Samyutta Nikaya Masthead


[Site Map]  [Home]  [Sutta Indexes]  [Glossology]  [Site Sub-Sections]

The Pali is transliterated as Velthuis (aaiiuu.m'n~n.t.d.n.l). Alternatives:
[ ASCII (aiumnntdnl) | IAST Unicode (āīūṃṅñṭḍṇḷ) ]

 

Sa'nyutta Nikaaya,
V: MahaaVagga
47. Satipa.t.thana Sa'nyutta
1. Ambapaali-Vagga

Sutta 10

The Book of the Kindred Sayings
The Great Chapter,
47: Kindred Sayings on the Stations of Mindfulness
Chapter I: Ambapaalii

Bhikkhni-vaasaka Sutta.m

The Nuns' Lodging[1]

Translated by F. L. Woodward

Copyright The Pali Text Society
Commercial Rights Reserved
Creative Commons Licence
For details see Terms of Use.

 


 

[1][bodh][olen][olds] THUS have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was staying near Saavatthii,
at Jeta Grove,
in Anaathapi.n.dika's Park.

Now the venerable Aananda,
robing bimself in the forenoon
and taking bowl and outer robe,
went to visit a certain settlement of nuns,
and on reaching them
sat down on a seat made ready.

Then a number of nuns came to see the venerable Aananda,
and on reaching him,
saluted the venerable Aananda
and sat down at one side.

So seated,
those nuns said this
to the venerable Aananda:

"There are here dwelling, lord Aananda,
a number of nuns
with their minds well established
in the four stations of mindfulness,
and they have attained
to greater excellence of comprehension than before.'[2]

"So it is, sisters.

So it is, sisters.

Whosoever,
be it monk or nun,
dwells with mind well established
in the four stations of mindfulness,
such may be expected to attain
to greater excellence of comprehension than before."

So the venerable Aananda,
after instructing those nuns
with a talk about doctrine,
having roused,
incited
and gladdened them,[3]
rose up and went away.

Now the venerable Aananda,
after going his begging round in Saavatthii
and having returned and eaten his meal,
went to visit the Exalted One,
and on coming to him
saluted him
and sat down at one side.

So seated,
the venerable Aananda said this to the Exalted One:

"Lord, here (in Saavatthii) robing myself in the forenoon
and taking bowl and outer robe,
I went to visit a certain settlement of nuns,
and on reaching them
sat down on a seat made ready.

Then a number of nuns came to see me,
and on reaching me,
saluted me
and sat down at one side.

So seated,
those nuns said this
to me:

'There are here dwelling, lord Aananda,
a number [135] of nuns
with their minds well established
in the four stations of mindfulness,
and they have attained
to greater excellence of comprehension than before.'

At these words, lord, I said to those nuns:

'So it is, sisters.

So it is, sisters.

Whosoever,
be it monk or nun,
dwells with mind well established
in the four stations of mindfulness,
such may be expected to attain
to greater excellence of comprehension than before.'"

"So it is, Aananda.

So it is, Aananda.|| ||

Whosoever,
be it monk or nun,
dwells with mind well established
in the four stations of mindfulness
shall so attain[4]
to greater excellence of comprehension than before.

In what four stations?

Herein, Ananda, a monk dwells in body contemplating body (as transient),
ardent,
composed
and mindful,
by restraining the dejection in the world
that arises from coveting.

As he thus abides in body contemplating body,
either some bodily object arises,
or bodily discomfort
or drowsiness of mind
scatters his thoughts abroad to externals.

Thereupon, Aananda,
his attention should be directed
to some pleasurable object of thought.[5]

As he thus directs it
to some pleasurable object of thought,
delight springs up in him.

In him, thus delighted,
arises zest.

Full of zest
his body is calmed down.

With body so calmed
he experiences ease.

The mind of one at ease
is concentrated.[6]

He thus reflects:

The aim on which I set my mind
I have attained.

Come,
let me withdraw my mind
(from the pleasurable object of thought).

So he withdraws his mind therefrom,
and neither starts
nor carries on
thought-process.[7]

Thus he is fully conscious:

I am without thought
initial or sustained.

I am inwardly mindful.

I am at ease.

Again, Aananda,
a monk abides in feelings contemplating feelings,
ardent,
composed
and mindful,
by restraining the dejection in the world
that arises from coveting.

As he thus abides in feelings contemplating feelings,
either some bodily object arises,
or bodily discomfort
or drowsiness of mind
scatters his thoughts abroad to externals.

Thereupon, Aananda,
his attention should be directed
to some pleasurable object of thought.

As he thus directs it
to some pleasurable object of thought,
delight springs up in him.

In him, thus delighted,
arises zest.

Full of zest
his body is calmed down.

With body so calmed
he experiences ease.

The mind of one at ease
is concentrated.

He thus reflects:

The aim on which I set my mind
I have attained.

Come,
let me withdraw my mind
(from the pleasurable object of thought).

So he withdraws his mind therefrom,
and neither starts
nor carries on
thought-process.

Thus he is fully conscious:

I am without thought
initial or sustained.

I am inwardly mindful.

I am at ease.

Again, Aananda,
a monk abides in mind contemplating mind,
ardent,
composed
and mindful,
by restraining the dejection in the world
that arises from coveting.

As he thus abides in mind contemplating mind,
either some bodily object arises,
or bodily discomfort
or drowsiness of mind
scatters his thoughts abroad to externals.

Thereupon, Aananda,
his attention should be directed
to some pleasurable object of thought.

As he thus directs it
to some pleasurable object of thought,
delight springs up in him.

In him, thus delighted,
arises zest.

Full of zest
his body is calmed down.

With body so calmed
he experiences ease.

The mind of one at ease
is concentrated.

He thus reflects:

The aim on which I set my mind
I have attained.

Come,
let me withdraw my mind
(from the pleasurable object of thought).

So he withdraws his mind therefrom,
and neither starts
nor carries on
thought-process.

Thus he is fully conscious:

I am without thought
initial or sustained.

I am inwardly mindful.

I am at ease.

Again, Aananda,
a monk abides in mind-states contemplating mind-states,
ardent,
composed
and mindful,
by restraining the dejection in the world
that arises from coveting.

As he thus abides in mind-states contemplating mind- [136] states,
either some bodily object arises,
or bodily discomfort
or drowsiness of mind
scatters his thoughts abroad to externals.

Thereupon, Aananda,
his attention should be directed
to some pleasurable object of thought.

As he thus directs it
to some pleasurable object of thought,
delight springs up in him.

In him, thus delighted,
arises zest.

Full of zest
his body is calmed down.

With body so calmed
he experiences ease.

The mind of one at ease
is concentrated.

He thus reflects:

The aim on which I set my mind
I have attained.

Come,
let me withdraw my mind
(from the pleasurable object of thought).

So he withdraws his mind therefrom,
and neither starts
nor carries on
thought-process.

Thus he is fully conscious:

I am without thought
initial or sustained.

I am inwardly mindful.

I am at ease.

Such,Aananda, is the practice
for the direction of mind.

 


 

And what, Aananda, is the practice
for the non-direction of mind?

A monk, by not directing his mind[8] to externals,
is fully aware:

'My mind is not directed to externals.'

Then he is fully aware:

'My mind is not concentrated
either on what is before
or on what is behind,[9]
but it is set free,
it is undirected.

Then he is fully aware:

'In body contemplating body I abide,
ardent,
composed
and mindful.

I am at ease.

Then again, by not directing his mind to externals,
he is fully aware:

'My mind is not directed to externals.'

Then he is fully aware:

'My mind is not concentrated
either on what is before
or on what is behind,
but it is set free,
it is undirected.

Then he is fully aware:

'In feelings contemplating feelings I abide,
ardent,
composed
and mindful.

I am at ease.

Then again, by not directing his mind to externals,
he is fully aware:

'My mind is not directed to externals.'

Then he is fully aware:

'My mind is not concentrated
either on what is before
or on what is behind,
but it is set free,
it is undirected.

Then he is fully aware:

'In mind contemplating mind I abide,
ardent,
composed
and mindful.

I am at ease.

Then again, by not directing his mind to externals,
he is fully aware:

'My mind is not directed to externals.'

Then he is fully aware:

'My mind is not concentrated
either on what is before
or on what is behind,
but it is set free,
it is undirected.

Then he is fully aware:

'In mind-states contemplating mind-states I abide,
ardent,
composed
and mindful.

I am at ease.

This, Aananda, is the practice
for the non-direction of mind.

 


 

Thus have I shown you these two practices, -
that for the direction of mind,
and that for the non-direction of mind.

Whatsoever, Aananda, should be done by a teacher
who seeks the welfare of his disciples,
in compassion,
feeling compassion
have I done that for you.[10]

Here, Aananda, are the roots of trees.

Here are empty places. [137]

Do ye meditate.

Be not remiss.

Be not remorseful hereafter.

This is our instruction to you."[11]

Thus spake the Exalted One, and the venerable Aananda delighted in what was said by the Exalted One.

 


[1] Bhikkhuni-vaasako Cf. K.S. ii, 145, as here (bhikkhun'upassayo). Comy. 'As the nuns were practising concentration exercises the venerable Aananda went there to encourage them.' In fact, Aananda seems to have been fond of the company of women. Cf. loc. cit. supra.

[2] Pubbenaapara'n visesa'n (in gradual succession, more and more) sampajaananti. Cf. Dialog. i, 296 n. Comy. pubba-visesato apara'n u.laara-visesa'n. A. iv. 47.

[3] For these terms cf. DA. i, 300; UdA. 242; SnA. 446.

[4] Text sa~njaanissati for sampajaana of previous section.

[5] 'Such as the Buddha.' Comy.

[6] Cf. K.S. iv, 253.

[7] Pa.tisa'nharaami. Comy. He withdraws attention and fixes it on the basic exercise (muula-kamma.t.thaana'n).

[8] Comy. 'He now abandons the mind-exercise (kamma.t.thaana'n).

[9] The inclining to the exercise is puree; arahantship is pacchaa. He now attends neither to practice nor to goal, so is indifferent.

[10] Cf. K.S. iv, 261, etc.

[11] The verbs, etc., are plural, as in the usual framework of the formula.


Contact:
E-mail
Copyright Statement