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Sa.myutta Nikaaya:
III. Khandha Vagga:
22: Khandha Sa.myutta
2.1. Upaaya Vagga

The Book of the Kindred Sayings
III: The Book Called The Khandhaa-Vagga
Containing Kindred Saings
on the Elements of Sensory Existence
and Other Subjects
XXII: Kindred Sayings on Elements (Khandhaa)
2.1: On Attachment

Sutta 54

Biija Sutta.m

Seed[1]

Translated by F. L. Woodward
Edited by Mrs. Rhys Davids

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[54] [46]

[1][than][bodh] Thus have I heard:-

The Exalted One was staying at Saavatthii.

The Exalted One said:

"There are five sorts of seed, brethren.

What five?

Root-seed,
trunk-seed,
seed from shoots,
seed from joints,
grain-seed,
making five in all.

Suppose, brethren,
that these five sorts of seed are unbroken,
not rotten,
unspoiled by wind and heat,
capable of sprouting,[2]
and happily planted,
but that [47] there is no soil
and no water.

Think ye, brethren,
that these five sorts of seed
would come to growth,
increase,
abundance?"

"Surely not, lord."

"Suppose, brethren,
that these five sorts of seed
are unbroken,
not rotten,
unspoiled by wind and heat,
capable of sprouting,
but not happily planted,
and that there were soil and water.

Now would these five sorts of seed
come to growth,
increase,
abundance?"

"Surely not, lord."

"Again, brethren,
suppose that these five sorts of seed
are unbroken,
not rotten,
unspoiled by wind and heat,
capable of sprouting,
and happily planted,
and that there is both soil and water.

Now would these five sorts of seed
come to growth,
increase,
abundance?"

"Surely, lord."

"As the earth-element, brethren,
so should the four stations of consciousness be considered.

As the water-element, brethren,
so should the lure of lust be considered.

As the five sorts of seed, brethren,
so should consciousness and its cause be considered.

By attachment to body, brethren,
consciousness,
if it got a standing,
would stand.

With body for its object,
with body for its platform,
seeking a means of enjoyment,
it would come by growth,
increase,
abundance.

By cleaving to feeling,
brethren,
consciousness,
if it got a standing,
would stand.

With feeling for its object,
with feeling for its platform,
seeking a means of enjoyment,
it would come by growth,
increase,
abundance.

By cleaving to perception,
brethren,
consciousness,
if it got a standing,
would stand.

With perception for its object,
with perception for its platform,
seeking a means of enjoyment,
it would come by growth,
increase,
abundance.

By cleaving to the activities,
brethren,
consciousness,
if it got a standing,
would stand.

With the activities for its object,
with the activities for its platform,
seeking a means of enjoyment,
it would come by growth,
increase,
abundance.

Were a man, brethren, to declare thus:

"Apart from body,
apart from feeling,
apart from perception,
apart from the activities,
I will show forth the coming or the going,
or the decease
or the rebirth of consciousness,
or the growth,
the increase,
the abundance of consciousness -
to do that were impossible.

If lust for body, brethren,
is abandoned by a brother,
by that abandonment of lust
its foothold is cut off.

Thereby there is no platform for consciousness.

If lust for feeling, brethren,
is abandoned by a brother,
by that abandonment of lust
its foothold is cut off.

Thereby there is no platform for consciousness.

If lust for perception, brethren, is abandoned by a brother,
by that abandonment of lust
its foothold is cut off.

Thereby there is no platform for consciousness.

If lust for the activities, brethren, is abandoned by a brother,
by that abandonment of lust
its foothold is cut off.

Thereby there is no platform for consciousness.

So also, brethren, if lust for the consciousness-element be abandoned by a brother,
by that abandonment of lust
its foothold is cut off.

Thereby there is no platform for consciousness.

Without that platform
consciousness has no growth,
it generates no action and is freed:
by freedom it is steady:
by its steadiness it is happy:
owing to happiness it is not troubled.

Being untroubled,
of itself it becomes utterly well,
so that it knows:

"Destroyed is rebirth,
lived is the righteous life,
done is the task,
for life in these conditions there is no hereafter."'

 


[1] Vin v, 132. In detail at Vin. iv, 35 Cf. M.P. 52-3. Explained by Comy. with examples of each sort, such as turmeric, ginger, etc.; wild-fig; knot-grass and bamboo; samiira.na a creeper with berries); grain, such as rice, barley, and beans.

[2] Cf. D. ii, 353-4; Dialog ii, 371 Text saaradaani (autumnal; year-old, so fertile). Comy., saaraadaauinii, and explains 'containing the sap, pith, or essence.' Professor R.D. translates 'selected seed,' M.P. 255. Cf. Questions of King Mü¡nda, ii, p. 79 n. Saarada.m biija.m "Seed which will give saara." It has nothing to do with saarada.m "autumn."'


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