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Sa.myutta Nikaaya
IV. Sa.laayatana Vagga
35: Sa.laayatana Sa.myutta
Pa~n~naasaka Tatiya
3. Gahapati Vagga

The Book of the Kindred Sayings
IV. Kindred Sayings on the 'Six-Fold Sphere' of Sense and Other Subjects
35: Kindred Sayings the Sixfold Sphere of Sense The 'Third Fifty' Suttas
3. The Chapter on the Householders

Sutta 132

Lohicca Sutta.m

Lohicca

Translated by F. L. Woodward
Edited by Mrs. Rhys Davids

Copyright The Pali Text Society
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[116] [73]

[1][bodh] Thus have I heard:

Once the venerable Kaccana the Great was staying among the folk of Avanti, at Makkaraka.ta in a forest hut.

Then a number of resident pupils of the brahmin Lohicca,
mere lads who were gathering sticks,[1]
came up to the forest hut
of the venerable Kaccana the Great.

On reaching it
they began to roam and wander up and down
on all sides of the hut,
uproarious and noisy,
playing all sorts of mad pranks.[2]

And they said:

"These shavelings,
sham recluses,
menials,
black fellows,
the offspring of our kinsman's foot,[3]
are honoured,
revered,
made much of,
worshipped,
and given offerings
by these sons of coolies."[4]

Thereupon the venerable Kaccana the Great
came out of his dwelling
and thus addressed those lads:

"Hush! my lads.

I will teach you the Norm."

At these words
the young fellows were silent.

Then the venerable Kaccana the Great
addressed them with these verses: -

Foremost in virtue were the men of old,
Those brahmins who remembered ancient rules.
In them well guarded were the doors of sense.
They had achieved the mastery of wrath.
In meditation and the Norm they took delight,
Those brahmins who remembered ancient rules.

But these backsliders[5] with their 'Let us recite,'[6]
Drunk with the pride of birth, walk wrongfully.[7]
O'ercome by wrath, exceeding violent,[8]
They come to loss 'mongst weak and strong alike.[9]
Vain is the penance of the uncontrolled,[10]
Empty as treasure gotten in a dream.

[75] Such, ways[11] as fastings, couching on the ground,
Bathing[12] at dawn, recitings of the Three,
Wearing rough hides, and matted hair and filth,
Chantings and empty rites and penances,
Hypocrisy and cheating and the rod,
Washings, ablutions, rinsings of the mouth,[13] -
These are the caste-marks[14] of the brahmin folk,
Things done and practised for some trifling gain.[15]

A heart well tamed, made pure and undefiled,
Considerate[16] for every living thing, -
That is the Way the highest to attain.

Thereupon the young fellows were angered and displeased,
and went away to the brahmin Lohicca.

On coming to him they said: -

"May it please your reverence to know[17]
that the recluse, Kaccana the Great, is attacking and abusing
the sacred things[18] of the brahmins."

At these words the brahmin Lohicca was angered and displeased.|| ||

Then it occurred to the brahmin Lohicca:

"It is not proper for me
to attack and abuse the recluse, Kaccana the Great,
merely on hearsay of young fellows.

Suppose now I visit and question him?"

So the brahmin Lohicca went along with those young fellows
to visit the venerable Kaccana the Great,
and on coming to him
greeted him courteously
and, after the exchange [76] of greetings and compliments,
sat down at one side.

So seated
he said to the venerable Kaccana the Great: -

"Worthy Kaccana, is it true
that a number of our resident pupils,
mere lads, gathering sticks,
have been here?"

"It is true, brahmin.

They did come here."

"And did the worthy Kaccana
have any converse with those lads?"

"I did, brahmin."

"Pray what was the topic of the converse?"

"I spoke to them to this effect, brahmin: -

Foremost in virtue were the men of old,
Those brahmins who remembered ancient rules.
In them well guarded were the doors of sense.
They had achieved the mastery of wrath.
In meditation and the Norm they took delight,
Those brahmins who remembered ancient rules.

But these backsliders with their 'Let us recite,'
Drunk with the pride of birth, walk wrongfully.
O'ercome by wrath, exceeding violent,
They come to loss 'mongst weak and strong alike.
Vain is the penance of the uncontrolled,
Empty as treasure gotten in a dream.

Such, ways as fastings, couching on the ground,
Bathing at dawn, recitings of the Three,
Wearing rough hides, and matted hair and filth,
Chantings and empty rites and penances,
Hypocrisy and cheating and the rod,
Washings, ablutions, rinsings of the mouth, -
These are the caste-marks of the brahmin folk,
Things done and practised for some trifling gain.

A heart well tamed, made pure and undefiled,
Considerate for every living thing, -
That is the Way the highest to attain.

Such, brahmin, was the talk Ihad with the young fellows."

"You said 'unguarded in the doors of sense,' worthy Kaccana.

Now how far is one unguarded in the doors of sense?"

"Herein, brahmin, a certain one,
seeing an object with the eye,[19]
is attached to objects that charm,
is repelled by objects that displease.

He dwells with mind distracted
and his heart is mean.

He realizes not
in its true nature
that emancipation of heart,
that emancipation of wisdom.

So that those evil unprofitable states that arise
do not come to cease without remainder.

"Hearing a sound with the ear
is attached to sounds that charm,
is repelled by sounds that displease.

He dwells with mind distracted
and his heart is mean.

He realizes not
in its true nature
that emancipation of heart,
that emancipation of wisdom.

So that those evil unprofitable states that arise
do not come to cease without remainder.

"Smelling a scent with the nose
is attached to scents that charm,
is repelled by scents that displease.

He dwells with mind distracted
and his heart is mean.

He realizes not
in its true nature
that emancipation of heart,
that emancipation of wisdom.

So that those evil unprofitable states that arise
do not come to cease without remainder.

"Tasting a savour with the tongue
is attached to savours that charm,
is repelled by savours that displease.

He dwells with mind distracted
and his heart is mean.

He realizes not
in its true nature
that emancipation of heart,
that emancipation of wisdom.

So that those evil unprofitable states that arise
do not come to cease without remainder.

"Contacting a tangible with the body
is attached to tangibles that charm,
is repelled by tangibles that displease.

He dwells with mind distracted
and his heart is mean.

He realizes not
in its true nature
that emancipation of heart,
that emancipation of wisdom.

So that those evil unprofitable states that arise
do not come to cease without remainder.

"Cognizing a mind-state with the mind
is attached to mind-states that charm,
is repelled by mind-states that displease.

He dwells with mind distracted
and his heart is mean.

He realizes not
in its true nature
that emancipation of heart,
that emancipation of wisdom.

So that those evil unprofitable states that arise
do not come to cease without remainder.

To that extent, brahmin,
one is unguarded in the doors of sense."

"Wonderful, worthy Kaccana!

Marvellous, worthy Kaccana,
is the way in which the worthy Kaccana
has defined the words
'unguarded in the doors of sense.'

Now as to the words
'guarded in the doors of sense,
guarded in the doors of sense,' -
pray, worthy Kaccana,
how far is one so guarded?"

[77] "Herein, brahmin, a brother,
seeing an object with the eye,
is not attached to objects that charm,
or repelled by objects that displease.

He dwells with attention fixed,
and his heart is boundless.[20]

Thus he realizes
in its true nature
that emancipation of heart,
that emancipation of wisdom.

So that those evil, unprofitable states that arise
come to cease without remainder.

Hearing a sound with the ear,
is not attached to sounds that charm,
or repelled by sounds that displease.

He dwells with attention fixed,
and his heart is boundless.

Thus he realizes
in its true nature
that emancipation of heart,
that emancipation of wisdom.

So that those evil, unprofitable states that arise
come to cease without remainder.

Smelling a scent with the nose,
is not attached to scents that charm,
or repelled by scents that displease.

He dwells with attention fixed,
and his heart is boundless.

Thus he realizes
in its true nature
that emancipation of heart,
that emancipation of wisdom.

So that those evil, unprofitable states that arise
come to cease without remainder.

Tasting a savour with the tongue,
is not attached to savours that charm,
or repelled by savours that displease.

He dwells with attention fixed,
and his heart is boundless.

Thus he realizes
in its true nature
that emancipation of heart,
that emancipation of wisdom.

So that those evil, unprofitable states that arise
come to cease without remainder.

Contacting a tangible with the body,
is not attached to tangibles that charm,
or repelled by tangibles that displease.

He dwells with attention fixed,
and his heart is boundless.

Thus he realizes
in its true nature
that emancipation of heart,
that emancipation of wisdom.

So that those evil, unprofitable states that arise
come to cease without remainder.

Cognizing a mind-state with the mind,
is not attached to mind-states that charm,
or repelled by mind-states that displease.

He dwells with attention fixed,
and his heart is boundless.

Thus he realizes
in its true nature
that emancipation of heart,
that emancipation of wisdom.

So that those evil, unprofitable states that arise
come to cease without remainder.

Thus, brahmin, one is guarded in the doors of senses."

Excellent, worthy Kaccana!

Excellent, worthy Kaccana!

Even as one raises what is overthrown,
or shows forth what is hidden,
or points out the way
to him that wanders astray,
or holds up a light in the darkness,
so that they who have eyes may see objects, -
even so in divers ways
has the Norm been set forth by the worthy Kaccana.

I myself, master Kaccana,
do go for refuge to that Exalted One,
to the Norm
and to the Order of Brethren.

May the worthy Kaccana accept me as a follower
from this day forth,
so long as life doth last,
as one who has so taken refuge."

Now as the worthy Kaccana visits the families of his supporters at Makkaraka.ta,
even so let him visit the family of Lohicca.

Then all the lads and maidens there
will greet the worthy Kaccana,
set a seat for him
and give him water,
and that shall be a blessing and a profit for them
for many a long day."

 


[1] Cf. S. 1, 180 (K.S. i, 228).Kanici hanici selissakdni L'muonti. Couuj. explains ' annamaniiar¡?upanissaya pifthir¡ gahetva langhitvaa,' wliich would seem to mean ' playing leap-frog,' but does not explain the word selissaka ('noisy '). Comy. MSS. road selissani. It does not occ'ir elsewhere.

[2] Kaanici kaanici selissakaani karonti. Comy. explains 'a~n~nama~n~na'n upanissaaya pi.t.thi'n gahetvaa langhitvaa,' which would seem to mean 'playing leap-frog,' but does not explain the word selissaka ('noisy '). Comy. MSS. road selissaa ni. It does not occur elsewhere.

[3] Cf. D. i, 103 (Dialog. 1, 112 and n., 128), M. i, 334. Ibbhaa = gahapatikaa; ki.nhaa = ka.nhaa. Comy. Bandhu-paad' aapaccaa, referring to the belief that non-brahmins (sudras), who were of darker complexion, were born of Brahma's foot. Cf. D.A. i, 254.

[4] Bhaaratakaa. Comy. ku.tumbikaa, 'cottagers who carry loads,' a term of contempt for the village folk who support the wandering recluses.

[5] (v)okkamma, 'deserting the ancient rules.' Comy.

[6] Jap(p)aamase, reflex, imperat. plur. of japati, may refer to tho 'vain repetitions' of the brahmins. For a passage of the same tenor cf. K.S. l, 178. Comy. says, 'maya'n jappaama kathayamaa' ti ettaken'eva braahma.n' amhaa ti ma~n~namaanaa.

[7] Visama'n caranti, 'walk in the uneven.' Cf. K.S. i, 6 n.

[8] Puthu-atta-da.n.da ('stick-taken'). Cf. Dhp. 406; K.S. i, 303, where Mrs. Rhys Davids translates: 'self-armed' Puthu liore = bahu. Comy. takes it to mean naanaada.n.daa.

[9] Tasa-thaavaresu. Cf. K.S. i, 411, [? no pg 411] a general term for 'all sorts and conditions.' Comy. sata.nha-nitta.nhesu ('sinners and saints').

[10] Comy. 'sabbe pi vata-samaadaanaa moghaa bhavanti.'

[11] Cf. Dialog, i, 230 for the habits of the naked ascetics Dhp. v, 141.

[12] Text paatho (recital) with v.ll. . ... I follow Comy., which reads piito-sinaana~n ca.

[13] So Comy.

[14] Va~n~naa. Comy. 'furniture, utensils, marks.'

[15] Reading bhaavana for text's baavana. Comy. ayam eva vaa paatho amisa-ki~ncikkassa va.d.dhan'atthaaya katan ti attho

[16] Akhila'n Comy. "soft and not stubborn.' Cf. S. 1, 27; K.S. iii. 113 n.

[17] Yagghe (see Dict. s.v. taggha) bhava'n jaaneyya Cf. K.S. i, 228. In next section Comy. saye. of ftaggha, 'codan'atthe nipaata.'

[18] Mante, charms, texts, ritual, etc., as above.

[19] Infra, Ii 202

[20] Appamaa.na-cetaso, as opposed to paritta. Comy.


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