha is as vague as our 'evil,' hence we have taken into account B.'s dukkha-pati.t.thaanattaa attabhaavo.

[40] Or condition (hetu); always, in Buddhist philosophy, understood as impersonal.

[41] We have slightly altered here to get closer following of the original. 'Satta,' 'being,' is used for living intelligent creatures in general, including devas. 'All souls' would be perhaps a better rendering, the emphasis in the word being upon a permanent entity held to reside in a perishable frame, the worst of heresies for Buddhism. 'In the ultimate or highest sense,' comments B., 'a "being" is not found (or known).' So Kathaavatthu (Points of Controversy, p. 8, n. 3). Maara was apparently pointing to himself or to Vajiraa in 'harping on (paccesi, cf. Dialogues, j, 252, n. 3; lit. 'going back to'). In Theragaathaa, ver. 60, Comy., the verb is paralleled by gavesanto, seeking.

[42] The suffering attending the life of the five aggregates. Comy. It is as if Vajiraa went on to say: 'If you must have a unity, a unified notion that is perpetually present when the five aggregates are present, take Suffering rather than Satta. There is constancy of being for you, so only you see in that too the threefold pulse of life: - genesis, equilibrium, dying away.

[43] It is a curious accident that verses so famous and quoted in the Canon (Kathaa-vatthu) and other works, e.g. Mil. i, 45, and by B. himself, e.g. Visuddhi-magga, ch. xviii, as these should (1) not be incorporated in the Theriigaathaa, (2) receive so brief a notice in the Comy., (3) be accompanied by no legend about their author.


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