Samyutta Nikaya Masthead


[Site Map]  [Home]  [Sutta Indexes]  [Glossology]  [Site Sub-Sections]

The Pali is transliterated as Velthuis (aaiiuu.m'n~n.t.d.n.l). Alternatives:
[ ASCII (aiumnntdnl) | IAST Unicode (āīūṃṅñṭḍṇḷ) ]

 

Sa'nyutta Nikaaya,
V: MahaaVagga
47. Satipa.t.thana Sa'nyutta
5. Amata-Vagga

The Book of the Kindred Sayings
The Great Chapter,
47: Kindred Sayings on the Stations of Mindfulness
Chapter V: The Deathless

Sutta 50

Aasava Sutta.m

Aasaavas

Translated by F. L. Woodward

Copyright The Pali Text Society
Commercial Rights Reserved
Creative Commons Licence
For details see Terms of Use.

 


 

[1][bodh] THUS have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was staying near Saavatthii,
at Jeta Grove,
in Anaathapi.n.dika's Park.

Then the Exalted One addressed the monks,
saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," replied those monks to the Exalted One.

The Exalted One said:

"Monks, there are three aasavas.[1]

What three?

The asava which is sensuality,
that which is becoming,
and the asava which is nescience.

These are the three.

[166] For the abandoning of these three aasavas
the four stations of mindfulness ought to be cultivated.

What four?

Herein a monk dwells in body contemplating body
(as transient),
ardent,
composed
and mindful,
by restraing the dejection in the world
that arises from coveting.

He dwells as regards feelings contemplating feelings
(as transient),
ardent,
composed
and mindful,
by restraing the dejection in the world
that arises from coveting.

He dwells as regards mind contemplating mind
(as transient),
ardent,
composed
and mindful,
by restraing the dejection in the world
that arises from coveting.

He dwells as regards mind-states contemplating mind-states
(as transient),
ardent,
composed
and mindful,
by restraing the dejection in the world
that arises from coveting.

For the abandoning of these three aasavas
the four stations of mindfulness ought to be cultivated.

 


[1] It is worth while repeating previous notes on this term, which I leave untranslated. In Further Dialogues, Lord Chalmers uses the word 'cankers.' Cf. Dialog. iii. 209 n., 'Aasava, in the sense of surrounding or flowing up to ... e.g., from the eye (or sight), a flowing, percolating, rolling on into the object ... Abhidhamma, adding di.t.thi (erroneous opinion), gives four. Comy. Cf. Dhs. IiIi 1096-1100.'


Contact:
E-mail
Copyright Statement