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The Pali is transliterated as Velthuis (aaiiuu.m'n~n.t.d.n.l). Alternatives:
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Sa'nyutta Nikaaya,
V: MahaaVagga
47. Satipa.t.thana Sa'nyutta
2. Naalandaavaggo

The Book of the Kindred Sayings
The Great Chapter,
47: Kindred Sayings on the Stations of Mindfulness
Chapter II: Naalandaa

Sutta 14

Cela Sutta.m

Ukkaavela[1]

Translated by F. L. Woodward

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[1][bodh][nypo] THUS have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was staying among the Vajjians
at Ukkaavela
on the river Ganges
together with a great company [144] of monks,
not long after the passing away of Saariputta and Moggallaana the Great.[2]

Now at that time the Exalted One was seated in the open air,
surrounded by the Order of monks.

Then the Exalted One,
observing that the Order of monks was become silent,
thus addressed the monks:

"Monks, truly this company seems empty.

Now that Saariputta and Moggallaana have passed away
my company is empty of them.

It is indifferent
as to that quarter
in which Saariputta and Moggallaana are dwelling.

Monks, whosoever in past times
have been Arahants,
fully Enlightened Ones, -
each one of those Exalted Ones
had such a noble pair of disciples
as were Saariputta and Moggallaana to me.

Monks, whosoever in future times
shall be Arahants,
fully Enlightened Ones,
each of them shall have such a noble pair of disciples
as were Saariputta and Moggallaana to me.[3]

A wonder of disciples it is, monks!

A marvel of disciples it is, monks!

To think how they carry out the Master's teachings,
how they give advice accordantly,
how dear to the fourfold company,
how delightful,
how revered and sought after they must be.

A wonder it is, monks!

A marvel it is, monks,
in the Tathaagata!

For though such a pair of disciples has passed away,
there is in the Tathaagata
no sorrow
or lamenting.

How is it possible, monks,
in the case of what is born,
what is become,
what is compounded,
what is transitory, -
how is it possible to have one's wish fulfilled:

'Oh I may it not perish'?

Nay, such a thing cannot be.

Just as if, monks, from some mighty tree,
standing firm
and full of vigour,
the greater limbs should rot away:

Even so monks,
from the mighty Order of monks,
standing firm
and full of vigour,
Saariputta and Moggallaana have passed away.

How is it possible, I say,
in the case if what is born,
what is become,
what is compounded,
what is transitory, -
how is it [145] possible to have one's wish fulfilled:

'Oh! may it not perish!'?

Nay, such a thing cannot be.

Wherefore, monks,
do ye abide grounded on self,
self-refuged,
taking refuge in none other.

Do ye abide grounded on the Norm,
taking refuge in the Norm,
having none other refuge.

And how, monks,
does a monk so abide?

Herein, monks,
a monk abides in body contemplating body
(as transient),
ardent,
composed
and mindful,
having restrained the dejection in the world
that arises from coveting.

He dwells as regards feelings contemplating feelings
(as transient),
ardent,
composed
and mindful,
having restrained the dejection in the world
that arises from coveting.

He dwells as regards mind contemplating mind
(as transient),
ardent,
composed
and mindful,
having restrained the dejection in the world
that arises from coveting.

He dwells as regards mind-states contemplating mind-states
(as transient),
ardent,
composed
and mindful,
having restrained the dejection in the world
that arises from coveting.

That, monks, is how a monk abides grounded on self,
self-refuged,
taking refuge in none other.

Whosoever, monks,
either now
or when I have passed away,
shall abide grounded on self,
self-refuged,
taking refuge in none other;
grounded on the Norm,
with the Norm for refuge,
taking refuge in none other, -
they, monks,
shall be my monks,
they shall be atop of the gloom;
that is,
they who are anxious to learn."

 


[1] Text title is Cela.m, and below Ukkaacelaaya'n, for which I read Ukkaavela, as at K.S. iv, 177 n., and UdA. 322.

[2] Comy. Saariputta died on the full-moon day of the month Kattika (October to Novembe.m; Moggallaana a fortnight later. Cf. Dialog. ii, 193.

[3] D. ii, 5.


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